Skip to main content

Full text of "North Carolina state ports"

See other formats


Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/northcarolinasta1967nort 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



10 I 



Dot 



STATE PORTS 






A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING BUILDING. RALEIGH 




BARBER LINE 

Specialists 
in Handling Tobacco 

Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports to 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, Inc. 



GENERAL AGENTS 



New York 
Cleveland 

Chicago 



17 Battery Place 
Tri-Coast Shipping Co. 
Illuminating Bldg. 
Tri-Coast Shipping Co. 
333 N. Michigan Ave. 



AGENT 
Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



Walker Taylor Agency 



P. O. BOX 897 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines Inside Front Cover 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad Inside Back Cover 

Browning Photo Center 20 

Carolina-Norfolk Truck Lines, Inc 19 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc Inside Back Cover 

Duke University Press 2 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler 20 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co 18 

Glasgow Hicks Co 18 

Heide & Co., Inc 20 

Helderman Trucking Co 20 

Ideal Laundry & Dry Cleaners, Inc. 20 

Maersk Line 19 

Morehead City Shipping Co 20 

New Hanover County 18 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Front Cover 

North Carolina National Bank 15 

Southern Railway System Inside Back Cover 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. , 1 

Walker Taylor Insurance ....... Inside Front Cover 

Waters Shipping Co 19 

Wilmington Shipping Co 19 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc 19 






SSAi 



^±t±£^ 




moshi-moshi 
means hello 

intokyo... 
wachovia means Business! 



If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in 
Tokyo . . . see Wachovia. A Wachovia International 
Specialist can help you do business better in Japan . . . 
or anywhere in the free world. His fingers are on the 
economic pulse of six continents. He can smooth the 
way . . . right away ... for buying and selling in every 
major world market. Wachovia was the first bank in 
the Southeast to win the U.S. Government's coveted 



new E-for-Export Award. Look to Wachovia Inter- 
national for all this . . . and more: trade leads/ credit 
reports/ untangling exchange regulations/ acceptance 
financing/ letters of credit/ collection of drafts. 



BANK! & TRUST COMPANY 



JUMBO 

MAIDEN 

CALLS 



Newest addition to the fleet of sulphur carriers 
serving Texas Gulf customers, the SS Marine 
Texan — a 614-foot jumbo tanker — is the first 
ocean-going vessel to be built exclusively for 
the transport of liquid sulphur between U. S. 
ports. The Texas Gulf Sulphur Company 
brought her into Wilmington to the State Port 
Terminal on April 3, 1964 on her maiden 
voyage. Her cargo capacity of 23,700 long 
tons makes her the largest sulphur tanker in 
service. 




DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

is proud to be the publisher of 
THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

by 

Charles E. Landon 

(Professor of Economics, Duke University) 

In this important volume, Mr. Landon reviews the problems and 
successes of the North Carolina State Ports Authority during the first ten 
years of its operation. After an introductory survey of historical back- 
ground, the author divides his study into two major areas. The first deals 
with the features, activities, and commerce provided by the Ports Author- 
ity ; the second is concerned with financial matters and with the construc- 
tion and operation of port terminals. Considerable space has been devoted 
to the commodities which play leading roles in the state's economic struc- 
ture. Statistical tables, maps and illustrations are included in the volume. 

$6.00 



Order from: 

DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS 



6697 COLLEGE STATION 



(20% discount to Libraries) 



DURHAM, N. C 27708 







STATE PORTS 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



SPRING, 1964 



VOL. 10, NO. 1 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman 

WILLIAM G. CLARK, JR., V ire-Chairman 

E. G. ANDERSON 

COOPER D. CASS 

LOUIS S. FICKLEN 

JOSEPH FOIL 

WILLIAM PHARR 

ED N. RICHARDS 

F. H. ROSS, JR. 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS address L. C. 
Bruce, Editor & Publisher — N. C. State Ports Magazine, 
P. O. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 




WILMINGTON OFFICE 

EXECUTIVE 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



\. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 



E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce ir Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 



IDREW JACKSON, III, Director of Engineering 



N. C. State Port Terminal— Operations 

P. O. Box 3037-Telephone 

ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 

AL C. SMITH 
Operations Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

N. C. State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 507-Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suit 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Suit 303 New Telephone Bldg. 
Tel. 834-1892 

Box 149 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE. Director Communications 



Credits for photos go to Browning, Seco & Rivers & 
Harbors Construction Association. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Super Tanker 2 

Duke Marine Lab. 4 

Carolina Salt Co. 6 

Cruises — "E" Award — Lines 7 

Agriculture Export from N. C. 8 

Exportunities 9 

Pasquotank 10 

"Semper Fidelis" 12 

Tall Water Moves 14 



COVER STORY 

The story of Transportation is the 
story of progress. A glance at the 
whole map of North Carolina 
shows where the industrial evolu- 
tion of the past 60 years in our 
state followed the path of transpor- 
tation. Port terminals are tools of 
transportation, providing methods 
of changing cargo from water to 
wheels, or wheels to water. 

So this time on our cover we use 
one of the marvels of Highway 
Transportation, a view of 1-40 near 
McDowell County in wonderful 
western North Carolina. 

When the wishes of the people 
are fulfilled by our leaders, this 
four-lane artery of transportation 
will transport its commmeree to the 
sea at Wilmington and Morehead 
City and North Carolina will be 
one state from Clingman's Dome to 
Calabash and Manteo to Murphy. 



STATE PORTS 








NEW 

INDUSTRY 

AT 

WATERSIDE 



CAROLINA SALT COMPANY 

The opening of the Carolina Salt Company on 
property leased from the State Ports Authority 
means an additional 30,000 tons of cargo moving 
through our terminal at Wilmington. 

The plant will process and warehouse salt for the 
chemical, paper, textile and agricultural industries, 
and for water treatment plants. 

Raw salt will be brought to Wilmington by rail 
and truck and processed — then shipped to south- 
eastern points. 

Mr. W. W. Clute, Jr., Watkins Glen, N. Y. is Presi- 
dent of Watkins Salt Company, parent company of 
the Carolina Salt Company. 

Another shipside industry in the North Carolina 
Economy welcomed to the Wilmington port chemical 
complex in January, 1964. 





GIFT FROM 
N. C. MOTOR CARRIERS 

TRANSPORT EXHIBIT 

North Carolina, where air transportation began in 
1903 when the Wright Brothers made the world's 
first powered aircraft flight near Kitty Hawk, fea- 
tures a new transportation exhibit in the State Hall 
of History in Raleigh. The exhibit, a permanent fea- 
ture in the Hall of History, is open free year around. 
It traces the development of transportation from 
1664 to 1964, with displays ranging from models of 
early automobiles and locomotives to a showcase re- 
creating the Wright's first flight. The development 
of highway, rail, air and water transportation is 
traced through a variety of exhibits. 



r 



CRUISES FROM NORTH CAROLINA PORTS 




, 




North Carolina's two State ports, Wilmington and 
Morehead City, will be points of embarkation for 
cruises to Bermuda and the New York World's Fair 
this spring. The M/S Riviera sails April 28 from 
Wilmington for a six-day cruise to Bermuda, and on 
May 5 sails from Morehead City to Bermuda for a 
five-day cruise. Morehead City sailings for the M/S 
Riviera in June are June 10, 16, and 21. The June 
10 and 16 sailings are directly to Bermuda (North 
Carolina's Cape Hatteras is U.S.A. mainland point 
nearest the British Colony). The seven-day cruise 
from Morehead City June 21 is to both Bermuda and 
the New York World's Fair. 



NCNB wins "E 



99 



CHARLOTTE— North Carolina National Bank has 
received the President's "E" Certificate of Service 
for outstanding contribution to the U. S. export ex- 
pansion program, President Addison H. Reese, Char- 
lotte, has announced. 

The award was issued and signed by Secretary 
of Commerce Luther H. Hodges in the name of 
President Lyndon B. Johnson. 

"This award is a special tribute to the work of our 
International Services Department in providing world- 
wide trade and financial know-how to North Carolina 
business and industry," Reese said. A framed copy 
of the certificate, the highest governmental peace- 



time award given to any business firm, and the white 
"E" pennant are now on display in NCNB's offices. 
The citation states: "NCNB has conducted an 
imaginative and aggressive program of development 
in banking and credit services in support of inter- 
national trade. It has promoted increased exports at 
seminars, participated in the development of the 
North Carolina Trade Fair, supplied market leads 
and information to over 5,000 firms, and sent its 
officials abroad to advertise area products. These 
activities and the bank's 100 percent increase in in- 
ternational transactions in three years constitute a 
significant contribution to the export expansion pro- 
gram of the United States." 



35 Steamship Lines Serve Wilmington 



Thirty-five steamship lines 
served the North Carolina State 
Docks in Wilmington on a regu- 
lar basis during 1963. 

Four steamship lines were 
added on a regular service 
schedule during the year with 
Waters Shipping Company as 
agent. 

They include: 

Barber Far East Lines with 
sailings to Manila, Hongkong, 
Bangkok, Singapore and Dja- 
karta. 

Hansa Line to Tripoli, Beirut, 
Port Said, Kuwait, Basra and 
Bahrein. 

Eddie Line to Keelung, Yoka- 
hama and Kobe. 



Port and Associated Line to I 
Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide 
and Brisbane. 

Waters also acts as agent for 
Jugolinija Line with sailings to 
Genoa, Naples, Venice, Trieste 
and Rijeka. 

Shipping lines represented by 
Heide and Company include: 

Ozean Stinnes of Hamburg, 
Germany, with sailings to the 
continent. 

Manchester Lines of Manches- 
ter England, to England and 
Ireland. 

Holland South Atlantic Lines 
of Rotterdam to the Mediter. 
ranean. 

Maritime Company of the 



Philippines, home port Manila, 
to Japan and Philippines. 

United Philippines to same 
ports. 

Head Lines, seasonal trips, to 
England and Ireland. 

Venezuelan Lines with sail- 
ings to Venezuela. 

Grand Columbiana to Colom- 
bia. 

Booth American Lines to 
South America. 

Maersk Lines to Far East 
and Europe. 

Holland American Lines to 
Europe. 

Mitsui Unes from East Coast 
to Japan. 

Moore-McCormack Lines to 



continent and South America. 

Sninnihon Lines to Japan. 

Shipping lines represented by 
Wilmington Shipping Company 
include: 

Columbus Lines to South 
America, Australia and New 
Zealand. 

Grace Lines with sailings to 
South America. 

Dovar Line to South America 
and Caribbean. 

Transamerican Steams h i p 
Corporation with sailings to 
Caribbean. 

States Marine Lines to United 
Kingdom and Ireland. 

United States Lines to United 



Kingdom, Germany. France, 
Belgium and Holland. 

French Line to France and 
northern Spain. 

Kerr Company with sailing 
to France, northern Spain and 
Mediterranean. 

China Union Ltd., Daido. "K", 
Malaya Indonesia, all with sail- 
ings to Far East. 

American Export, Lykes Medi- 
terranean, Scindia Steam Navi- 
gation Company Inc., all with 
sailings to Mediterranean. 

Farrell Lines tc West Africa. 

South African Marine Corpor- 
tion to South Africa and East 
Africa. 

WILMINGTON STAR-M-WS 

Wilmington, N. C. 
raprint 



"fc^v w*^ 




AERIAL VIEW OF THE DUKE MARINE LAB AT 
PIVERS ISLAND NEAR BEAUFORT LOOKING AL- 
MOST DIRECTLY NORTHEASTWARD AND SHOW- 
ING EXISTING DOCK, "CAMPUS" AND NEW 
DRIVE TO RECENTLY COMPLETED AIR-CONDI- 
TIONED DORMITORY— LARGEST BUILDING IN 
THIS VIEW. 



TINY ISLAND AT BEA 



BY EARL W. WOLSLAGEL 

A small island near Beaufort, N. C. is rapidly 
gaining nationwide importance far out of proportion 
to its size on the map. 

Known as Pivers Island, it is home to the Duke 
University Marine Laboratory. 

Although a casual passerby may not be aware of 
it, the Duke lab houses an impressive arsenal of 
scientific equipment and research "know-how" for 
far reaching investigations into the teeming world 
of the deep sea. 

About 25 years ago, the late Dr. A. S. Pearse, then 
chairman of the zoology department at Duke, estab- 
lished the lab as an adjunct to the department. It 
was a place where researchers and students alike 
could get on-the-spot training in marine biology in 
a unique Tar Heel environment offering a host of 
species of marine plants an animals for first-hand 
study. 



NEPTUNE'S TREASURE HOARD IN THE FORM OF THIS COLORFUL SCOOPFUL OF MARINE SPECIMENS— SEA URCHINS, STARFISH, 
AND OTHER MARINE LIFE— IS EXAMINED BY ATTRACTIVE MERMAIDS, STUDENTS AT THE DUKE MARINE LAB DURING A RE- 
CENT SUMMER SESSION. 




ORT 



DUKE MARINE RESEARCH 



Sharing the island with an experimental facility 
belonging to the United States Bureau of Fisheries 
— an institution still in operation today. 

One of the lab's most interesting features is that 
within easy range of its waterborne trawling and 
dredging equipment are marine species of nothern 
waters living at about their southernmost extremity, 
while there are also great numbers of species com- 
mon to Florida waters and the West Indies which 
are pressing the limits of their most northerly known 
habitats. 

Comparative studies of environmental effects on 
such marine life are thus much simplified under the 
circumstance of geographic location alone. 

Now Duke is embarking on an impressive new pro- 
gram in oceanography. Launched about two years 
ago with the naming of an outstanding marine bio- 
logical scientist at its head, the program is envisioned 



as embracing the cooperative marine research ven- 
tures of a number of other institutions as well. 

Dr. Robert J. Menzies, internationally recognized 
for his participation and experience in directing 
scientific expeditions into waters of the Atlantic and 
Pacific for Columbia University and the University 
of Southern California, is the new program director 
for Duke. 

A ship, a 1 17-and-a-half foot ocean-going vessel 
of some 350 tons is to be delivered to the lab next 
summer from its builders in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin. 

A full time Captain for the vessel has been ap- 
pointed — a man well-known along North Carolina 
seacoast towns. He is David L. Beveridge of Beau- 
fort. 

The ship's range of up to 4,500 miles from its base 
at the laboratory will extend dramatically the hori- 
zons for marine biological studies, with the capability 
of navigating in almost any waters in the world. 



A SEA URCHIN IS SHOWN GETTING SPECIALIZED TREATMENT FROM A LAH RESEARCHER AT THE DUKE MARINE RESEARCH 
FACILITY IN THIS INFORMAL PHOTO. 




> /L \ JIp 




AT YMCA IN RALEIGH APRIL 8th— AGRICULTURE EXPORT 
CONFERENCE N. C. STATE PORTS PEOPLE VISIBLE WERE 
JAMES EDMUNDSON, TOBACCO SUPERINTENDENT— MORE- 
HEAD CITY, E. E. LEE, JR., DIRECTOR OF COMMERCE FROM 
WILMINGTON— ALSO COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE L. Y. 
BALLENTINE SMILES WHILE A. C. EDWARDS MC'EES AND 
SOME UNIDENTIFIED FRIEND LOOKS AT N. C. STATE PORTS 
MAGAZINE. 



AGRICULTURE 

EXPORT 

EXPANSION 

APRIL 8 



a 1,A 




^0^"^l 






c*^ 


UL^i \ 


pi^ b * 


^ ill 


|l J^B 


r^^i 


S W^J 



LEFT TO RIGHT— JOHN D. PALMER, TOBACCO EXPORTER; 
A. B. BRANNOCK, PROCESSED POULTRY EXPORTER. WOLF- 
GANG KOEHLER. FORESTRY SECRETARY, WEST GERMAN 
EMBASSY. 




WOLFGANG KOEHLER OF 
FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF 
GERMANY SPEAKS TO AG- 
RICULTURE EXPORTERS. 



LEFT TO RIGHT— BROOKS JAMES, BANKS NEWMAN, WINSTON- 
Im^tL. SALEM; DR. THOMAS AMORE, DURHAM, E. E. LEE, JR., WIL- 
■5 MINGTON AND Y. YAMADA, FORMERLY OF TOKYO, NOW RE- 
SIDING IN RALEIGH, ASSOCIATED WITH JAPAN MONOPOLY 
CORP. 




EXPORTUNITIES 



Afghanistan — Men's, women's, children's ready- 
made clothing of nylon, other synthetic fabrics; re- 
quests descriptive literature and price quotations c.i.f. 
Karachi, Pakistan. Importer of general merchandise. 
Trade Opportunities Staff, BDSA-111, Box TO-4AFG, 
Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C. 20230. 

England — Men's, women's apparel for golf wear, in- 
cluding cashmere knitwear, waterproof clothing, 
shoes. The Professional Golfers' Cooperative Associa- 
tion Ltd. (wholesaler) Golf House, Deodar Rd., Put- 
ney, London, S.W.15. 

Knitting Mills, Products 

Afghanistan — Hosiery for men, women, children ; 
requests descriptive literature and price quotations 
cif Karachi, Pakistan. Importer of general merchan- 
dise. Trade Opportunities Staff, BDSA-111, Box TO- 
7AFG, Dept. of Commerce, Washington, D.C. 20230. 

Men's, Youths', Boys' Furnishings 

France — Men's underwear ; other small wares. 
Paridoc (importer), 52 rue de Clichy, Paris 9. 

Women's, Misses', Juniors' Outerwear 

Australia — Ladies' garments, sportswear. Home 
and Overseas Trade Promotion, 51 Princess Street, 
Brighton-le-Sands. N.S.W. Attn: W. Leven, Manag- 
ing Director. 

Women's, Misses', Children's Under Garments 

France — Women's underwear. Paridoc (importer), 
52 rue de Clichy, Paris 9. 

South Africa — Corsets, girdles, roll-ons ; requests 
replies from manufacturers only. Gordon's Wholesale 
(importing distributor), Bunney St., Kensington, 
Maitland, C.P. 

Converted Paper, Paperboard Products 

France — Paper bags ; wrapping paper ; manufac- 
turer, wholesaler requests replies in French. Direct 
purchase and agency. ETS, Houix Pottier, 10 Quai de 
I'lle Gloriette, Nantes (Loire-Atlantique). 

Soap, Detergents, Cleaning Preparations, 
Perfumes, Cosmetics 

Australia — Cosmetics of all types. Home and Over- 
seas Trade Promotion, 51 Princess Street, Brighton- 
le-Sands, N.S.W. Attn: W. Leven, Managing Director. 

France — Cleaning products including detergents. 
Paridoc, 52 rue de Clichy, Paris 9. 

Agricultural Chemicals 

South Africa — Insecticides. Importer wishes to con- 
tact U.S. independent research concerns in veterinary 
and insecticide field, with view to importing and es- 
tablishing exclusive agency for newly developed, 
sophisticated veterinary and insecticide products, en- 
joying patent protection in South Africa, and not 
already well known in the field. Cape Veterinary & 
Dairy Supplies (Pty.) Ltd. (importing distributor), 
P. O. Box 171, Bellville, C.P. 

Sweden — Pesticides. Direct purchase and agency. 
Bayer Agro-Kemi AB (wholesaler, agent), Skruvga- 
tan 6-8, Malmo C. 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



r>Q 



Metalworking Machinery 

England — Machine tools of all kinds. Direct pur- 
chase and agency. Helec Ltd. 62a/64a Sayes Court Rd.. 
St. Mary Cray, Kent. 

Canning, Preserving Foods 

Afghanistan — All kinds of canned foodstuffs; re- 
quests descriptive literature and price quotations cif 
Karachi, Pakistan. Trade Opportunities Staff, BDSA- 
111, Box TO-5V, Department of Commerce, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 20230. 

Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

England — Cotton piece goods, broadcloths, fancy 
woven shirtings. Combined Trading Export Ltd. (man- 
ufacturer, exporter, importer), 45-55 Commercial 
Street, London, E.l. 

Sweden — Cotton fabrics for women's dresses and 
skirts. Wallengrens Konfektions AB (manufacturer), 
Varbergsgatan, Goteborg. 

Sweden — Cotton fabrics, high, middle-priced, for 
women's coats. Hagberg, Hedenlund & Co. AB ^man- 
ufacturer), Gamlestadsvagen 6-8, Goteborg N. 

Textile Goods 

Australia — Textile piece goods, particularly new 
fabrics and designs. Home and Overseas Trade Pro- 
motion, 51 Princess Street, Bright-on-le-Sands, N.S.W. 
Attn: W. Leven, Managing Director. 

France — Twine for wrapping; dealer requests re- 
plies in French. Direct purchase and agency. Ets. 
Lotrand, 23 rue de la Bieniaisaisance, Paris 8e. 

Special Industry Machinery 

France — Tire recapping and retreading machinery. 
Pierre Paul Caisson, 5 rue Edouard Fournier, Paris 
16. 

Electric Lighting, Wiring Equipment 

South Africa — Electric light fixtures, incandescent 
and flourescent; requests replies from manufacturers 
only. Electrical & Hardware Distributors, (.Pty.) 
Ltd., (importing distributor), P. O. Box 3862, Cape 
Town. 

Motor Vehicles, Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Iraq — Spare parts for automobiles. Direct purchase 
and agency. Rafidain Motors Company, W.L.L. (im- 
porter, wholesaler, retailer), South Gate, Baghdad. 

Aircraft, Parts 

France — Aircraft parts (.civilian), all kinds. Aero- 
nautic International France (.importer). Aerodrome 
de St. Martin, Bernay (Eure). 

Toys, Amusements, Sporting Goods 

France — Toys, all kinds. Direct purchase and agen- 
cy. S.O. F.C.I, (.importer, agent), Ibis rue Dupont-des- 
Loges, Paris 7. 

France — Plastic toys; manufacturer, dealer re- 
quests replies in French. Direct purchase and agency. 
Bioplastique, 1 rue Verte, Chilly Mazarin i,S. <&. O.) 





The Old Brickhouse — reputed to be the 
Pasquotank-Dismal Swamp Home for a 
consort of Edward (Blackbeard) Teach 
classic example of early 18th century archi- 
tecture — restored and occupied by the John 
Stuarts of Elizabeth City. 




VIEW FROM THE PASQUOTANK PASSING THE "OLD BRICK- 
HOUSE" BEFORE LEADING INTO THE GREAT DISMAL OF 
FAME AND FABLE. GEORGE WASHINGTON INVESTED IN THIS 
INLAND WATERWAY AND THIS HOUSE WAS OLD THEN. 



The song says — "Down on the Pasquo- 
tank where bullfrogs jump from bank to 
bank". We don't think they can do it 
here. The beautiful Pasquotank near Eliza- 
beth City and Camden courthouse. 



OUT OF THE PAST 



Many North Carolinians are descended from the 
first settlers of the "Albemarle", that strip of Coast- 
land North Carolina lying North and East of the 
Chowan-Albemarle Sound-Waterway. Elizabeth City, 
the largest community of the Albemarle, was orig- 
inally a port terminal on an inland waterway, the 
first inland waterway in North Carolina, the Dismal 
Swamp Canal, built and operated by a corporation 
in which George Washington was a heavy investor. 

The canal tied Norfolk and the Elizabeth River 
with the Albemarle and for years claimed this com- 
merce for our neighboring states. In the late 1920's 
Edenton was joined to Bertie County by the Chowan 
bridge and highway transportation brought the "lost 
province of the Albemarle" closer to Raleigh and the 
mother state. 



Elizabeth City became a distribution center, and 
the largest in the Albemarle by access to transporta- 
tion. The town was once a tavern and coach stop 
known as Betsy's Tavern when the first General 
Assembly of North Carolina met near Nixonton about 
9 miles away. It was near here the first public school 
in North Carolina was founded by the Society of 
Friends and the photos on this page show how 
legend gives Edward Teach a part in its past. 

On the Pasquotank River, below Elizabeth City, 
took place what was actually the first overt act of 
revolution against the King of Great Britain, called 
Culpepper's Rebellion. It was an act of protest 
against high handed, tyrannical government. Coin- 
cidentally, 200 years later a Culpepper is still- active 
in local affairs. Personable and able leadership is fur- 
nished by Mayor Levin Culpepper in 1964. 



10 




WHEN WINDS WERE RIGHT, SAILBOATS PACED EARLY STEAMBOATS, DESPITE TACKING PROBLEMS, ON NO. CAROLINA'S DISMAL SW AMP CANAL 



Leaving the South Mills Lock headed 
north on the Dismal Swamp Canal. 




The Locks of South Mills — the original 
lock was hand operated — built by George 
Washington and others in late 18th cen- 
tury. N. C.'s first inland waterway — still 
in use. 










n 



ft 



AMPHIB 



99 



MARINES 




THE ACTIVITY AT THE MOREHEAD CITY PORT TERMINAL 
DURING TIME OF A CRISIS WILL LOOK SOMETHING LIKE 
THIS. 



By Jim Smith 

Since 1777, when Continental Marines served aboard 
the Bonhomme Richard as sharpshooters for the great 
John Paul Jones, the necessity of a suitable port for 
embarking and debarking fighting forces with their 
equipment and supplies has been strategic to the de- 
feat of America's enemies. 

Sometimes it's difficult however, to convince the 
average citizen that an amphibious operation is con- 
sidered the toughest of all military maneuvers. Ac- 
cording to the man in the rear of the front lines, the 
hardest part of any war is the loading and unloading 
of vital war materials. 

The North Carolina Ports Authority however, with 
its dock facilities at Morehead City, has reduced con- 
siderably the stress of many Marine Corps operations 
with the modern accommodations which include 132,- 
000 square feet of transit sheds, 363,000 square feet 
of storage warehouses and sufficient truck and rail 
docks for loading. 

This unique "Gateway to the Atlantic" for Camp 
Lejeune-based Marines is the stepping stone for the 
mighty 2nd Marine Division, a basic Marine Corps 



12 



ground organization of combined arms and services 
capable of sustained combat. 

A Marine division during this nuclear era and con- 
stant cold war threat must be suited for employment 
in any operational condition or environment, and it 
must be able to conduct amphibious assaults under 
conditions not only where the use of nuclear weapons 
is threatened, but also where they are used. 

Morehead City's 2,550 foot wharf, adequate to berth 
four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum tanker, 
plus the LST ramps on Radio Island, allows the east 
coast Amphibious Force-in-Readiness to immediately 
deploy for practically any troubled spot in the world 
which requires a show of strength or a fighting force 
to preserve our American heritage. 

To any of the thousands of Marines who have served 
with the 23-year-old 2nd Marine Division, or who have 
used the expedient dock facilities at Morehead City 
to depart for combat in foreign lands, the Tar Heel 
port is "home." In reality, Morehead City is 45 miles 
from Camp Lejeune, the world's largest amphibious 
base on highway 17. It is 368 miles south of Washing- 
ton, D.C., and 320 miles from the Marine Corps Re- 
cruit Depot at Parris Island, S.C. 

A novice at map reading of the North Carolina 







GUARD 

YOUR 

SAFETY 



TROOPS SHIPS AT THE MORKHEAD CITY DOCKS STAND 
READY FOR LOADING" 2ND MARINE DIVISION TROOPS. 



terrain may be astonished at such pin-point accuracy, 
but the seasoned Marine veteran who has used these 
accommodations knows extremely well the location. 
Every Marine to be stationed at the vast training 
grounds sooner or later will find himself debarking or 
embarking from ships of the U. S. Navy for duty 
overseas. This is especially true of Marines assigned 
to Mediterranean or Caribbean deployments. 

Personnel is only one type cargo handled by the 
11-man Marine Port Control Section which works 
closely with the North Carolina Port Authority. 

For embarking or debarking this Control unit is 
reinforced by personnel from units actually connected 
with the vital movement. Together, they make up a 
team which is responsible for seeing that every Naval 
ship at the Morehead City dock gets into its proper 
berth, is loaded promptly and accurately, and gets 
away to sea again with the utmost efficiency and 
safety. 

The Morehead City Port gives the Camp Lejeune 
Marines freedom to move far — quickly, deploying 
forces on the spot to counter threats of national se- 
curity with mobility and speed of reaction, inherent to 
an amphibious fighting force. 




.!ND MARINE DIVISION TANKS WAIT THEIR TURN FOR 
LOADING ONTO THE CARGO SHIP (BACKGROUND) \T MORE- 
HEAD CITY. 



13 






PROGRESS 



PROGRESS AT THE WILMINGTON TERMINAL OF THE NORTH 
CAROLINA STATE PORTS AUTHORITY IS EXEMPLIFIED IN 
THESE PHOTOGRAPHS WHICH SHOW A 200,000 GALLON WATER 
TANK BEING MOVED 527 FEET. THE TANK IS 140 FEET HIGH 
AND WEIGHS APPROXIMATELY 125 TONS. IT WAS JACKED-UP 
ON STEEL ROLLERS AND ROLLED TO A NEW LOCATION IN 
LATE JANUARY TO MAKE ROOM FOR THE NEW 100,000 SQ. FT. 
WAREHOUSE NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION AT THE STATE 
PORT TERMINAL. 








If your Business is Local . . . National ... or International 



the Bank to 

With more than 65 offices in 12 of the state's 
major cities, North Carolina National is 
ideally set up to provide individuals and 
business firms with a full range of bank 
services throughout the Tarheel State... 

As a member of the Bank Wire System, 
North Carolina National Bank also main- 
tains direct contact with more than 200 
major banks in 63 of the nation's largest 
cities, to serve you instantly and confiden- 



seeisNCNB! 

tially in every state of the United States... 

And, thanks to the knowledge, experience 
and intimate worldwide connections of its 
International Department, North Carolina 
National Bank is uniquely qualified to serve 
your interests — swiftly and precisely — 
in any corner of the free world. 

For conscientious bank service around 
the corner or around the world, inquire at 
any North Carolina National Bank office. 



NCNB 



North Carolina National Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Offices in: Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Statesville, Tarboro, Wilmington, Winstarr-Saltm 




RETOUCHED PHOTO SHOWS NEW WAREHOUSE AND ELEVATED WATER TANK 

STATE PORT TERMINAL 
Al Smith, Operations Manager 



WILMINGTON 

WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 2,505 feet long with a 46-foot apron. 
Capacity— five 500-foot vessels simultaneously. 
Channel and turning basic depth— 34 feet at 
mean low water. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; 
depth of 34 feet at mean low water, and sup- 
ported by tank farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds with 266,- 
000 square feet, constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses of 302,- 
000 square feet with sprinkler and deluge sys- 
tems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, 
open ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, 
constructed of concrete and steel. Rail and truck 
access, overhead bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Ten acres paved open storage, 
accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling 
both trucks and rail cars. Certified weightmasters 
on 24-hour duty. 
16 



TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs, full length of wharf apron. Depressed 
tracks at rear of transit sheds and warehouses, 
entire length. Storage yard for 370 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
used single or in tandem and equipped for 80- 
inch magnet work and 2-yard bucket operation. 
One 35-ton locomotive crane. Four Diesel switch- 
ing locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
of various sizes and accessories such as cotton 
clamps, etc. Light and heavy tractors and trailers 
and 5-ton mobile crane. Facilities for full pal- 
letization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; ramps for easy access into sheds 
and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumi- 
gation plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road and Seaboard Air Line Railroad Com- 
panies, and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




VIEW OF MHC N. C. STATE PORTS TERMINAL— BEAUFORT INLET IN UPPER BACKGROUND. 

RADIO ISLAND AND AVIATION FUELS TERMINAL UPPER LEFT. N. C. STATE PORT TERMINAL WITH VESSELS IN BERTHS 

#2, 4 AND 5. APPROACH TO NEW BEAUFORT MOREHEAD BRIDGE IN LOWER FOREGROUND. RETOUCHED FOR NEW WAREHOUSE. 

STATE PORT TERMINAL 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY 

WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships 
and one petroleum tanker, with a depth of 35 
feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds of 132,000 
square feet. One constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry and two of metal. All with sprink- 
ler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Five storage warehouses, total- 
ing 363,000 square feet, with sprinkler and de- 
luge systems. Additional 95,000 sq. ft. to be com- 
pleted by November 64— Total 25 fire segrega- 
tion sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available 
on terminal. 



TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with cross- 
over, full length of wharf. Single depressed track 



full length of rear of transit sheds and ware- 
houses. Southern Railway freight car storage 
yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
with detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, 
cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for lull 
palletization cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Facilities for loading grain 
in ships or barges. Privately operated. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; also easy level access into tran- 
sit sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest va- 
cuum Cyanide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 
cubic foot steel chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern Railway Sys- 
tem and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 



SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 

North Carolina S u a'e Library 17 

Raleigh 




fi()\X\^ 



s 



&&$& 




GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 



MARINE INSURANCE 



Export Credit Insurance 



105 MURCHISON BUILDING 



PHONE RQger 2-9691 



P. O. BOX 1195 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year Wound mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



18 



FMI. M. 2454 
APPLICATION NO. 70 

waters shipping co. 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 
CUSTOMS BROKER 

P. 0. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



CAROLINA- NORFOLK 
TRUCK LINES, INC. 

SERVING PORT OF WILMINGTON 

2117 Carolina Beach Road 

Wilmington, N. C. 

763-0137 

HOME OFFICE NORFOLK, VA. 

Terminal: Charlotte, Raleigh, Wilmington, Kinston 
VOLUME & LTL FREIGHT 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE & CO., INC. 

109 South Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Serving American Exporters 
for Over 99 Years 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-S300 




Baltimore 2, Md. 

5 South Street 

SAratoga 7-6936 


New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondelct Building 
JAckson 5-8164 




Norfolk 10, Va. 

109 W. Main Street 

NOrfolk 5-4512 


New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
WHitehall 4-9120 


F.M.C. License No. 


481 





PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 



W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice-President 



WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice-President 



J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 



LEMUEL L. DOSS. JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



Offices At 

State Port Terminal 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. (). Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 3-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919-762-8187 



Federal Maritime Hoard Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



19 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

Custom House Brokers 

Freight Forwarders 

F. M. 8. No. 223 

F. M. C. Application No. 69 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 763-8271 
AND 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 726-5080 or 726-3652 



W. S. R. BEANE 

President 

L. B. FINBERG 

Exec. Vice-Pres. 



R. H. FUTCHS 
Traffic Mgr. 
E. MAYO HOLMES 
Sec. & Treas. 



MANAGER — MOREHEAD CITY — R. L. HICKS 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Browning Photo Center 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Finishers 

Color Black & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



JOHN L. BROWNING 



Phone RO 36263 
119 Market Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Morehead City, North Carolina 

P. O. DRAWER 31 
TELEPHONES 

726-6151 726-6152 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 

PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice President 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



William T. Davies 
Manager 

W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice President 

J. P.WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



HELDERMAN TRUCKING CO. 

VOLUME & L. T. L. SHIPMENTS IRREGULAR ROUTES 




BONDED CARRIER 

icc-^*9Trm\ 



PHONE ROGER 3-4070 



HOUSE LIC#1 
O. C-85 



P. O. BOX 1433 



3014 Carolina Beach Rd. • Wilmington, N. C. 
Serving All North Carolina Ports 



SHIP LAUNDRY 

AND DRY CLEANING 

One Day Service 

• 

IDEAL LAUNDRY AND DRY 
CLEANERS, INC. 

FRONT & ORANGE STREETS — PHONE RO 2-6651 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

"Serving Ships Since 1919" 



20 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island- Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 




^.-€>UA«1M^ 



Southern doesn't stop when the sun goes 
down. We go 24 hours a day, 365 days 
a year. That means when you ship via 
Southern your freight keeps moving. It's 
a wise thing to remember. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



CARTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Rao'io Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 
Charles Pincr & Teen Pincr PA 6-5440 

Operators 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Suite 303 New Telephone Bldg. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 



NORTH CAROLINA 

HAS THE 

NEATEST, QUICKEST 

CLEANEST 



FUMIGATION 




jfPMWr 




for 
your 



EXPORT TOBACCO 



MOREHEADCITY, N.C. 



P. 0. Box 507 

Telephone PArk 6 3158 

TWX: 919-255-2995 



NEW YORK 



26 Broadway, Room 767 

New York 4, New York 

Telephone BOwling Green 9-1843 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 



P. 0. Drawer 3037, Azalea Station 
Telephone ROger 3-1622 
TWX: 919-762-5661 



►.• e .*f 






IMMER/ 1,964 







^'« , 



, 'i 



i 



** ** 




".^ 



HBP: 






William H. Neol, Assistant to 
the Treasurer, and National Di- 
rector of the U. S. Savings 
Bonds Division, is a North Caro- 
lina banker who was senior vice 
president of the Wachovia Bank 
and Trust Company of Winston- 
Salem, where he served for 30 
years. 



In cooperation with the U. S. Treasury a cam- 
paign to increase the number of State employees 
participating in the Payroll Savings Plan for 
the purchase of U. S. Savings Bonds will be con- 
ducted during the period of August 4-Septem- 
ber 3. 

Withers Davis, Director of Personnel for the 
Highway Department, at the request of Governor 
Terry Sanford is Chairman of this campaign 
which is to extend throughout all departments, 
agencies, and institutions of the State Govern- 
ment. 

A special meeting of all heads of departments, 
agencies, and institutions was held in the new 
State House July 21. At this meeting the objec- 
tives of the drive and campaign techniques were 
discussed. Governor Sanford and W. H. Neal, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the U. S. Treasury 
and National Director of the Savings Bonds Divi- 
sion, spoke. 



LEFT TO RIGHT: GOV. TERRY SANFORD, WADE HAWKINS, WITHERS DAVIS. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Barber Lines 19 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad Inside Back Cover 

Browning Photo Center 20 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc Inside Back Cover 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler 20 

Export Expansion Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 19 

Glasgow Hicks Co 19 

Heide & Co., Inc 20 

Hi-Page Co 16 

Maersk Line 16 



Morehead City Shipping Co 20 

New Hanover County 18 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

North Carolina National Bank 1 

Savings Bonds Inside Front Cover 

Southern Railway System 18 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co > 15 

Walker Taylor Insurance 20 

Waters Shipping Co 16 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 18 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc. . , 18 




If your Business is Local . . . National ... or International 



the Bank to 

With more than 65 offices in 12 of the state's 
major cities, North Carolina National is 
ideally" set up to provide individuals and 
business firms with a full range of bank 
services throughout the Tarheel State... 

As a member of the Bank Wire System, 
North Carolina National Bank also main- 
tains direct contact with more than 200 
major banks in 63 of the nation's largest 
cities, to serve you instantly and confiden- 



seeisNCNB! 

tially in every state of the United States... 

And, thanks to the knowledge, experience 
and intimate worldwide connections of its 
International Department, North Carolina 
National Bank is uniquely qualified to serve 
your interests — swiftly and precisely — 
in any corner of the free world. 

For conscientious bank service around 
the corner or around the world, inquire at 
any North Carolina National Bank office. 



NCNB 



North Carolina National Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Offices in: Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Statesville, Tarboro, Wilmington, Winston-Salem 



2 NEW MAIDENS 



HAI HSIN 

On the event of the maiden voyage of the Hai 
Hsin, Jas. W. Davis, Executive Director, present- 
ed a silver wine cooler to the Captain on behalf 
of the N. C. State Port Terminal at Wilmington 
and the City of Wilmington. This is a custom 
which began this year at both port terminals. 
Present, representing the Mayor of Wilmington, 
was John Symmes, Mayor Pro-tem. The vessel 
is a 13,000 tonner, operated by China Merchants 
Steam Navigation Co., Ltd., Formosa. 

SS FERNLAND 

On May 23 the Waters Shipping Company had 
the SS Fernland of the Barber Steamship Lines 
in at Wilmington on her maiden voyage. At this 
time the ship's service was presented a silver 
wine cooler by Executive Director, Jas. W. Davis 
and Mayor Pro-tem John Symmes. Her Captain 
was Gunar Album. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: JAMES W. DAVIS, N. C. STATE PORTS, 
CAPTAIN T. Y. HSU OF THE SS HAI HSIN, MAYOR PRO- 
TEM OF WILMINGTON JOHN SYMMES. 



MITSUI LINE 



The Mitsui Line & O. S. K. Line have merged to be- 
come one of the world's largest steamship lines. They 
are represented in Wilmington by the Wilmington 
Shipping Company, and at Morehead City by the More- 
head City Shipping Company. It is anticipated that 



monthly service will be furnished Wilmington on a 
regular basis and average calls by the line at More- 
head City may be bi-monthly according to the opera- 
tions manager at each terminal. 




Mm - 



I 



Jn Mtmonnm 



On Monday, April 20, Robert L. Hicks, agent 
for Heide and Company at Morehead City, 
died at the age of 49. Bob was a native of Glen- 
coe, III. He had been in Morehead City since 
1940 and had been with Heide & Company for 
nine years. He was very well known and very 
well liked and is sorely missed by the port 
terminal folks and many friends who were 
associated with him. 



\ \ 







9CoVtA Cahotitut, 

STATE PORTS 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



SUMMER, 1964 



VOL. 10, NO. 2 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman 

WILLIAM G. CLARK, JR., Vice-Chairman 

E. G. ANDERSON 

COOPER D. CASS 

LOUIS S. FICKLEN 

JOSEPH FOIL 

WILLIAM PHARR 

ED N. RICHARDS 

F. H. ROSS, JR. 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS address L. C. 
Bruce, Editor & Publisher — N. C. State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

EXECUTIVE 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 






Credits for photos go to Browning, U.S. Corps of 
Engineers, U.S.M.C, L. A. Lentz 



CONTENTS 



\. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 



E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce e!r Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 
l DREW JACKSON, III, Director of Engineering 



N. C. State Port Terminal— Operations 

P. O. Box 3037-Telephone 

ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 

AL C. SMITH 
Operations Manager 





Page 


People Looking 


1 


New Harbor Southport — 




New Bridge Beaufort 


5 


Down the Historyland Trail 


6 


World Trade 


8 


Exportunities 


9 


U.S. Corps — Engineers 


ID 


N.C. A.I.W.W. 


12 


Charlotte Story 


16 


Practice War 


17 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

N. C. State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 507-Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suit 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Suit 303 New Telephone Bldg. 
Tel. 829-3855 

Box 149 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Communications 




COVER STORY 

This issue is the Travel issue of 
the State Ports Magazine. The 
cover is a reprint of beautiful 
azalea gardens typical of the area 
around Wilmington. N. C. Beauti- 
ful Orton Plantation, the inset 
shows the "old south" looking 
forward to the great future of 
N. C. Transportation. 

The previous issue cover showed 
a mountain super-highway going 
downhill to the coastland and the 
State Ports. When the North Caro- 
lina dream of a trans-state super 
highway comes true, the X. C. 
State Ports are ready to extend it 
to lands across the sea with deep- 
water shipping. 



EVERYONE READS THE STATE PORTS 





LEFT TO RIGHT: MISS ALEXANDER COUNTY, ANGELA SIGMON ; 
MISS McDOWELL COUNTY, VERONICA RABB; miss granite 
FALLS, TERRY SMITH. 



LT. GEN. VAN RYZIN— COMMANDANT OF 
THE USMC, 2ND DIVISION STATIONED AT 
CAMP LEJEUNE, N. C. HE READS STATE 
PORTS TOO. 



DUKE MARINE LAB. STUDENT "ON THE 
ROCKS", ADMIRES VESSEL LEAVING MHC 
STATE PORT TERMINAL. FORT MACON IS 
BARELY VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. DML 
WAS FEATURED LAST ISSUE OF STATE 
PORTS. 









tt|| »nfc2 



"knimgr 










> » - . 






-'SAfc 



ARTIST'S RENDERING OF THE SMALL CRAFT HARBOR NOW HKING CONSTRUCTED AT SOUTHPORT. N. C. THE AUTHORIZATION 
OK THIS DEVELOPMENT REGAN WITH A BOND ISSUE VOTED ON BY THE PEOPLE IN 1«59 AND INSTIGATED BY THE PORT 
AUTHORITY IN 1962 UNDER THE LEADERSHIP OK MR. JAS. F. LATHAM, A MEMBER OF THE AUTHORITY, WHO IS NOW JUDGE OF 
THE SUPERIOR COURT IN NORTH CAROLINA. 




WE THE PEOPLE 



IN MAY "WE THE PEOPLE". THE DIGNIFIED PUBLICATION OF THE 
NORTH CAROLINA CITIZENS ASSOCIATION, AND WHICH CONTAINS 
SOME OF THE MOST INTERESTING AND EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION 
ABOUT NORTH CAROLINA, HONORED THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
PORTS WITH A COVER AND AN INSIDE STORY. THIS HONOR WE 
HEREBY PUBLICLY ACKNOWLEDGE. WITH GRATITUDE. 




AERIAL PHOTO OF THE NEW MOREHEAD CITY-BEAUFORT BRIDGE WHICH CROSSES THE ENLARGED STATE PORT TERMINAL 
MOREHEAD CITY NOTE -$600,000 WAREHOUSE TAKES SHAPE IN CENTER NEAR S RAILROAD CARS. 



DOWN THE HIS' 




Artist — Mary Robinson — Elizabeth town 



PURDIE HALL 

Built by James S. Purdie and wife, Sarah Bailey Purdie in 1770. 

Situated atop the high bluffs on the west bank of the Cape Fear River about 12 miles 
North West of Elizabethtown, North Carolina in Bladen County. The house is of colonial 
architecture, part of brick imported from England.* Native walnut, cut from the sur- 
rounding plantation was used for the stair rail and the living room mantle. The wains- 
coting and window casements are said to be of the finest. The fence which incloses the 
premises is of hand split cypress and is as old as the house itself. 

The original gront of land was from George III to the Purdie family and remained in 
the family until 1946. It is owned now by the Bedsole family. 
* Possibly thru the Port at Wilmington. 



)RYLAND TRAIL 



Last issue we visited the historic Albemarle country 
and talked about the dismal swamp and the old haunts 
of Edward Teach. 

Now we tell you about Washington County and the 
Port of Plymouth, located near the estuary of the 
mighty Roanoke River, as it empties into the Albe- 
marle Sound. This is the site of one of the famous old 
ports of North Carolina history. It was here that the 
Confederate Ram Albemarle first saw action. The his- 
tory of Plymouth as a port is lost in obscurity. Bill 
Sharpe says in an article for the Roanoke Beacon that 

'"Two railways — Norfolk-Southern and ACL — at- 
tracted by revenue from lumber shipments came to 
Washington. And the river meantime acquired new 
importance. The early shipment of shingles, a sideline 
of planters, disappeared, but the naval stores industry 
arrived, and during the turpentine era, Plymouth was 
one of the busiest ports in the State. As late as 1923, 
three steamship lines made regular freight calls at 
Plymouth. Today, the river is vital to the section's in- 
dustries. Pulp wood and lumber come up the Roanoke 
to the factories; finished products float back down 
again. The volume of water — about 9 billion gallons 
per day — not only brought the pulp mill but offers in- 
ducements to other industries needing large quantities 
of water. The river is navigable all the way to Weldon. 

As one wanders further along the North Carolina 
Historyland Trail they come to Bladen County and 
Elizabethtown, in the heart of the Cape Fear Country, 
where the Highland Scots settled. This artist shows a 
typical home of the early period in Bladen county. It 
was just such communities as this springing up on 
the Cape Fear that resulted in the commerce being 
generated at the mouth of the river. Wilmington kept 
going through the long reconstruction years as a mari- 
time outlet for North Carolina. 

The history of North Carolina is forever tied to its 
magnificent water resources. To them we look for a 
brilliant future. 




Courtesy of Elizabeth City 
GEORGE MONCK, DUKE OK ALBEMARLE — 1608-1670 



M^ v - 




dlsri 


jyffL •• 


I 




4 




PIjmL 


M 


jjr^ Sr«H 




y 






mR^ ! " *% 


nB 


*"■%& 


^',<H»$L t * 


~ ' \f 


JJflfciyr m l -^^^^.uillH' 






fc— «JBr*iT" r t p" 


■ i '• 


^imm-.- .^. 




f I 


» 7* -J# 


A 


t. |#| 




-i 


' <M ^^ ** * 


* 


11 tfz^dl 


r 






. 






* ._ 








The capture of Plymouth, October 31, 1864. From a drawing. 



The ironclad "Albemarle" was built on the banks of 
the Roanoke River and participated in the recapture of 
Plymouth, April 17-20. 1864, when Confederate forces un- 
der General Robert F. Hoke attacked the Federal forces 
which had been holding Plymouth since it was captured 
by them December 13. 1862. On October 27. 1864, the 
Federals torpedoed and sank the "Albemarle." 



DIRECTORS OF 
NORTH CAROLINA WORLD TRADE ASSOCIATION 




FRONT ROW— LEFT TO RIGHT: W. C. CALDWELL, JR., WALTER J. KELLY, C. R. HARRIS. PRESIDENT, BRUCE G. BALLENGER. 

SEC. & TREAS., H. BANKS NEWMAN. 

BACK ROW— LEFT TO RIGHT: PETRO KULYNYCH, CARL H. DAWSON, CECIL GANT, JR., T. S. RYON, DR. S. THOMAS AMORE. 



REGIONAL EXPORT EXPANSION COUNCIL 



Secretary of Commerce Hodges has re-appointed H. 
Banks Newman, Winston-Salem, N. C, Chairman of the 
Greensboro Regional Export Expansion Council. Newman, 
retired Manager of the Export Department for R. J. 
Reynolds, will serve until June 30, 1965. 

Joel B. New, Director of the Greensboro Field Office of 
the U. S. Department of Commerce and Executive Secre- 
tary to the Greensboro Regional Export Expansion Coun- 
cil, announced the appointment. The Council serves all of 
North Carolina and its 21 members are appointed annually 
by the Secretary of Commerce. 




The Export Council meets regularly throughout the 
State developing programs to encourage export sales by 
North Carolina firms. The 21 business leaders have spon- 
sored 30 export conferences and state-wide workshops. 
From their activity, 37 North Carolina firms made initial 
export sales in 1962 and 41 entered export markets in 
1963. 

Newman served as Manager of the Export Depai'tment 
for Reynolds for 14 years. He has been a member of the 
Regional Export Expansion Council for four years and an 
active member of the Southeast World Trade Group and 
the North Carolina World Trade Association. He served 
as Council Vice-Chairman in 1962 and as Chairman during 
1963. 

New said that Secretary Hodges, in his re-appointment 
of Mr. Newman, stated: 

"President Johnson has stressed the importance of 
export expansion to increase profits, relieve unem- 
ployment, and assist American industry to develop on 
a broad international level. As we continue to improve 
our balance of payments, our international economic 
position will be materially strengthened." 



E. BRUCE PEABODY, SR., WHO HAS BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH THE GENERAL 
ELECTRIC COMPANY AND WITH WALKER-MARTIN, INC. IN MANAGEMENT, 
AND SALES PROMOTION FOR OVER TWENTY-TWO YEARS AND WHO HAS 
BEEN IN THE REAL ESTATE BUSINESS HERE IN RALEIGH, IS THE CO- 
ORDINATOR OF EXPORT DEVELOPMENT FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF CON- 
SERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT. MR. PEABODY IS A FORMER CHARLOTTE 
HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE, WHO WAS A THREE-LETTER MAN AT DAVIDSON. 
HE IS MARRIED TO THE FORMER CORNELIA JANE HOLLOWAY OF DURHAM. 
THEY HAVE THREE SONS AND ONE DAUGHTER. IN HIS DUTIES AS EXPORT 
DEVELOPER HE WILL WORK CLOSELY WITH THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
PORTS AUTHORITY, THE REGIONAL EXPORT EXPANSION COUNCIL AND 
THE COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY OF C & D. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN 
DEVELOPING YOUR EXPORT TRADE, THEN CONTACT BRUCE PEABODY AT 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box [950, Room 108 
Post Office Hid),'. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



For Increased Sales and Profits 

Fruits, Vegetable Farms 

Germany — Apples, pears, fresh, dry; cif European 
ports, Grelinger & Co. GmbH (importer, wholesaler, 
commission merchant), Grossmarkthalle, 5 Koeln. 

Food Products 

England — Quick frozen foods, all kinds. Premier 
Farm Products Ltd. (wholesaler, sales agent), Wig- 
genhall Rd., Watford, Hertfordshire. 

Bahrain — Foodstuffs, kindred items, especially 
canned vegetables, juices, meat, fish. Ibrahim Mah- 
mood Behzad & Sons (importer, retailer, wholesaler), 
466/1 Al-Fadel Section, Manama. 

Food Preparation 

Pakistan — Cotton seed, soya bean (ORSB) ; oils. The 
Punjab Vegetable Ghee & General Mills Ltd., 23 The 
Mall, Lahore. 

Greece — Poultry, cattle feed : soyameal, meatmeal, 
fishmeal, cereals. Manufacturer of mixed feed for 
cattle, poultry requests replies from producers only, 
quotations cif Piraeus. Synthetiki P. Pavlou Brothers 
Pyrgou St., Moschato, Athens. 

Meat Products 

Netherlands Antilles — All kinds of canned meats. 
Hector Henriquez B. Inc. (importer, wholesaler, 
agent), 62 Penstraat, Willemstad, Curacao. 

Canning, Preserving Foods 

Germany — Peas, beans, other legumes, canned. 
Friedrich O. Ebert (importer, exporter), 127a Main- 
zer Landstrasse, 6 Frankfurt/Main. 

South Africa — Delecatessen-type canned and bottled 
products, particularly shrimp, crab. Direct purchase 
and agency. Randies Bro. & Hudson Ltd. (importers, 
wholesalers), P. 0. Box 1046, Durban, Natal. 

Grain Mill Products, Baking Ingredients 

Germany — Flour, other baking ingredients. Alois 
Scherer (wholesaler, importer, exporter), 3 Schmiek- 
strasse, 6 Frankfurt Main. 

Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

Japan — Dish towels, high quality, Requests litera- 
ture, prices. Houkoku Bldg., 9, 1-chome, Takaoka-cho, 
Higashi-ku, Nagoya. 

Knitting Mills 

Norway — Sweatshirts, fleece-lined, for supply to 
Norwegian schools, colleges with or without relevant 
school or college badge imprinted. Direct purchase and 
agency. J. Koht, A/S (importing wholesaler), Kongs- 
vinger. 

Nigeria — Inexpensive knitting fabrics for men's un- 
derwear. E. 0. Offia Brothers & Sons (manufacturer), 
129 Market Rd., Aba. 

Philippines — Men's knitwear, all kinds. Direct pur- 
chase and agency. Filidian Bazar, Hemandas & Co. 
(importer, retailer, wholesaler), 135-137 San Pedro 
St., Davao City. 

Men's, Youths', Boys' Furnishings 

Germany — All kinds of nightwear for men, boys. 
Oldenburger Spinnstoff-Gesellechaft mbH. (manufac- 



turer, importer), Kaiserstrasse 25 27,2!) Oldenburg. 

Bahrain Men's, youths', boys' clothing; trou 
shirts. New Store (importer, retailer, wholesaler I , 
P. (). BOX 25, Bahrain, Arabian Gulf. 

Women's, Misses', Juniors' Outerwear 

Bahrain- Dresses, women's, misses'; good quality. 
best fashions. Bastaki Store (importer, retailer, com- 
mission agent), P. O. Box 392, Bahrain, Arabian Gulf. 
Bali rain — Women's, misses', juniors' outerwear: all 
types, including suits, skirts. New Store 'importer, 
retailer, wholesaler), P. O. Box 25, Bahrain, Arabian 
Gulf. 

Women's, Misses' Under Garments 

Germayiy — All kinds of nightwear for women, 
misses. Oldenburger Spinnstoff-Gesellschaft mbH. 
(manufactuere, importer), Kaiserstrasse 25 -7 :l'.i 
Oldenburg. 

Senegal — Inexpensive lingerie for African market. 
Requests replies in French. Raymond Labourasse 
(commission merchant ), Rue de Thony x Rue de Valny, 
Dakar, Senegal. 

Girls', Children's, Infants' Outerwear 

BaJirain — Children's, infants' dresses, all kinds. Bas- 
taki Store (importer, retailer, commission agent), 
P. 0. Box 392, Bahrain, Arabian Gulf. 

Apparel, Accessories 

France — Gloves, leather, cotton; caps. Ch. Grajek 
(manufacturer), 70 Rue Vieille du Temple, Parie 3e. 

Sawmills, Planing Mills 

Germany — Cut, rough lumber; metric measurements 
preferred. Cif Rotterdam. J. Alfred Groger & Co. (im- 
porter, wholesaler), 78a Praunheimer Landstrasse. 6 
Frankfurt/ Main. 

Household Furniture 

France — Home, upholstered furniture: chairs, sofas. 
Direct purchase and agency. Ets. Charles Schweitzer 
(manufacturer, importing agent I, 1 Hue Bouret, Paris 
19e. 

Australia — Occasional pieces for living, dining 
rooms; best quality fabrics, design. Marshall Rochaix 
Pty. Ltd. (wholesaler), 94 Petrie Terrace, Brisbane, 
Queensland. 

Office Furniture 

France — All kinds of oflice furniture: tables, chairs. 
cabinets of metal or wood. Direct purchase and agency. 
Burotype (importer, dealer, agent), 22 24 Rue St- 
Georges, Paris 9e. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Netherlands — Sanding, polishing machines. Direct 
purchase and agency. Fa. Denis de Ploeg (commission 
merchant), 8a Plein. The Hague. 

Farm Machinery 

France Rotary hand type cultivator. Direct pur- 
chase and agency. Agrarbor (importer, dealer'. 35 
Rue de Dantzig, Paris 15e. 



WATER RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT BY 
THE U. S. ENGINEERS IN NORTH CAROLINA 




^•'" "" This fall will mark the 

80th anniversary of water 
resources development in 
North Carolina by the Wil- 
mington Army Engineer 
District — development 
which has been a major 
factor in the State's eco- 
nomic growth. Federal re- 
sponsibility for water re- 
sources development in 
North Carolina actually 
started, in 1829. before the 
District came into being, 
when the U. S. Government 
took over and continued improvement work initiated 
in Wilmington Harbor by the State of North Caro- 
lina in 1823. 

Colonel Joseph S. Grygiel is the current and 37th 
District Engineer to serve this District. He has di- 
rected its operations since June 1962, and considers 
water resources development in North Carolina yet 
in its pioneer stage since river basin studies now 
authorized or being conducted — the Cape Fear, the 
Neuse and the Tar, take into consideration the need 



COL. J. S. GRYGIEL, CE 
District Engineer 
USA Engr. Dist., Wilmington, N. 



by IDA M. GASKILL 

for water resources in the State for the next 100 
years for all purposes — flood control: power; navi- 
gation; municipal, industrial and agricultural water 
supply; low flow regulation; pollution abatement; 
fish and wildlife, recreation. 

The District's civil works activities encompass 
most of North Carolina and the south central portion 
of Virginia. End to end the waterways for which it 
is responsible would stretch some 1200 miles, in 
North Carolina, and include the deep water ports 
of Wilmington and Morehead City, the Atlantic In- 
tercoastal Waterway, and numerous small harbors. 
In addition, it operates 2 large flood control and 
power dams and reservoirs in the Roanoke River 
Basin, in North Carolina and Virginia — the John H. 
Kerr Dam & Reservoir and Philpott Dam and Reser- 
voir. 

The District's command consists of 2 officers — the 
District Engineer and a Deputy District Engineer — 
and 252 civilians. This year Congress authorized the 
initial funds for the construction of nearly $36 mil- 
lion of work in North Carolina. Major projects are 
design of New Hope Dam. which is the initial stage in 
the Cape Fear River Basin development; Wilmington 
Harbor; and beach protection projects at Wrights- 
ville and Carolina Beaches. 




THIS DREDGE WAS COMMISSIONED IN FEBRUARY 1964 AND IS THE ONLY ONE OF ITS KIND. IT IS BEING USED IN THE NUMEROUS 
«M\LL HARBORS INLETS AND STREAMS IN COASTAL NORTH CAROLINA WHERE IT IS IMPRACTICAL TO USE PIPELINE DREDGES. 
IT IS FILLING A SPECIFIC AND URGENT NEED IN THE DISTRICT. 



10 












^jam 




rro 







5£ 






MILLIONS OK MKNHADEN IN HOLD OK TRAWLER AT WORK IN OCEAN KISHING GROUNDS NEAR SOUTHPORT. N. C. i FISHING 
GROUNDS ARE REACHED THRU AIWW.J 



■= ; 







■ ■• I I i I 




SHIPPING IN WILMINGTON HARBOR. PRESENT CONTROLLING DEPTH 36 FT. 
AUTHORIZED HUT NOT YET FUNDED BY THE CONGRESS IS A PROJECT TO 
DEEPEN THE RIVER TO 88 FT. AT AN ESTIMATED COST OF some 6.G MILLION 
DOLLARS. WHEN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TOOK OVER IMPROVEMENT 
OK THE RIVER THERE WAS ABOUT 7.5 KEET AT LOW WATER. 



JOHN H. KF.KK DAM AND RESERVOIR. IN NORTH 
CAROI.INV \ND VIRGINIA. ROCK FISH CAUGHT 
NEAR POWER HOUSE. WEIGHT: 12 LPS 



11 



NORTH CAROLINA SECTION 

Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway 












TUG HANDLES VESSEL IN UPPER WILMINGTON HARBOR NEAR 
USS NORTH CAROLINA MEMORIAL. 




PULPWOOD BARGE LEAVING CAPE FEAR RIVER LOCK & DAM 
NO. 1 ON THE CAPE FEAR RIVER ABOVE WILMINGTON— A 
FAMILIAR SITE. THIS COMMERCE ORIGINATES AT POINTS 
ALONG THE RIVER BETWEEN LOCKS AND DAMS NOS. 1 AND 3 
AND BARGED DOWNSTREAM TO WILMINGTON AND ON TO 
GEORGETOWN, S. C. FOR PROCESSING. CONTROLLING DEPTH 
OF RIVER IS 8 FT. THIS PORTION OF THE CFR HAS BEEN 
UNDER DEVELOPMENT BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SINCE 
1881. THE CONTROLLING DEPTH WAS THEN 2% FT. 



1 ' ftiwm 



w 



;**' 




f. I '*%<* 




' - » -^ 



OIL BARGE LEAVING CFR L & D NO. 3. PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 
ARE BARGED UPSTREAM TO FAYETTEVILLE FOR LOCAL USE 
AND DISTRIBUTION TO SURROUNDING TOWNS AND COMMUNI- 
TIES, INCLUDING FORT BRAGG AND OTHER MILITARY IN- 
STALLATIONS. 



The North Carolina section of the Atlantic Intra- 
coastal Waterway starts at Great Bridge, Virginia, 
and traverses some 308 miles (not including side 
channels) through sounds, rivers and land cuts to 
Little River, S. C. 

On entering the North Carolina section, the boat- 
man has a choice of two routes, both of which as units 
of the Waterway extend south through natural water- 
ways and land cuts into Albemarle Sound where they 
intersect about 8 miles southeast of Wade Point Light- 
house at the mouth of Pasquotank River. The princi- 
pal route, originally known as the Albemarle & Chesa- 
peake Canal begun in 1856 as a private enterprise, 
reaches the Albemarle Sound through North Landing 
River in Currituck Sound. The alternate route is 
through the Great Dismal Swamp Canal, which was 
surveyed by George Washington in 1755 and built later 
so that farmers in the northeastern section of North 
Carolina could transport their products to Norfolk, the 
most accessible marketing area in the early 19th Cen- 
tury. 

From that intersection in Albemarle Sound, the 
Waterway continues southward via Alligator River 
and a 22-mile land cut into Pungo River, across Pam- 
lico River, and Pamlico Sound at the mouth of Neuse 
River, and thence by other streams and land cuts to 
Beaufort, N. C. 

From Beaufort, N. C, the Waterway follows the 
sounds, streams, and marine marshes along the coast, 
enters Cape Fear River about 13 miles below Wilming- 
ton, N. C, and follows that river downstream to South- 
port. From Southport, it again follows coastal streams 
and marshes to a point about 3 miles south of Little 
River, S. C. 

From a construction point of view the Waterway is 
divided into three sections. The portion between the 
Virginia line and Beaufort was started in August 
1923 and completed in February 1930; the channel 
between Beaufort and Cape Fear River was started in 
March 1927 and completed in December 1932; the 
channel from Cape Fear River to Little River, S. C, 
was started in 1931 and completed in 1940. Feeder 
channels were provided during this time to several 
points near the Waterway. 

Five bridges are owned, operated and maintained 
by the U. S. Government along this route. There are 
13 other bridges, owned and operated by the State of 
North Carolina. 

More than 50 miles of the Waterway were cut 
through. Principal land cuts are: six miles between 
the Virginia line and North River Bar; the Alligator- 
Pungo Cut, 22.5 miles; Goose Creek-Bay River Cut, 
2.2 miles. 

The authorized controlling depth is 12 feet, and 
channel widths vary from 90 feet in land cuts to 300 
feet in open water. The controlling depth is generally 
maintained through the waterway. 



12 








BOAT BASIN AT STUMPY POINT, N. C. (PROJECT: STUMPY POINT BAY N 



Intracoastal Waterway 



Up to 1963, the North Carolina section of the water- 
way has cost $10.3 million. Annual maintenance cost 
during the past three years averaged $500,000. 

The project has provided economic worth many 
times over. Through this safe passage annually come 
thousands of commercial and pleasure craft — tugs 
towing pulpwood and oil barges; commercial and 
sports fishing boats; shrimp trawlers; menhaden 
trawlers; Coast Guard light tenders, dredges, small 
freighters and yachts. Catering to these craft are 
boat yards, yacht basins, marine railways and mari- 
nas. The waterway served as a vital artery for trans- 
portation during WW II. 

Average annual commerce for the past 5 years in 
the AIWW North Carolina section was 1,911,000 tons, 
of petroleum products, logs and pulpwood, fish and 
shellfish, and other commodities. The waterway has 
been a great stimulant to the pulpwood industry, is a 
primary feeder for a large pulpwood processing plant 
at Georgetown, S. C, and was responsible for a large 
paper plant having located on the Upper Cape Fear 
River in N. C. 



The other deep-water port in the State is at More- 
head City where the harbor is only three miles from 
the open sea. The Federal project provides for a bar 
channel 35 feet deep to the Marine Terminals (State 
Docks) for ocean-going ships. 

Morehead City had its beginning as an ocean port 
and was actually founded in 1858 when the State of 
North Carolina completed a railroad that ran from 
upstate points to what was then the shore of outer 
Beaufort Harbor. It then became a port of call for 
steamships and the large volume of commerce that 
was handled in connection with the railroad for dis- 
tribution to interior points. 



EDITOR'S NOTE — At the Raleigh Office of the North Carolina State 
Ports Authority many telephone requests come in for Intracoastal 
Waterway Charts, which arc o production of the U. S. Deportment of 
Commerce (Sec Above). These charts arc for public sole and may be 
purchased in Raleigh from the Carolina Blue Printers, 116 W. Morgan 
Street or in Washington, D. C at the following address: Director, Coast 
ond Geodetic Survey, U. S. Deportment of Commerce, Washington, 
D. Ci 20230. Ask tor Chart by number. Price 75c. 



13 



.^LZr-'rt^* 



i FIVE BERTH TERMINAL TO OPEN SEA IS 
lED HERE. NOTE: BEAUFORT INLET ARROW AND 
MOREHEAD CITY IN FOREGROUND. 



W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth of 35 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds of 132,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry and 
two of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Five storage warehouses, totaling 
363,000 square feet, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
Additional 95.000 sq. ft. to be completed by November 
64 — Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 

terminal. „ 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full length 
of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Southern Rail- 
way freight car storage yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with de- 

Itachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton clamps, 
pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes. 

Tractors and trailers. 
GRAIN LOADING: Facilities for loading grain in ships 

or barges. Privately operated. 
LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 

loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 

also easy level access into transit sheds and warehouses. 
FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cya- 
nide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 

chambers, full mechanized. 
SERVICES : Served by the Southern Railway System and 

numerous highway motor carriers. 
SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 
SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 



Al Smith, Operations Manager 

WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,505 feet long with a 46-foot apron. Capacity — five 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water. 

NOTE ARROW ON RIGHT POINTS TO 3% MILLION DOLLAR NEW 
DOCK EXTENSION AS SEEN BY STATE PORTS ARTIST. THIS IS 
JUST BEGINNING, BUT $600,000 WAREHOUSE (LOWER LEFT) IS 
NEARING COMPLETETION. 






W 







BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water, and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds with 266,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Ten acres paved open storage, accessi- 
ble by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
trucks and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnet 
work and 2-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomotive 
crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING : Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



\ 




(5uten %z% 
means hello in 

©usseldorf . . . 
DDachotiia means business.' 

If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in 
Dusseldorf . . . see Wachovia. A Wachovia Interna- 
tional Specialist can help you do business better in 
West Germany ... or anywhere in the free world. 
His fingers are on the economic pulse of six conti- 
nents. He can smooth the way . . . right away . . .for 
buying and selling in every major world market. 
Wachovia was the first bank in the Southeast to win 
the U.S. Government's coveted new E-for-Export 



Award. Look to Wachovia International for all this 
. . . and more: trade leads/ credit reports/ untangling 
exchange regulations/ acceptance financing/ letters of 
credit/ collection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 







, as' „, »« 






o»* Jjool 



EDITORIAL 

This is the happy ending — -the clipping 
is only part of the story : 

One Saturday in early 1962, Governor 
Terry Sanford flew to Charlotte to dedi- 
cate the new BASF plant there. Mr. Leon 
Moody, the manager, asked the G overnor 
to try to get Charlotte to be made a "Port 
of Entry". Fortunately, in order to save 
travel money, a State Ports Authority 
staff member was traveling with the Gov- 
ernor. Knowing that a "Port of Entry" is 
a term used in U. S. Customs concerned 
with imports, and knowing that the State 
Ports only have a working relationship 
with customs, the Governor's words were 
— "Let's help Charlotte become a Port of 
Entry". 

Later the State Ports' man talked to the 
U. S. Customs Collector, who came to see 
the Governor — then the U. S. Collector 
went to Charlotte, The Charlotte Chamber 
of Commerce and others learned "you've 
got to do it yourself". They were encour- 
aged to finance the start with local funds. 
This presumably was done — then the rec- 
ords began to show the need, and Char- 
lotte became a "Port of Entry". 

This type of cooperative action is a 
trade mark of good government. Similar 
stories with similar happy endings may be 
found all over North Carolina in recent 
years. 



F.M.C. No. 49E 



The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 



1211 McCall Street 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. 0. Box 93 

Atando Station 

Charlotte. N. C. 28286 



Norfolk-Newport News, Va. 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond. Va. 
Travelers Bldg. 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customers' Brokers & Forwarders Asso. 



FJM.I. N«. 2454 
APPLICATION NO. 70 

waters shipping co. 

Of flCt: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 
CUSTOMS BROKER 

P. 0. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings frpm Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

109 South Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



16 



U. S. MARINES HIT THE BEACH 

F8E JET FIGHTERS BLASTED THE ONSLOW BEACH IN PREPARATION TO A BATTALION LANDING TEAM ASSAULTING THE BEACH. 





RALEIGH DELEGATION PASS 
IN FRONT OF A BATTALION 
LANDING TEAM (1.860) MEN 
WITH ORGANIZATIONAL 
EQUIPMENT. THE VISITORS 
RODE A FLAT-BED TRAILER 
CONVERTED TO A MOBILE 
BLEACHERS. 



LOOK FOR— 

IN THE NEXT ISSUE 

U. S. CO VST GUARD 

NEW BARGE TERMINAL 

MORE HISTORYLAND 

WHAT THEY SAY \MOUT US 

AND WHERE THEY SAY IT 

NEW OFFICE BUILDING 

GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES AND 

THE PORTS 



17 



r£*0 



V <*:)] 




') 



^&Xq\*a*mj\ 



Whenever shipping worries make you 
grouchy it's time to give one of our Sales 
Representatives a call. He'll have you 
feeling like a cub again in no time. Try us 
and see. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Serving American Exporters 
for Over 99 Years 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondelet Building 
JAckson 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

5 South Street 

SAratoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
WHitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 



W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice-President 



WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice-President 



J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 



LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



Offices At 

State Port Terminal 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 3-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919-762-8187 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



18 



GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 



MARINE INSURANCE 

Export Credit Insurance 



105 MURCHISON BUILDING 



PHONE ROger 2-9691 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 




BARBER LINE 



Specialists 
in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports to 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, Inc. 



GENERAL AGENTS 



New York 
Cleveland 

Chicago 



17 Battery Place 
Tri-Coast Shipping Co. 
Illuminating Bldg. 
Trl-Cooit Shipping Co. 
333 N. Michigan Ave. 



AGENT 
Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 




^orV 




>MN67 




IRST- 

CITIZENS 

BANKS TRUST 
COMPANY 



■ ■ J 

f \ 



: <d 



*C 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



19 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

Cusiom House Brokers 

Freight Forwarders 

F. M. B. No. 223 

F. M. C. No. 69 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 763-8271 
AND 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 726-5080 



W. S. R. BEANE 

President 

L. B. FINBERG 

Exec. Vice-Pres. 

MANAGER — MOREHEAD CITY 



R. H. FUTCHS 
Traffic Mgr. 
E. MAYO HOLMES 
Sec. & Treas. 

JACK TILLEY 



Browning Photo Center 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Finishers 

Color Black & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



JOHN L. BROWNING 



Phone RO 36263 
119 Marker Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



Walker Taylor Agency 



P. O. BOX 897 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. 0. DRAWER 31 


TELEPHONES 


726-6151 


726-6152 


CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 


William T. Davies 
Manager 


PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 


W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice President 


W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice President 


J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 


WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretory 


LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



20 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island- Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land — no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING IUIIDING. RAIEICH 



c 



MI 



WITH 

TL ET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Finer PA 6-5440 

Operators 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Suite 303 New Telephone Bldg. 




BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAI D 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 



PRESIDENTS 
AWARD 





A PRESIDENTIAL AWARD MADE TC 
PERSONS, FIRMS, AND ORGANIZATION 
WHO MAKE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBl 
TIONS TO THE EXPORT TRADE OF 
THEU.S EXECUTED IN THE NAME 
OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE U S. 



REGIONAL EXPORT 
EXPANSION COUNCIL 

■■HBWIMMMMilMHMMMMMlMIHl^^ 

SERVES NORTH CAROLINA 
APPOINTED BY SECRETARY OP COMMERCE 
21 EXPERIENCED WORLD TRADE LEADERS 
PURPOSE : 



Desire for U.S. goods 
increases in Far East 

By Neil C. Hurley, Jr. 

Chairman, National Export Expansion Council 




ONE OP40 COUNCILS THROUGHOUT THE US. 
ORGAN/ZED TO PROMOTE US. EXPORTS. 

HC. COUNCIL REGULARLY PLANS WAYS AND 
MEANS OP ENCOURAGING AND ASSISTING 
N.C. PIRMS IN DEVELOPMENT OP EXPORT 
MARKETS OR EXPANSION OP EXPORT SALESi 



MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

P. 0. Box 507 

Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX: 919-255-2995 



NEW YORK 

26 Broadway, Room 767 

New York 4, New York 

Telephone BOwling Green 9-1843 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

P. 0. Drawer 3037, Azalea Station 
Telephone ROger 3-1622 
TWX: 919-762-5661 



STATE PORTS 






^l)3i8« mmw • 




Secretary of Commerce Hodges, shown 
here while Governor of North Caro- 
lina steering a large ocean vessel. 
This photo by Hugh Morton we thought 
appropriate since he now has his 
hands on the wheel of the entire ex- 
port expansion program. 



Here is the N. C. Regional Export Expansion Council at its meeting in Greensboro prior to the visit 
of Secretary of Commerce Hodges. Left to right, seated: C. R. Harris of Charlotte; J. Edgar Kirk of 
Raleigh; H. Banks Newman of Winston-Salem; Joel New of Greensboro, of the Department of Com- 
merce; and J. F. McNulty of Asheboro; standing, William K. Woltz of Mount Airy; George Fowler of 
Burlington; Bruce Peabody of Raleigh; Walter J. Kelly of Southern Pines; L. F. Weeks of Raleigh; 
Marshall Fulp of Winston-Salem; Alonzo Edwards of Hookerton; William B. Little of Greensboro's cham- 
ber; Leonard Bauer of Pisgah Forest; Philip R. Peterson of Charlotte; David D. Blanco of Winston-Salem; 
and L. C. Bruce of Raleigh. (Record staff photo.) 

Absent from this photo is Jas. W. Davis, Executive Director of the N. C. State Ports, who serves 
as a member of the Regional Export Expansion Council also. Bruce Peabody is the coordinator of 
export sales for the N. C. Department of Conservation and Development and L. C. Bruce, Editor of 
this magazine, doubles as public relations director for the REEC. 



On October 4 the members of the Regional 
Export Expansion Council were summoned to 
Greensboro to meet with Secretary of Commerce 
Luther Hodges at a called meeting. Secretary of 
Commerce Hodges said that President Lyndon 
Johnson's efforts to expand export markets for 
United States industry was beginning to have a 
telling effect on the "balance of payments" strug- 
gle with world trade competition. He noted that 



in the last year exports were up 15% throughout 
the U. S., while imports only rose 7%. 

The North Carolina Council reported to the 
Secretary of Commerce that in the past three 
years eighty-seven firms have been helped to 
make export sales. The resulting increase in North 
Carolina is estimated to be one hundred million 
dollars annually. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Barber Lines 19 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad .... Inside Back Cover 

Browning Photo Center 20 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. __ Inside Back Cover 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler ... -20 

Tobacco Fumigation Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. .19 

Glasgow Hicks Co. —19 

Heide & Co., Inc. _.__ 20 

Hi-Page Co. 16 

Maersk Line — —-16 



Morehead City Shipping Co. ____ _ 20 

New Hanover County 18 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

North Carolina National Bank 1 

Surplus-Discount Co. 16 

Southern Railway System 18 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. __ 15 

Walker Taylor Insurance .'. 20 

Waters Shipping Co. _____ 16 

Wilmington Shipping Co. ____ 18 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc. _____ 18 




If your Business is Local . . . National ... or International 



the Bank to 

With more than 65 offices in 12 of the state's 
major cities, North Carolina National is 
ideally" set up to provide individuals and 
business firms with a full range of bank 
services throughout the Tarheel State... 

As a member of the Bank Wire System, 
North Carolina National Bank also main- 
tains direct contact with more than 200 
major banks in 63 of the nation's largest 
cities, to serve you instantly and confiden- 



seeisNCNB! 

tially in every state of the United States... 

And, thanks to the knowledge, experience 
and intimate worldwide connections of its 
International Department, North Carolina 
National Bank is uniquely qualified to serve 
your interests — swiftly and precisely • — 
in any corner of the free world. 

For conscientious bank service around 
the corner or around the world, inquire at 
any North Carolina National Bank office. 



NCNB 



North Carolina National Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Offices in: Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Statesvillc, Tarboro, Wilmington, Winston-Salem 




CANDIDATES 

FOR 

GOVERNOR 

SPEAK 




DAN K. MOORE, OF CANTON, 

DEMOCRAT CANDIDATE FOR 

GOVERNOR 



ROBERT L. GAVIN, OF SANFORD, 

REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR 

GOVERNOR 



I believe that it is imperative that we continue to 
expand the facilities of our State Ports. This expan- 
sion should be the concern of every North Carolinian 
for the benefits of modern port facilities will extend 
to every citizen. Industry throughout the State will 
certainly be benefitted and it is obvious that expanded 
facilities will be essential for the export of our sur- 
plus agricultural products. Simply stated, the eco- 
nomic growth that I envision for North Carolina will 
necessitate continued development of our ports. 

I have observed with interest the previous develop- 
ment of these important parts of our transportation 
system. 

Even in my home county in the west there are in- 
dustries whose commerce depends a great deal on 
ocean shipping. For this, and many reasons, I believe 
we should continue to expand our transportation 
systems, joining East and West together as rapidly 
as orderly expansion can be brought about. This will 
benefit our port traffic and help our economy to 
flourish. 



In 1860, when Wilmington was the largest city in 
the State, North Carolina enjoyed one of the largest 
ocean trades in the United States; but with the 
growth of transportation and distribution facilities 
in the post Civil War period, North Carolina was 
considerably neglected, and the State's ports fell be- 
hind the rest of the nation. 

The problems that face the North Carolina ports 
at Morehead and Wilmington-Southport are due to 
poor distribution to these ports. For North Carolina 
to achieve rapidly its proportionate shart of trade is 
very nearly impossible without an extensive, highly 
costly crash program to develop the traffic patterns 
of the entire State and the traffic beyond the State, 
north and south and through the middle west. 

The necessity to improve distribution includes, but 
transcends port development. We must consider dis- 
tribution the important economic development for the 
State. A long range program, with some short range, 
immediate, emergency steps must be undertaken to 
modernize the transportation facilities of North 
(Continued on page 16) 








New $600,000.00 storage warehouse at Morehead City. 



Warehouse nearing completion at N. C. State Port Terminal, 
Wilmington. 




STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 




FALL, 1964 



VOL. 10, NO. 3 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman, Pinehurst 
W. G. CLARK, JR., Vice-Chairman, Tarboro 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robcrsonville 
COOPER D. CASS, Winston-Salem 
LOUIS S. FICKLEN, Greenville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS address L. C. 
Bruce, Editor & Publisher — N. C. State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 

S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 
ANDREW JACKSON, III, Director of Engineering 



N. C. State Port Terminal— Operations 

P. O. Box 3037-Telephone 

ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 

AL C. SMITH 
Operations Manager 



Credits for photos go to Browning, U.S. Coast Guard, 
Seco, Hugh Morton, Bob Simpson 



CONTENTS 

Candidates Speak 

Ports Show Steady Progress 

History of N. C. Railroads 

Down the Historyland Trail 

Exportunities 

The U. S. Coast Guard Story 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

N. C. State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 507-Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suit 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Suit 303 New Telephone Bldg. 
Tel. 829-3855 

Box 149 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Communications 



Page 
2 
4 
5 
6 
9 
10 




COVER STORY 

The Viking Ship on our cover 
this issue can only be connected 
with the North Carolina Ports by 
inference. The Vikings sailed thou- 
sands of miles over unknown and 
unchartered seas. The voyage 
across the North Atlantic by the 
first Vikings who discovered Amer- 
ica and, as some believed, pene- 
trated all the way to ihe midwest 
was, for example, a more signifi- 
cant accomplishment than the first 
space orbit. No knowledge and 
research such as ours today was 
available to these early mariners. 
So on this issue we honor the 
Viking explorers of 1.000 years 
ago. (See page 6.) 



PORTS SHOW STEADY PROGRESS 




Members of the Board — North Carolina State Ports Authority. Left to right: (front row): E. G. Anderson, 
Robersonville; William Pharr, McAdenville; Joseph Foil, Greensboro; E. N. Richards, Raleigh; F. H. Ross, Jr., 
Charlotte; Cooper D. Cass, Winston-Salem. (Back Row): Louis S. Ficklen, Greenville; John M. Reeves, Pine- 
hurst (Chairman) and William G. Clark, Tarboro (Vice Chairman). Pictured here are citizens who serve vol- 
untarily to help develop the resources and commerce of our navigable streams and harbors. In the last four 
years development has been steady and profitable under this leadership. 



Since 1960 there have been two warehouses completed 
at Morehead City and one new and two renovated at 
Wilmington. Work is now beginning on an 1100 foot dock 
extension at Wilmington and large bulk handling facili- 
ties at Morehead City. By concentrating on leaf tobacco 
at Morehead City, 103,000,000 pounds of leaf were ex- 
ported there last year, and Wilmington emerged as a 
General Cargo Terminal of great importance to other 
industries of our state. The Wilmington Shipping Com- 
pany, who also operates at Morehead City, opened an 
office in Charlotte to expand near the Industrial Pied- 
mont, which generates a great part of North Carolina 
overseas trade. 

A small craft harbor was developed at Southport, and 
a valuable potential for waterborne commerce and sea- 
food processing industry was thus opened up in south- 
eastern North Carolina. 

In the Northeast coastland, an industrial park and in- 



land port potential at Elizabeth City was explored and 
acquired. 

At Fayetteville and Washington investigation and 
surveys are being conducted at the local level. A 100-acre 
site on the Cape Fear is held by the Ports Authority by 
gift from Cumberland County. Should river traffic con- 
tinue to develop, after flood control is accomplished, this 
site could become a valuable inland port terminal. In 
Beaufort County the development of waterborne com- 
merce on the Tar-Pamlico is looking up, as phosphate 
production begins. 

Meanwhile, with the blessings of the Council of State 
and the Advisory Budget Commission, through the Gen- 
eral Assembly, 4% million for Capital Improvements 
have been authorized and $1,500,000 in accumulated de- 
preciation reserves have been invested in new facilities. 
In the twelve years since activity began at both deep- 
water terminals in 1952, North Carolina has become a 
Maritime State. 



In a more serious mood — left to right and clockwise: John M. Reeves, W. G. Clark, Jr., Louis S. Ficklen, 
Cooper D. Cass, E. G. Anderson, E. N. Richards, William Pharr, F. H. Ross, Jr. and J. O. Foil. (Outside circle) 
E. E. Lee, Jr., Director of Commerce (I), and R. A. DeVane, Sec. and Treas. Comptroller (r.). 




HISTORY OF N. C. RAILROADS 



by MICHAEL J. DUNN, III 

(Professor at Belmont Abbey College, 

Historian, Beaufort & Morehead RR.) 




Busy serving the expanding commerce of More- 
head City, the State Port Terminal and Beaufort, two 
unusual railroads have seen their activities grow in 
step with development of that area. They are the 
Beaufort & Morehead Railroad and the Atlantic & 
East Carolina Railway, the latter an independently 
operated member of the Southern Railway's family 
of railroads. 

Just three miles in mainline length, the locally 
controlled Beaufort & Morehead is a railroad of 
superlatives: it is one of the dozen shortest complete 
railroads in the country, and one of the smallest to 
handle its own ratemaking, billing and car weighing; 
it held claim to being the shortest line offering 
passenger, mail, express and freight service until the 
late '40's; in terms of tonnage or cars handled, it is 
by far the busiest of this state's three little three- 
mile railroads. 

Dispatched by radio and emblazoned with the state 
flag and the slogan, "Route of the Jets", on the side, 
the two B&M diesel locomotives can be seen daily 
laboring in the yards and huge aviation fuel terminal 
on Radio Island facing the Port Terminal, or hauling 
cars in long strings from Morehead, where the B&M 
meets its only outside rail connection, the A&EC, in 
a yard before the Port Terminal entrance. The main 
line crosses two trestles (twenty percent of the 
entire B&M main line is bridges) to reach Beaufort, 
where it runs right down picturesque streets to 
reach its agricultural and industrial customers, most 
notable of which are fish plants, sawmills and a 
ready-mix plant. B&M was once planned to extend 
all the way to Cape Lookout and carry coal to fuel 
the merchant ships and navies of the world, but it 
never exceeded the first 3.17 miles built around 
1905-6 by the Norfolk Southern, which operated the 
connecting Atlantic & North Carolina lino under 
lease from 1904 to 1934. For a while after the lease 
terminated in 1934, NS operated profitlessly the 



Here is railroading as many of us remember it. An A&EC 
passenger train leaving Morehead in 1942 with the smoke, 
smell, cinders, and sounds of a bygone era. 




An A&EC Diesel makes its way cautiously down Hancock 
Street in New Bern. 

orphan segment that it still owned outright, but in 
lit:?.") sought to abandon it. Galvanized into action by 
the threatened loss of their railroad. Beaufort citi- 
zens rallied together and purchased and operated 
tin 1 line themselves from 1938 to 1947. when the 
present operator. A. T. Leary. leased the line, adding 
(Continued on page 17) 



DOWN THE HIS' 



* 




Legends of The 
North Star 



In the dawn of civilization, when men first developed the power of observation, primitive 
peoples looked to the stars for meaning and guidance. 

The legends of the stars, and the old beliefs of mankind about the stars, were very real to 
our predecessors who sought to understand the unknown world above them. 

The Norsemen who sailed uncharted seas carried with them their own legends of the North 
Star, which was their primary navigational guide. 

According to them, the Norse gods shaped the heavens and fixed all the stars in their places. 
Then the gods drove a huge spike into the center of the universe. Around this spike they 
made the heavens revolve. According to Scandinavian mythology, it is Veralder Nagli, or the 
"World Spike," which holds creation together. 

As the Norsemen sailed their ships across unknown oceans, the "World Spike" became their 
guide. Navigators of old, gazing at the heavens, could rest in the secure knowledge that the 
jeweled spike, the North Star, would always remain fixed in position, exactly where the 
mythological gods had placed it so long ago. 

Through the centuries, legends grew to explain the heavens . . . and particularly the North 
Star. These legends represent some of the earliest analytical thinking of ancient men who 
sought to understand and explain the Universe. 



ABOUT THE COVER PAINTING 

The cover art was originally executed by stone lithography, an exacting and almost 
lost art. The artist works directly on lithographic stones. One by one, the colors and 
glazes are laid down, with up to eighteen printings required on a hand press. The 
result is a subtle blending of colors, producing an effect unlike any other art form. 
The artist, Mr. Ture Bengtz, is Head of the Drawing and Graphic Arts Department 
of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts School. 

Mr. Bengtz' lithograph was reproduced on this magazine by conventional, four-color 
offset lithography. 



Dryland trail 



In the early days of North Carolina's transpor- 
tation development, "The Old Plank Road" was 
one of the first "Paved Highways". Made of pine 
lumber, it was considered quite an engineering 
feat in its day, and connected the capitol of the 
Highland Scots, Cross Creek, in Cumberland 
County (we know it today as Fayetteville) with 
the Moravian settlement of Salem, in what is 
now Forsyth County and the industrial city of 
Winston-Salem. 

The path of "The Old Plank Road" ran up the 
Cape Fear Valley, following the path of the Deep 
River through Randolph County and on to Win- 
ston-Salem. The coming of railroads and high- 
ways along the path of present U. S. #70 lead to 
the development of the "Piedmont Crescent". The 
area formerly served by "The Old Plank Road" 
did not reach the industrial potential it might 
have, had the principal east-west highway in early 
North Carolina not been preempted by other 
developments. 

As we journey down historyland trail, we see 
the beginning of a revival of this original trans- 
portation development. The deepwater terminal 
at Wilmington, plus the development of the Cape 
Fear River, with flood control, in the New Hope 
Dam area and the four-laning of a highway fol- 
lowing the path of USM21, all of which are in 
the foreseeable future, or are being developed in 
the immediate present, will "reincarnate" this 
colonial transportation system. "Cross Creek" 
would again be an inland port of importance and 
the industrial communities of Asheboro, Siler 
City, High Point, Greensboro and Winston-Salem 
would have another outlet to the East and South. 



•HCO*. 




Modern scene in front of ancient Fayetteville Slave Market. 




The House in the Horseshoe near Deep River in Moore County- 
of Whig Tory skirmish of 1781. 



Old Salem, the northern terminal of the "Old Plank Road" — as it looked in those days. 




South Atlantic and 
Caribbean Ports Associations 

The South Atlantic & Caribbean Ports Association, 
which has some sixty-eight members, including Puer- 
to Rico and the Virgin Islands, met October 12 and 
13 in Sea Island, Georgia. At the meeting Al C. 
Smith, Operations Manager of the North Carolina 
Port Terminal at Wilmington, was elected President 
for the coming year and Harry C. Jackson, Director 
of Traffic of the NCSPA, was elected Treasurer. 
Also serving on the Board of Directors for the coming 
year will be Jas. W. Davis, Executive Director, and 
E. E. Lee, Director of Commerce, NCSPA. The Asso- 
ciation has been greatly strengthened by a recent 
membership campaign. The North Carolina State 
Ports salutes its staff members who have been hon- 
ored by the Association. 



Wilshipco Opens 
Charlotte Office 

A branch office of the Wilmington Shipping Com- 
pany was established in Charlotte on August 3rd. The 
office is located in the Key Man Building at 1409 East 
Boulevard. 

Manager of the office is Clement V. Schrader, Jr., 
a native of Durham and a 1963 graduate of the School 
of Business Administration of the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mr. Schrader spent a 
number of weeks at the company's headquarters in 
Wilmington prior to assuming his responsibilities in 
Charlotte. 

Peter B. Ruffin, President of the Wilmington Ship- 
ping Company, stated that the office was established 
in Charlotte in order to give better service to the 
many shippers in that area who are making use of 
North Carolina ports for their imports and exports. 




Captain Breck Woldt, master 
of the Ozean/Stinnes Lines 
vessel Hasselburg, presenting 
a plaque to James W. Davis, 
Exec. Director of NCSPA, in 
commemoration of the 775th 
anniversary of the port of 
Hamburg, Germany. 




Mayor George Dill, Morehcod City, right, and Walter Friede- 
richs, operations manager of the Morehead City state port, left, 
assure Copt. Alexander Breckwoldt that some day the port of 
Morehead City will be 775 years old, as is his port of Ham- 
burg. 




The 850 passenger, gleaming white, 
completely modern, 18,100 ton, 
Trans-Atlantic liner S. S. ATLANTIC 
of the American Export Isbrandtsen 
Lines, will sail from the Wilmington 
terminal of the Ports Authority on 
January 9, 1965, for a 9-day cruise 
to the West Indies. The Greater 
Wilmington Chamber of Commerce is 
arranging for a business management 
seminar to be held aboard, for mem- 
bers of the North Carolina Merchants 
Association, as well as for members 
of several other trade associations of 
North Carolina. The sailing will mark 
the second appearance of the S. S. 
ATLANTIC at Wilmington, within a 
period of two years. 



EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel 15. New 

('. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950. idiom 408 
I'ost Office Hld K . 
Greensboro, N. ('. 



For Increased Sales and Profits 

Fruit, Vegetable Farms 

Hong Kong — Fresh oranges, apples, pears, grapes, 
honeydew. Direct purchase and exclusive distributor. 
Pioneer Trade Development Co., Ltd., 901 Fung 
House, Hong Kong. 

Meat Products 

Germany — Canned meat, all kinds; importing dis- 
tributor requests replies from U. S. meat packers only 
with price quotations cif Rotterdam or Hamburg. Di- 
rect purchase or agency. Wilhelm Wessel Junior, 
34-36 Ringstrasse, 465 Gelsenkirchen. 

Canning, Preserving Foods 

Germany — Canned fruits and vegetables, all kinds; 
requests replies from U. S. packers only with price 
quotations cif Rotterdam or Hamburg. Direct pur- 
chase and agency. Wilhelm Wessel, Jr., 34-36 Ring- 
strasse, 465 Gelsenkirchen. 

Iraq — Canned vegetables, fruits, jams, jellies. Di- 
rect purchase and agency. Iraq Trading Enterprise, 
W.L.L., P. 0. Box 214, 19/112 Bab Al-Agha, Baghdad. 

Philippines — Canned goods (milk and fish). Gatao 
and Co., Inc., 55-57 Plaridel Street, Cebu City. 

Grain Mill Products 

Philippines — Wheat flour. Gotao & Co., 55-57 Plari- 
del Street, Cebu City. 

Food Preparation 

Hong Kong — Refined soyabean oil in drums or by 
bulk tanker. Requires 5,000 long tons a year. Wellwin 
Trading Company, 124 Bonham Strand East, P. O. 
Box 14186, Hong Kong. 

Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

Germany — Terry cloth bathroom sets (towels, etc.), 
high quality goods only ; requests offers from jobbers 
or manufacturers with price quotations cif German 
ports or cif Rotterdam; Herbert Makowski, 19 Kron- 
prinzenstrasse, 4 Duesseldorf. 

Italy — Terry cloth towels; cotton sheetings (fine 
quality). Federico Sogaro, Corso Buenos Ayres 19, 
Milan. 

Yarn, Thread Mills, Products 

France — Nylon, orlon, rayon, other synthetic yarns. 
Direct purchase and agency. Ets. Gilbert Freres & 
Cie, 37 Rue Taitbout, Paris 9e. 

Apparel 

South Africa — All types of outerwear for children, 
maids, teenage and junior misses in wool, wool mix- 
ture, cotton, spun rayons, foam backs and other man 
made fabrics. Patti (Pty) Ltd. (manufacturer), 28 
Chiappini St., Cape Town. 

Apparel, Accessories 

Netherlands — All products used for manufacture 
and assembly of women's belts, such as plastic. 



buckles, furnishings; ready-made women's belt 'low 
and middle priced types i. Direct purchase and or 
agency. Requests replies from manufacturers only. 
Sample orders and prices requested. Xederlandsche 
Mode Industrie N.V., Aelbrechtskade 40, Rotterdam-G. 

Fabricated Textile Products 

Hong Kong — Wide range of drapery and upholstery 
fabrics. Yearly requirement — approx. 30,000 to 50,000 
yd.; requests replies from manufacturers only. Kaya- 
mally Ltd., China Bldg., 29A Queen's Rd. Central. 
Hong Kong. 

Household Furniture 

France — Modern, period furniture, bed-sofas. Di- 
rect purchase and agency. Sylvain Hohman, 58 Rue 
Saint-Antoine, Paris 12e. 

Industrial Chemicals 

England — Industrial chemicals for paper, plastics, 
paint and rubber industries; stabilizers, plasticisers, 
pigments, color, dies, excelerators, resins, extenders, 
secondary plasticisers. Croxton & Garry Ltd. 27 St. 
James' Rd., Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey. 

Soap, Detergents, Cleaning Preparations, 
Perfumes, Cosmetics 

France — Paint removers and other cleaning sol- 
vents. Direct purchase and agency. The Babb Co., 1 
Rue Lord Byron, Paris 8e. 

Plastic Products 

France — Plastic hoses for fuel, air, water, chemi- 
cals, other products. Direct purchase and agency. The 
Babb Co., 1 Rue Lord Byron, Paris 8e. 

Cutlery, Hand Tools, General Hardware 

Germany — Door locks with knobs instead of door 
handles; requests replies from U. S. manufacturers 
only with price quotations cif German ports or Rotter- 
dam. Direct purchase or agency. Richard Liebrecht. 
11 Caecilienstrasse, 4046 Buettgen. 

Spain — Hand tools such as hammers, handsaws, 
pliers ; hardware such as locks, bolts, shelf brackets ; 
all for do-it-yourself trade. Direct purchase and ex- 
clusive agency. Manuel Herrero Ayuso, Avenida Islaa 
Filipinas 30, Madrid (3). 

South Africa — Carpenters' hand tools, small power 
tools; hobby tools; builders' hardware; requests re- 
plies from manufacturers only. George Findlay & Co. 
Ltd., 20 Commercial St., Cape Town. 

Manufacturing Industries 

Gnatonala — Toys, housewares, gift items, ladies' 
underwear, electric appliances, notions; requests re- 
plies from manufacturers only. Carloz Paiz Ayala. 
President, Almacenes Paiz, S.A., 9a Calle 8-54. Zona 
1, Guatemala City. (Additional information may be 
obtained by writing Commodity Export Promotion 
Staff. BDSA-111. U. S. Department of Commerce, 
Washington. 1). C. giving IR Code TM-1). 



THE U. S. COAST GUARD STORY 




Courtesy of 5th District PIO 

The history of the 
Coast Guard goes back 
more than a century and 
a half to the beginnings 
of the United States. 
The Nation dates from 
the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, July 4, 1776. 
but the constitutional 
government we know 
today did not start un- 
til 1789. That was the 
year George Washing- 
ton was inaugurated as 
first President and that 
the first Congress con- 
vened in New York, the first capital. The very next 
year, on August 4, 1790, Congress passed and Wash- 
ington signed a bill authorizing the construction of 
"ten boats" for guarding the coast against smugglers. 
This was the beginning of the Coast Guard. It was 
known in those first days, however, as the Revenue 
Marine. Later it was called the Revenue Cutter Ser- 
vice. Not till 1915 was it given its present famous 
name. But despite name changes it has kept its iden- 
tity as an organization, and in point of continuous 
service the Coast Guard is considered the oldest of 



Rear Admiral Oscar C. 
Rohnke, United States 
Coast Guard, Comman- 
dant Fifth District. 



the Nation's seagoing armed forces. 

The father of the Coast Guard was Alexander 
Hamilton, the first Secretary of the Treasury. It was 
he who asked Congress to provide a fleet of armed 
cutters to insure the collection of tonnage dues and 
import duties from vessels entering United States 
waters. 

To sail these ships, Hamilton engaged crews of "re- 
spectable character." For each cutter, Congress autho- 
rized one master, not more than three mates, four 
mariners, and two boys. The masters received $30 a 
month, first mates $20, second mates $16, third mates 
$14, mariners $8, and boys $4. All received rations, 
which included among other items a "half gill of rum. 
brandy, or whisky, 1 quart salt, 2 quarts vinegar, 2 
pounds soap, 1 pound candles." 

COAST GUARD IN WAR 

Plan 1, Acknowledge. That was the dispatch re- 
ceived by all Coast Guard units on the morning of 
April 6, 1917. It meant that the United States was 
at war with Germany and that the 15 cruising cutters, 
200-odd officers, and 5,000 men of the Coast Guard 
were to go into action with the Navy. The naval action 
was almost exclusively undersea warfare and the 
Coast Guard was in the thick of it, convoying cargo 
ships and screening transports. 





Portsmouth, Va. — The Coast Guard cutter Mendota (WPG-69) is pictured in Hampton Roads steaming for her homcport, Wilmington, North Carolina. 



One of the most famous antisubmarine units of the 
Atlantic Fleet was Squadron 2, Division 6, composed 
of the cutters Ossipee, Seneca, Yamacraw, Algonquin, 
Manning, and Tampa, based at Gibraltar. 

A tower look-out at the Chicamacomico, N. C, Coast 
Guard Station saw the British tanker Mirlo torpedoed 
7 miles off shore. The station's motor surfboat made 
three trips through burning gasoline and northeast 
seas in gathering darkness to save 36 British seamen. 

The Coast Guard suffered greater losses, in pro- 
portion to its strength, than any of the other United 
States armed forces in World War I, 

WORLD WAR II 

In World War II the Coast Guard hit its peak 
strength. It had 802 vessels (over 65 feet) of its own, 
and in addition manned 351 Navy and 288 Army craft. 
Shore stations increased from 1,096 to 1,774. And at 
the end of June 1945, its personnel numbered 171,168. 
Of these nearly half served on ships. There were only 
10,000 more men ashore than at sea, many of the 
shore billets having been taken over by 45,000 tem- 
porary reservists and 10,000 Spars. Killed in action 
were 572. 

COAST GUARD IN PEACE 

Between World Wars the Coast Guard had grown. 
This was due in part to prohibition, for, though en- 
forcement of the laws against smuggling liquor was 
unpopular, unpleasant, and dangerous, the Coast 
Guard had never before enjoyed such generous appro- 
priations. Despite retrenchment after prohibition, the 
service was three times its World War I size in 1940 
and well equipped to handle events that foreshadowed 
our entry into World War II. 

The Coast Guard fleet that has been back on its 



~ X£* 




Comn 
richs, 



ander Harold D. Muth, U. S. Coast Guard, and Walter 
Morehead Port Operations Manager, talk over the term 



Fricdc- 
inal. 



peacetime job under the Treasury Department since 
June 1, 1946, is a far cry from Alexander Hamilton's 
"ten boats." There are now more than 60 distinct 
classes of ships and nearly 20 different types of air- 
craft. The word cutter no longer means a topsail 
schooner like the Massachusetts of over a sentury and 
a half ago. Technically, the term "cutter" is reserved 
for only named Coast Guard vessels. But. generally, 
cutter means only one thing to the public — a Coast 
Guard ship, any Coast Guard ship. 

The largest cruising cutters are 327-footers, some- 
times called the "Secretary" class because they are 
named for past Secretaries of the Treasury. These 
have been augmented by 311-footers built during the 
war as Navy seaplane tenders. There are also 256-foot 
and 250-foot classes of cruising cutters. Then there 
are smaller patrol cutters, ranging from 165-footers 
to harbor tugs. 



11 



U.S. COAST GUARD 

One of the big jobs of Coast Guard cutters is 
serving as ocean station vessels. This requires them to 
cruise for 21-day periods in areas 10 miles square 
so that meteorologists can gather on-the-spot data to 
relay to the Weather Bureau. Forecasts and storm 
warnings based on such data permit trans-ocean ships 
and planes to avoid dangerous weather conditions, but 
the cutters who do the work have to stick to their 
posts and ride out the heaviest seas in foulest weather. 

Aviation has greatly extended the helping hand of 
the Coast Guard. Rescue operations that were once 
restricted to coastal waters because of the limited 
range of earlier equipment, can now be carried out on 
the ocean. Giant Marlin flying boats can go 1,500 
miles from shore, land on the ocean to pick up sur- 
vivors of an accident or someone from a ship who 
needs medical attention ashore. 

The Coast Guard has had a hand in aviation from 
the very beginning. When the Wright brothers made 
their historic first flight at Kitty Hawk in 1903, three 
members of the nearby Kill Devil Lifeboat Station 
were on hand. One of them snapped a picture of the 
plane while it was in the air, and after the flight, when 
a wind flipped the plane over and threatened to wreck 
it, all three grabbed it and helped secure it safely. 

Marine safety is one of the Coast Guard's major 
peacetime responsibilities. Through its Merchant Ma- 
rine Safety program, the Coast Guard makes its con- 
tribution toward safety for American vessels and the 
persons they carry. Believing that 'An ounce of 
prevention is worth a pound of cure," the Coast Guard 
enforces many Federal laws relating to the safety of 
vessels and carries out periodic inspections to see 
that they are observed. 

The names of the North Carolina Life Boat Stations 
of the U. S. Coast Guard, when recited in sequence 
as they appear on the Coast Guard map, reminds us 

Caffeys Inlet Lifeboat Station, Kitty Hawk, discontinued 23 March, 1964. 



NORTH CAROLINA 
LIFEBOAT STATIONS 




Al C. Smith, Operations Manager, Wilmington, and Commander Neale 
Westfall, U. S. Coast Guard. 



of passages from Tom Wolfe, the North Carolina 
author who loved the sound of Tarheel names. The 
long history of courage and devotion to duty of the 
men who served the life boat stations on the Outer 
Banks of North Carolina is one of the exciting chap- 
ters of our maritime history. 

Beginning at the North Carolina line, the names 
of the life boat stations are: Wash Woods, Pennys 
Hill, Currituck Beach, Whalehead Island, Poyners 
Hill, Caffeys Inlet, Paul Gamiels Hill, Kitty Hawk, 
Kill Devil Hills, Nags Head, Bodie Island, Oregon 
Inlet, Pea Island, Chicamacomico, Gull Shoals, Little 
Kinnakeet, Big Kinnakeet and Hatteras Inlet. 

We do not have the space to tell here — and the 
story has been told well by many others such as Bill 
Sharpe, David Stick and Carl Goerch, of the indi- 
vidual heroics that have made these stations famous. 
However, with the coming of modern transportation 
and modem communications, equipment and tech- 







CGC Chilulo, whose home port is Morchcad City. 

niques; the bridging of the inlets for easy land trans- 
portation ; since the modern advance in oceanography 
and ocean traffic safety, many of these famous life 
boat stations have been closed and the property sold 
to private owners. A few are still very active, the 
replacements for their service continues to be some- 
what glamorous, such as the Air-Sea Rescue Squadron 
station at Elizabeth City, North Carolina, which has 
become the largest Air-Sea Rescue Station on the 
South Atlantic. The growth of North Carolina's ocean 
shipping traffic and the elimination of nautical haz- 
ards from the shipping lanes have been, in a large 
measure, possible because of the activity of the U. S. 
* Coast Guard. 

No longer is Cape Hatteras a grave yard for ocean 
vessels. The tons of cargo that move along the North 
Carolina coast and into North Carolina harbors move 
with ease and efficiency by virtue of this service, 
"The Coast Guard". 




*=•=* 



Herbert Bonner Bridge 
Oregon Inlet 




The Coast Guard ensign. 



The cutter Spencer sinks a Nazi sub. 



13 



^^fes., fa 






' £ ^4^-^h. 



"»: Sff 



r •*■ . . 



tSB? 



FIVE BERTH TERMINAL TO OPEN SEA IS 
NOTE: BEAUFORT INLET ARROW AND 
CITY IN FOREGROUND. 



W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with- a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth Of 35 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds of 132,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry and 
two of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Five storage warehouses, totaling 
363,000 square feet, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
Additional 95.000 sq. ft. to be completed by November 
64 — Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 

terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full length 
of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Southern Rail- 
way freight car storage yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with de- 
tachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton clamps, 
pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Facilities for loading grain in ships 
or barges. Privately operated. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
also easy level access into transit sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cya- 
nide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 
chambers, full mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern Railway System and 
numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



STATE FORT TERMINAL 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 



Al Smith, Operations Manager 

WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,505 feet long with a 46-foot apron. Capacity — five 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water. 

NOTE ARROW ON RIGHT POINTS TO 3y 2 MILLION DOLLAR NEW 
DOCK EXTENSION AS SEEN BY STATE PORTS ARTIST. THIS IS 
JUST BEGINNING, BUT $600,000 WAREHOUSE (LOWER LEFT) IS 
NEARING COMPLETETION. 




BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water, and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds with 266,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE : Ten acres paved open storage, accessi- 
ble by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
trucks and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnet 
work and 2-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomotive 
crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING : Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 







KAAHMEPA 
means hello 

in Athens . . . 
Wachovia means business! 



If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in 
Athens . . . see Wachovia. A Wachovia International 
Specialist can help you do business better in Greece 
... or anywhere in the free world. His fingers are 
on the economic pulse of six continents. He can 
smooth the way . . . right away . . . for buying and sell- 
ing in every major world market. Wachovia was the 
first bank in the Southeast to win the U.S. Govern- 
ment's coveted new E-for-Export Award. Look to 



Wachovia International for all this ... and more: 
trade leads/ credit reports/ untangling exchange regu- 
lations/ acceptance financing/ letters of credit/ col- 
lection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 







Standing tall and stately on the Raleigh skyline, the eleven- 
story Wachovia Bank and Trust Company building nears 
completion. The distinctive new building is expected to be 
ready for occupancy by the end of the year. Alternating 
vertical panels of precast stone, marble and dark-tinted glass 
emphasize the classic simplicity of the building's design and 
accent its height. 



Government- Seized Gun Runner 



u 1 


kM 





74 ft. Cruiser, 3 toilets, 2 showers, one 2 bed 
main state room, two guests state rooms, saloon, 
galley and crew quarters. $19,500 includes com- 
plete reconditioning, with new guarantee, of both 
diesel engines, or $15,500 as is condition. 
SURPLUS DISCOUNT CO. 
339 S. Wilmington St. 
Phone 834-4517 E. O. Willard Raleigh, N. C. 



F.M.B. No. 2454 
APPLICATION NO. 70 

waters shipping co. 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 
CUSTOMS BROKER 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



(Gavin, continued from page 2) 
Carolina. With this program, we can build North Carolina 
to be the industrial center of the South; and in no other 
way can the ports of this State be as important as they 
deserve. 

The ability of a manufacturer to import his necessary 
raw materials is equally important as his ability to dis- 
tribute his product. The program which I would propose 
for the ports of North Carolina, therefore, would lend 
much more emphasis to the entire transportation system; 
and, thereby, provide new sources of revenue for these 
ports. 

We could create a pressure throughout the State to 
develop the ports, because they are vitally necessary to 
the economy of our entire State. The necessary capital 
financing for any additional port expansion would be 
much easier to get from the Legislature if we were able 
to establish that there was a sound financial basis for it. 

There is no question that this is a long range and 
costly program, but it must be done, contingent only on 
the State's ability to pay. In its long range prospects and 
effects, it will prove vastly important to the State in 
terms of fiscal revenue. 

I can see no reason for not taking beginning steps in 
the next biennium. 



F.M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

1211 McCall Street 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. 0. Box 93 

Atando Station 
Charlotte, N. C. 2S2S6 



Norfolk- Newport News, Va. 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldg. 



Member National Customs Brokers 
of America, Inc. 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



& Forwarders Assn. 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings frpm Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

109 South Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



16 




Number 85 of the B&M crossing the Newport River bridge headed for Beaufort. 



one final distinction to the line which he has since 
rebuilt completely: the Beaufort & Morehead is the 
only railroad known whose authorization by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission to do business is 
given just to one single individual. 

Long known unofficially as the Mullet Line, the 
111-year-old Atlantic & East Carolina Railway just 
this September rounded out a quarter-century of 
independent operation, following an 86 year era of 
near-bedlam under alternate private and governmei! 
operation. Built in the 1850's by a state-controlled 
corporation, the Atlantic & North Carolina Railroad 
(which still holds title to the railroad but rents it 
under lease to the Atlantic & East Carolina Ry.), 
the 96 mile line from Morehead to Goldsboro was a 
pawn in the Civil War, when armored trains patrolled 
it and Sherman rode an A&NC train to the sea. After 
that it fell upon lean years and a couple receiver- 
ships, and until 1900 was something of a political 
football. Plans to lease it to private operators fell 
through in 1873, 1881 and 1896. From 1904 to 1934 
Norfolk Southern operated it. 

In 1939 after a gloomy half-decade of operating 
the line itself, the state cheerfully leased the track 
to an operating company, the Atlantic & East Caro- 
lina, newly formed under Sanford railroader H. P. 



Edwards. Military development and later port and 
industrial growth brought the A&EC unprecedented 
prosperity along with paradoxical touches of sad- 
ness, as the line, a pioneer since 1946 in the opera- 
tion of streamlined diesels, dropped for the final 
time the fires in its last smoke-belching steam loco- 
motives, and as the last passenger train bearing 62 
riders pulled into Goldsboro on March 31, 1950, a 
victim of progress in the form of competing buses 
and private autos. 

When Edwards and associates in 1957 sold the 
stock of their A&EC operating company to the 
Southern Railway, it was an entirely rehabilitated 
plant that the new owners got. The widely heralded 
sale tied the line to other state-built trackage now 
also operated by the Southern. The Southern then 
began running trains behind its own engines right 
through from the Piedmont to the port city with only 
a switching stop and change to A&EC crews in 
Goldsboro. A&EC trains leave each end of the road 
at dusk and meet at New Bern, one of four major 
industrial centers served by the A&EC. There, as at 
Goldsboro and Kinston, A&EC switch engines daily 
collect and distribute cars at industrial sidings; at 
Morehead City the road engine switches the State 
Port Terminal and industrial trackage. 



A Sperry Rail Detector car making a check of the A&EC rails on the swing span of the Trent River bridge. 




If you're looking for a "sure thing" when 
you're shipping to, from or within the 
South, give Southern the haul. We take 
the gamble out of transportation. Try 
us next time and see for yourself. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Serving American Exporters 
for Over 99 Years 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondelet Building 
JAckson 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 
SAratoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
WHitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 



W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice-President 



WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice-President 



J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 



LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 
Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



Offices At 

State Port Terminal 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 3-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919-762-8187 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



11 ' 

AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



18 



GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 



MARINE INSURANCE 



Export Credit Insurance 



PHONE KOner 2-9691 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 




BARBER LINE 

Specialists 
in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports to 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, Inc. 



GENERAL AGENTS 



New York 

Cleveland 

Chicago 



17 Battery Place 
Tri-Coast Shipping Co. 
Illuminating Bldg. 
Trl-C6oit Shipping Co. 
333 N. Michigan Ave. 



AGENT 
Morrheod City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 








Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



19 



HEIDE AND CO., INC. 

Custom House Brokers 

Freight Forwarders 

F. M. 8. No. 223 

F. M. C. No. 69 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 763-8271 
AND 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 726-5080 



W. S. R. BEANE 

President 

L. B. FINBERG 

Exec. Vice-Pres. 

MANAGER — MOREHEAD CITY — JACK TILLEY 



R. H. FUTCHS 
Traffic Mgr. 
E. MAYO HOLMES 
Sec. & Treas. 



Browning Photo Center 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Finishers 

Color Black & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



JOHN L. BROWNING 



Phone RO 36263 
119 Market Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



Walker Taylor Agency 



P. O. BOX 897 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship r.nd Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. 0. DRAWER 31 


TELEPHONES 


726-6151 


726-6152 


CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 


William T. Davies 

Manager 


PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 


W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice President 


W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice President 


J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 


WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 


LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



20 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island -Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolino Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING BUILDING. RALEIGH 



crp 




WITH 
ET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 
Charles Piner & Teen Pincr PA 6-5440 

Operators 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Suite 303 New Telephone Bldg. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 



EXPORT TOBACCO 




i w- 




NORTH CAROLINA 
FUMIGATES 

• NEATER 

• FASTER 

• CLEANER 




MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

P. 0. Box 507 

Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX: 919-255-2995 



NEW YORK 

26 Broadway, Room 767 

New York 4, New York 

Telephone BOwling Green 9-1843 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

P. 0. Drawer 3037, Azalea Stati 
Telephone ROger 3-1622 
TWX: 919-762-5661 



» 



Norfh Carolina Sfat« Library 
Raiaigh 



1 iTt&tfA Cah&tuao 

STATE PORTS 



Doc 



Winter, 1965 




THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE, Monday, January 4, 1965 



Hodges Puts "64 GNP at $622 Billion: 
Estimates Payments Gap at $2.5 Billion 



Washington Bureau 

WASHINGTON, Jan. 3 — The 
full-year gross national product 
and balance of payments results 
for 1964 were made public over 
the weekend by Commerce Sec- 
retary Luther Hodges in his an- 
nual review and outlook apprais- 
al of the nation*s economy. 

Mr. Hodges, who found the 
1965 outlook promising a contin- 
uation of high-level economic ac- 
tivity, put the gross national 
product at S622 billion, compared 
with the S623 billion which the 
Administration had set for the 
year. The shortfall came in the 
fourth quarter, owing chiefly to 
automobile strikes. 

Payments Figure 

The Commerce Secretary said 
the balance of payments deficit 
in 1964 was around $2.5 billion 
on incomplete data, plus or mi- 
nus a few hundred million dol- 
lars. 

This figure includes the S138 
million scheduled payment Brit- 
ain was to have made on its debt 
to this country at the end of 
December but had to postpone 
because of the strain on its re- 
serves of the November-Decem- 
ber sterling crisis. 

The Administration had been 
hoping to narrow the balance of 
payments deficit on regular 
transactions from S3. 3 billion in 
1963 to S2 billion or less in 1964. 

Mr. Hodges noted that the fa- 
vorable developments the gov- 
ernment had counted on were 
partly offset by "a considerable 
rise in the outflow of U. S. capi- 
tal and by a decline in the inflow 
of foreign capital." 

Bullish Forecast 

In making a bullish forecast 
for next year, Mr. Hodges cited 
separate industry outlooks pieces 
which a Commerce Department 
agency, the Business and De- 
fense Services Administration 
will shortly release. 

According to these, another 
good advance in GNP should 
generate gains of more than 10 



per cent for 10 of 50 manufac- 
turing industries covered, while 
another 13 are expected to show 
gains of 5 to 10 per cent, and 
the remainder are all expected 
to show some gain over 1964. 

Automobile production is ex- 
pected to reach a record eight 
million units in 1965, compared 
to 7.5 million-plus in 1964. 

Machine tool shipments are ex- 
pected to rise another 17 per 
cent in 1965, Mr. Hodges said, 
bouyed up by both domestic and 
foreign demand. This will, how- 
ever, be a smaller gain than the 
21 per cent rise in 1964. 

Mr. Hodges took note of two 
clouds on the economic horizon. 

Residential construction's out- 



look "presents some uncertain- 
ty." New housing starts are ex- 
pected only to equal 1964, b u t 
other building could push total 
new construction up 3 per cent. 

Inventory accumulation 
showed signs of increasing to- 
ward the end of 1964, the Com- 
merce Secretary conceded. On 
the inventory outlook for 1965, he 
commented: 

"A higher level of output and 
sales next year suggests some 
increase in inventory accumula- 
tion over the rather low levels 
of 1964. The pattern within the 
year may be importantly influ- 
enced by stockpiling in anticipa- 
tion of a possible steel strike in 
the Spring." 



COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY 
EXPAND WITH PORTS 

We welcome to Raleigh the General 
Assembly of North Carolina for 1965. 
The investment made by previous Gen- 
eral Assemblies in the State Port Termi- 
nals and facilities have meant much to 
the economy of the state. Each year 
over $12,000,000.00 in new business is 
generated by deepwater transportation 
into the commerce and industry of our 
state. 




INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Barber Lines 19 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad „_ Inside Back Cover 

Colorcraft Studios 20 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. Inside Back Cover 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler 20 

N. C. World Trade Association Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 19 

Glasgow Hicks Co. 19 

Heide & Co., Inc. 20 

Hi-Page Co. , 17 

Maersk. Line . 17 



Morehead City Shipping Co. 
New Hanover County 



-_.._20 
18 



N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. 

North Carolina National Bank 

Southern Railway System 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 

Walker Taylor Insurance _ 

Waters Shipping Co. 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc. 



Inside Back Cover 

15 

18 

1 

20 

17 

18 

18 







moshi-moshi 
means hello 

in tokyo . . . 
wAChovu means Business! 



If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in 
Tokyo . . . see Wachovia. A Wachovia International 
Specialist can help you do business better in Japan . . . 
or anywhere in the free world. His fingers are on the 
economic pulse of six continents. He can smooth the 
way . . . right away ... for buying and selling in every 
major world market. Wachovia was the first bank in 
the Southeast to win the U.S. Government's coveted 



new E-for-Export Award. Look to Wachovia Inter- 
national for all this . . . and more: trade leads/ credit 
reports/ untangling exchange regulations/ acceptance 
financing/ letters of credit/ collection of drafts. 



BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



Dan K. Moore Inaugurated January 8, 1965 
Succeeds Three Maritime-Minded Governors 



*t\ ^ 

















I believe that it is imperative that we continue to 
expand the facilities of our State Ports. This expan- 
sion should be the concern of every North Carolinian 
for the benefits of modern port facilities will extend 
to every citizen. I believe we should continue to ex- 
pand our transportation systems, joining East and 
West together as rapidly as orderly expansion can 
be brought about. 

Gov. Dan K. Moore 



GOVERNOR DAN K. MOORE OF CANTON, WHO WAS INAUGU- 
RATED JANUARY 8 BEFORE PROBABLY THE LARGEST 
GATHERING OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINIANS EVER TO 
ASSEMBLE IN RALEIGH. 





GOVERNOR LUTHER H. HODGES. WHO RECENTTY RETIRED 
AS U. S. SECRETARY OF COMMERCE TO RETURN TO HIS 
BELOVED NORTH CAROLINA. HODGES IS CONSIDERED TO BE 
THE MAN WHO RESCUED THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
PORTS FROM RETROGRESSION. 



GOVERNOR TERRY SANFORD (LEFT) WITH JOHN M. REEVES. 
CHAIRMAN OF THE PORTS AUTHORITY. REEVES WAS FIRST 
APPOINTED CHAIRMAN BY THEN GOVERNOR LUTHER 
HODGES IN 1957 AND REAPPOINTED BY SANFORD. UNDER 
THIS LEADERSHIP THE STATE PORTS AUTHORITY'S FACILI- 
TIES AND COMMERCE OBTAINED STATURE. 




THIS IS THE LATE GOVERNOR KERR SCOTT TALKING TO THE 
LATE JOHN MOTLEY MOREHEAD AT THE WILMINGTON 
TERMINAL IN 1052. HIS FRIENDS SAY. "KERR SCOTT SAVED 
THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS WHEN THEY WERE 
DYING ON THE VINE." 




STATE PORTS 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION C 



^ 



WINTER ISSUE, 1965, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 10, NO. 4 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman, Pinehurst 
W. G. CLARK, JR., Vice-Chairman, Tarboro 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
COOPER D. CASS, Winston-Salem 
LOUIS S. F1GKLEN, Greenville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS address L. C. 
Bruce, Editor & Publisher — N. C. State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce ir Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

I JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

f 

ANDREW JACKSON, III, Director of Engineering 

State Port Terminal— Operations 

P. O. Box 3037-Telephone 

ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 

AL C. SMITH 
Operations Manager 



Credits for photos go to Colorcraft, Bob Simpson 

CONTENTS 

Page 

Gov. Dan K. Moore 2 

New Waterside Industrial Area 4 

Down The Historyland Trail 6 

Exportunities 9 

Waterside Industry — Cape Fear River 10 

Visit of Nuclear Powered Ship 12 



New Company From Abroad 



16 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 507-Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

W. H. FR1EDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



9f<rtti CaAo&ta 

STATE PORTS 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suit 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 
Tel. 829-3855 

Box 149 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Communications 




COVER STORY 

The picture on the cover was 
furnished by the American Ex- 
port-Isbrandtsen Line and shows 
the graceful N S Savannah on the 
high seas. 

This makes interesting compari- 
sons with the previous cover, 
showing the Viking Ship on the 
high seas, denoting two thousand 
years of progress in maritime 
power and construction. (See 
Story, Page 12). 

Interesting also is that change 
in design in the last twenty-five 
years shows more progress than in 
the first fifteen hundred. 




THIS FORMER NAVAL AIR FACILITY IS NOW THE WEEKSVILLE FACILITY OF THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 
AUTHORITY THE TWO HANGARS HAVE RECENTLY BEEN USED AS NAVAL SEAPLANE OVERHAUL AND MODIFICATION 
CENTER OF THE HAYES INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION. 

PORTS AUTHORITY OBTAINS WATERSIDE 
INDUSTRIAL AREA... POTENTIAL INLAND PORT 



In October it was announced that the State Ports 
Authority had purchased 812 acres of land known 
as the Weeksville Naval Air Facility. This property 
is located on the inland waterway, near Elizabeth 
City, North Carolina. The purchase was approved by 
the Governor and Council of State on October 15. 
The acquisition of the property is an opportunity 
for development of waterside industry in the north- 
eastern section of North Carolina. In ten years a 
barge terminal or inland port in easy access to the 
deepwater port at Hampton Roads could give North 
Carolina three maritime outlets along its vast coast 
line. 

With the present surge of waterborne and water 
related industry. Ninth Carolina now has a deep- 
water terminal at Wilmington; a deepwater terminal 
at Morehead City; a small craft harbor and com- 
mercial craft terminal at Southport, and privately 
owned terminals operating as an inland port in 



Fayetteville; there is considerable future traffic in 
view on the Pamlico River near Washington, North 
Carolina and a revived interest in water-borne traf- 
fic in Elizabeth City which could bracket the entire 
coastline. 

North Carolina, as a maritime state, developed 
faster in the last twelve years than in the previous 
150. The foresight required to develop this maritime 
transportation recommends the entire coastline be 
included. 

The deepwater terminals at Morehead City and 
Wilmington established in 1952, gave North Caro- 
lina's highway and rail transportation an outlet to 
overseas trade, which was needed for the "push" in 
export development that began in 1961 nationwide. 

Having railheads on the Southern at Morehead 
City; the Coast Line and Seaboard at Wilmington, 
the Elizabeth City purchase now gives the State 
Ports Authority access to a fourth major railroad, 










GIANT LTA HANGAR, ALL STEEL CONSTRUCTION 900 FT. X 300 FT. AND 230 FT. HIGH, MAKING IT THE TALLEST STRUC- 
TURE IN NORTH CAROLINA BY ABOUT 10 FT. UNTIL WACHOVIA'S NEW BUILDING IN WINSTON-SALEM IS COMPLETED. 




INTERIOR OF PRODUCTION LINE OF THE HAYES INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION AS PM5 NAVAL SEAPLANE GETS A 
NEW LOOK. 



the Norfolk & Southern. The potential development 
of this industrial site and the subsequent fringe 
benefits that- would accrue from a waterside and 
water-oriented industry in the area would mean a 
great deal to the entire economy of North Carolina. 
Available at the site for use are two 300,000 sq. ft. 
buildings. These were former LTA hangars and 



their height makes it possible to adapt them to heavy 
fabrication. The Authority hopes to obtain inquiries, 
and any information concerning this property can 
be obtained by addressing: "The Public Information 
Office, N. C. State Ports Authority. P. O. Box 149. 
Raleigh, N. C." or calling "829-3855— Raleigh" Area 
919. 



DOWN THE HIS' 




"RIDGECREST TO OLD FORT HIGHWAY" 
THIS IS U. S. 70 AND TEMPORARY INTER- 
STATE 40 AS IT DESCENDS IN BEAUTIFUL 
PANORAMA FROM RIDGECREST TO OLD 
FORT. 



OLD FORT STOCKADE STOOD HERE. AFTER THE FRENCH 
AND INDIAN WAR IT WAS THE LAST STRONGHOLD OF THE 
EARLY SETTLERS BEFORE CROSSING THE BLUE RIDGE INTO 
THE LAND OF THE CHEROKEE AND THE TENNESSEE INDIAN 
TRIBES. FORT IS TO BE RESTORED AS AN HISTORIC SITE 



For the past year this magazine has tried to show 
the part of transportation in the history of North 
Carolina. It is appropriate that on the occasion of 
a new Governor from Western North Carolina, more 
or less isolated until recent times, that we look at 
the historyland trail in the Catawba Valley. 

Slicing down from the crest of the Blue Ridge 
into the Catawba Valley is a modern, four-lane, mas- 
ter piece, of engineering called Interstate #40. The 
four-lane road from Ridgecrest to Old Fort was engi- 
neered and completed by the State of North Carolina 
prior to the completion of the link from Old Fort 
to Marion. 

Earlier in the century Colonel A. B. Andrews of 
Wake County sparked the construction of a railroad 
up the Catawba Valley, climbing the Blue Ridge 
from Old Fort to Ridgecrest in what is considered to 
be the most scenic rail line in the United States, pass- 
ing through seven tunnels in full view of Mt. Mit- 
chell, and bursting over the Continental Divide into 
the valley of the "Land of the Sky." 

Old Fort got its name from a fort that was built 
in pre-revolutionary days to defend the settlers of 
the Catawba Valley in the area of McDowell County 
and to keep the lines of transportation open into 
the Cherokee country and Tennessee, where such 
colorful characters as "Nolichucky Jack" Sevier and 
Colonel Joseph McDowell, heroes of Kings Moun- 
tain, tread the paths of history. 

This Catawba trail is probably the principal tie 
that bound what is today Western North Carolina 
to the rest of the state when Tennessee, beyond the 
Smokies, seceded to Statehood in the late eighteenth 
century. 




,*>g *R 



) 



RYLAND TRAIL 




PLFASANT 
GARDENS 

HOME OF JOStPH Mc 
DOWELL. INDIAN FIGHTER 
HERO Of KINGS MOM- 
TAIN. 







THIS IS THE CARSON HOUSE, LOCATED IN THE UPPER 
CATAWBA VALLEY, BETWEEN MARION AND OLD FORT, NEAR 
OLD U. S. 70. THE CARSON HOUSE IS FAMOUS SINCE 1800 AS 
THE HOME OF JOHN CARSON. HERE WAS BORN SAMUEL 
PRICE CARSON, WHO WAS IN THE NORTH CAROLINA SEN- 
ATE THREE TERMS; U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 
FROM 1825 TO 1833, AND WAS THE FIRST SECRETARY OF 
STATE OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS. LIST OF FORMER 
GUESTS IN THE HOME INCLUDE DAVID CROCKETT, ANDREW 
JACKSON, JOHN C. CALHOUN AND NATHANIEL MACON. 



pleasant garden is the name of the valley of the 
upper catawba river. here lived colonel joseph 
Mcdowell, one of the heroes of kings mountain and 
first member of congress from western north caro- 
lina, the house was built by his father prior to 
1754. a few miles distant is the old greenlee house 
of the same period. each place was built as a 
stronghold for defense of the valley and the 
trading road. 



In the period around 1750 to 1790 Old Fort and 
the trading trail, following the path of what is to- 
day U. S. #70 and Interstate #40, kept communica- 
tions open between the west and piedmont sections 
of North Carolina. 

Perhaps the next four years will see final plans of 
early pioneers completed by tieing of the maritime 
coast and the State Port Terminals to the mighty In- 
terstate 40 and Interstate 85 highway complex. 



MODERN MAP OF OLD CATAWRA TRAIL SHOWING 1-40 
RUNNING THROUGH THIS BEAUTIFUL LAND. 



**v\ 






l&jjotlSpnng| 



^ s6Pk ° ]&S,*£L n Min!yS L 



MAD I SON, 

ft.iiipni . 



. I Bald/ , 



Micavwek 



L J." 

ml - 

iLuc 



ISpring-Creek 




Woodlawn 



jTrust 



Waternitl, 
Lake HI 



Busic^XMC DOaVELL^ C"" 



in 

t Hi (5o9" 



1 

/ 

/Cree 



yl5 \ Ccl ° lC<-obrr»» 

Pensacola 1 'if " 
N Murchison ff^^yrf^-W 

) Ml. M.UMI T 6}' j^T (226 

'Si n 
19 /)7 xrBarnardsville K H,gh..i Pi ,„ Port 
' — 'Dillingham 

Stocksville ^ „, 

.Weavervillecroogr .7/ lyz^ 

Co,d."/f*£ff ' ^V K\\ PleaSant Ga 'f e , 

Montreat / pj ^^V Marion 

• 0j9a 11 (jv 3 » I " m *"•< y^ - 

\\ 6 i ^*l II Black Nlountainj-—, _,_ 

o„d v ■ Ashe ville^feldFt^X^^ „ SL. 



mvitle 
Falls X ^olleltsville|^' Valmead^ 

^"™r\, » •♦■Lenoir-, 

Rshtord .. ttS '\L \ 

/ I ^ ^ Q8T) 

& J % Table Rock 



\' 



s 



JCrabtree 



Alexander 

U NlCtC/' Bl 

Leicester^ a\ (19 

trl£3L 



omit 



Glen 
Alpine.' 

Brideewalei, 



•■ \ B 



y 



^ G3mCwel |/ Wh.tn^VGT! 

3:iaIV 

mile Fallsy '" 

k mil/, (MmfMsQ I5' i= ^L / 

3 MnroantnnO^VrTTs RuTKerfoid^ Rrpdhissj 
S!E r i^K^,Co,le g e nelw spn«W- 

LongymC 

Ra/a -^ 

R K E\ / 

Pleasant Grove ^\ / 



r 




2" I Casar„ 
% 



GilkeyYo x ?#wesl- •"■" - ■ |Q?L, 

I ™nsler „ | lis Po|K ^\ 







kK 




f\ '^^Jfeepsville + 

^^^o^incolnton 

BelwoodX \ mi) 
Fallstonl 



3f7T, J Xantori / U ' ,he y CandlerTJV, Hj'f^j VP . J ,~ - ■* N JL-- — 

fflfewillpST @T 6 l2 /^ <3i ^V'^lV ^fairview -^ r Thermal City f 

TmiIIsrISjJP Edney»H^"'TaL"ru^r -^ ^ t^JX* 

' "v^^%jlainHmiie«^ ' 1 ^^ -f 

X . „ H /E N^Q^^JrS ON/ A N ? Ru,he " ^J*KiSp,ndal,V 60S..C 

>0 N M ??tej«- na 7^^T^ F /Wa,F,a^ock ""ISpnnJ^ ' 

^ ^1 / DavidsonRrver Penrose 

^27 ^' -f Brewaw^Pisgah 

I / t^V Forest utlelRiver —„ ,. v %W ift KL p; ~ t >< "ams ., -vchflsrdey , 



DoabJi Sh «E 



•e„/ 00,esb ' , ' > Shelby ; 



La»ndal( 



\~> 



Htih 



Kings 



NORTH CAROLINA EXPORTS RIS1 




KRIGCTS & STRATTON CORP., MILWAUKEE, WIS., AND MEADOWS MILL CO 
NORTH WTLKESBORO, N. C, WERE AMONG THE PARTICIPANTS IN THE 
FIRST U.S. NATIONAL EXHIBITION HELD IN GUATEMALA CITY, GUATEMALA 
NOV. 7-22. HERE, U.S. AMBASSADOR JOHN O. HELL AND DR HELEN l' 
MERRILL, JACKSONVILLE EDUCATOR WHO PRESENTED THE UNITED STATES 
AT THE EXHIBITION, VIEW A BRIGGS & STRATTON GASOLINE ENGINE AND 
A MEADOWS MILL HOUSEHOLD MILL. 

IT WAS -EYES RIGHT 1 — "EYES LEFT"— AS THOUSANDS OF GUATEMALANS 
ATTRACTED TO THE EXHIBITION, WATCHED DEMONSTRATIONS OF UNIQUE 
ELECTRONIC TEACHING AIDS AND AN ARRAY OF LABOR-SAVING MACHINES 
FOR FACTORIES AND FARMS. "EDUCATION IN PROGRESS" WAS THE THEME 
OF THE EXHIBITION DEVELOPED BY THE U.S. COMMERCE DEPARTMENTS 
BUREAU OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE. THIS WAS THE 154TH TRADE 
FAIRS PRESENTATION STAGED SINCE THE U.S. TRADE FAIRS PROGRAM WAS 
INAUGURATED IN 1954. 




LT. GOVERNOR ROBERT W. SCOTT 
WAS INAUGURATED ON JANUARY X 
THIS IS HIS FIRST ELECTED PUBLIC 
OFFICE. HOWEVER, A BRILLIANT CA- 
REER IN PUBLIC SERVICE AS MASTER 
OF THE GRANGE AND HIS LEADERSHIP 
IN AGRICULTURAL AND CONSERVA- 
TION OF RESOURCES AFFAIRS INDI- 
CATE HIS GUIDANCE OF THE SENATE 
AND OTHER OFFICIAL DUTIES AS LIEU- 
TENANT GOVERNOR WILL HELP KEEP 
NORTH CAROLINA ON THE ROAD TO 
PROGRESS. 

LT. GOVERNOR SCOTT IS THE SON OF 
THE MAN WHO IS CREDITED WITH 
LAUNCHING THE PRESENT NORTH 
CAROLINA STATE PORTS PROGRESS 
WITH THE FIRST APPROPRIATION IN 
1949, AND THE DEDICATION OF THE 
TERMINALS IN 1952— THE LATE GOV- 
ERNOR AND SENATOR W. KERR SCOTT. 



GREENSBORO RKCORl> 
Greensboro, N. C 



Boat Harbor To Boost Town's Economy 



SOUTHPORT. Aug. 12 Wi- 
The sleepy North Carolina 
coastal town of Southport, tiny 
neighbor of the Port of Wil- 
mington, is waking up to a new 
boom. 

Mayor Eugene Tomlinson Jr. 
and his town of 2,038 already 
feel the effects of Southport's 
small boat harbor newly under 
construction. 

Official groundbreaking was 
scheduled today but town busi- 
nesses have been reaping new 
profits the past few months 
from workmen on the project. 
"The impact is small now," 
said James W. Davis, executive 
director of the State Ports Au- 
thority. "But when the harbor 
is completed the impact on the 
economy will be tremendous." 
The harbor, being financed 
by a $500,000 state bond issue, 
is scheduled for partial com- 
pletion on or about March 1 
of next year. A hurricane storm 
barrier and berths for 110 small 
boats are included in phase 
one of construction plans. 

Southport, adjacent to the In- 
tercoastal Waterway and within 
a few miles of the Atlantic, 
also expects a boost to her 
economy with new ferry ser- 
vice across the Lower Cape 
Fear River to Ft. Fisher on the 
Outer Banks 

Only last week. Gov. Terry 
Sanford made a special trip to 
Southport to announce plans tor 



the $300,000 ferry which is ex- 
pected to be in operation by 
next year's tourist season. 

Mayor Tomlinson heralded 
the ferry service as the single 
most important development 
for the economy of Southport 
and Brunswick County in 50 
years. 

The overland roule 'o Ft. 
Fisher from Southport, nfnth to 
Wilmington and then sooth 



through Carolina Beach, is a 60 
mile trip. The ferry will run 
six miles and the trip will take 
about 30 minutes. 

At his Southport news confer- 
ence. Gov. Sanford said a food 
processor and other industries 
are taking a new interest in the 
coastal town. 

"We are on the road to seeing 
a new day in this part of North 
Carolina," he said. 



The ferry service he said, 
will be a link in a seashore 
highway along the Outer Banks 
and coast from Virginia to the 
South Carolina line. 

Meanwhile, Mayor Tomlinson 
and Southport already are brac- 
ing for an influx of newcom- 
ers. The town is making plans 
to expand its town limits for 
the tirst time since it was 
founded. 




SKETCH: This is an artist's sketch of Southport's small boat harbor. The sched- 
ule calls for groundbreaking today and completion of phase one, including berths 
for 110 small boats and a hurricane storm barrier, next March. 



..,. r J, >()] ' VM " CASS ' T ' ORTS AUTHORITY MEMBER. AND CHAIRMAN OF THE SOUTHPORT PLANNING COM- 
MITTEE WITH MEMBERS E. G. ANDERSON AND L. S. FICKI.F.N. ANNOUNCED RECENTLY THAT PLANS ARE 
££&S2J££)[ SJ? ' OKMAI - DEDICATION OF NEWLY CONSTRUCTED SMALL CRAFT HARBOR. (See Cut). 
SOUTHPORT WILL BE FEATURED IN THE SPRING ISSUE OF THIS MAGAZINE ON APRIL 30 



IBOVE $700,000,000 DOLLARS IN 1964 



EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 19.',0, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



For Increased Sales and Profits 

Food 

Spain — Evaporated milk, baby foods, cereals, fruits, 
juices, canned meats for resale to retail outlets. Sra. 
Ma. Matilde Llompart, Representative, Casa Exim- 
trade (importer, wholesaler, distributor), Serrano 51, 
Madrid 4. 

Canning, Preserving Foods 

Iraq — Canned vegetables, fruits, jams, jellies. Direct 
purchase and agency. Requests replies from manu- 
facturers. Mowaffak Drug Stores Co. (Div. of M. T. 
Irani Sons Co.) (importers, wholesaler, contractor), 
Ameen Square, Rashid St., Baghdad. 

Textile Goods 

Germany — Polyprophylene cores for wire ropes used 
in shipping and fisheries. Direct purchase or agency. 
Desires exclusive representation. Geo. Gleistein- 
Strasse (P. 0. Box 95), 282 Bremen-Vegesack. 

Men's, Youths', Boys' Suits 

Sweden — Men's ready-to-wear suits of all kinds in 
summer and winter-weight materials. Bergmans Her- 
rekipering AB (importer, retailer), Odenplan 69, 
Stockholm. 

Sawmills, Planing Mills 

Italy — Douglas fir; pitch pine. Fratelli Paganoni 
(manufacturer, distributor), Viale Monza 240, Milan. 

Industrial Chemicals 

Portugal — Intermediates, dyes, color lakes, toners. 
Requests replies from manufacturers. Direct purchase 
and agency. E. Brunner & Ca. Lda. (importer, whole- 
saler, agent), 13-2° Rua de Aviz, Oporto. 

Synthetic Materials 

Pakistan — Nylon resins: chemicals used in manu- 
facture of nylon, synthetic yarn, twine; approximate- 
ly $10,000. Fazal Nylon Mills Ltd., 30 The Mall, La- 
hore. 



Paints, Varnishes, Lacquers, Enamels 

Gibraltar — Oil paints, enamel finish, lacquers and 
varnishes. Car Sales & Services Ltd., Sun Drive Car Household Appliances 

Hire Ltd., 63, Main St. 

Spain — Paints, lacquers, varnishes, paint sprays, ac- 
cessories. Direct purchase and agency; requests re- 
plies in Spanish or French. Francisco Parres Puig 
& Sons, CI. O'Donnell 41, Melilla. 



Glass, Glassware 

Spain — Inexpensive machine made decorative glass- 
ware; glass jars, vases; requests replies in French or 
Spanish. Jacob Benamu Bennarroch, Lopez Moreno 

10, Melilla. 

Cutlery, Hand Tools, General Hardware 

Pakistan — Furniture hardware, except casters; ap- 
proximately $2,500. Irrish Corp. (Registered), Kha- 
waja Electric Market, 13 Brandreth Rd., Lahore. 

Farm Machinery 

France — Lawn mowers for distribution in France. 
Spain, Africa ; direct purchase and exclusive agency. 
Societe Yvan Beal & Cie., 61-63 Rue du Resoort, Cler- 
mont-Ferrand (Puy-de-Dome). 

Spain — Cotton picking equipment, automatic vibra- 
tor (olive and peach picking equipment) to shake 
fruit down. Sr. D. Jose Marino, Director, Eximtrade 
S.A., Serrano 51, Madrid 4. 

Spain — Harvesting machines for wheat, tractor 
drawn. Sr. D. Salvador Nicolas Arellano, Import Di- 
rector, Ferraria, S.A. (agent), Batalla del Sabado, 38, 
Madrid 1. 

Spain — Grain cleaning, storage equipment. Sr. Jose 
Garcia Coca, Administrative Manager, Comercial 
Espanola de Intercambios Mundiales, S.A., Segasta, 

11, Madrid 4. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Brazil — Used machinery for preparing ice cream 
and concentrate egg yolk; desire complete installation. 
Papeis Gomados Lider e Conexo S. A.. Caixa Postal 
4686, Sao Paulo. 

Nigeria — -New and used machinery for production of 
"English style" biscuits. Requests quotations from 
manufacturers and/or dealers. Mr. H. B. Chanrai. 
J. T. Chanrai & Co., P. O. Box 39. Port Harcourt. 

Nigeria — New and used machinery for weaving 
woolen textiles. Machinery to be usable also for weav- 
ing woolen and synthetic yarns to make a product 
similar to "Dacron and Wool" from the U.S. Requests 
replies from manufacturers and or dealers. Mr. H. B. 
Chanrai, J. T. Chanrai & Co., P. O. Box 39. Port 
Harcourt. 



Pakistan — Electrical appliance parts, accessories, 
such as switches, cables, power and distribution trans- 
formers; approximately $10,000. Irrish Corp. (Regis- 
tered), Khawaja Electrical Market. 13 Brandreth Rd.. 
Lahore. 



WATERSIDE INDUSTRY 




A Bit of History . . . 

Riegel's first mill started operations in 1862 in 
Finesville, N. J. By 1907 Riegel had 4 paper mills in 
New Jersey, and these mills are still in operation. 
They are major producers of glassine and grease- 
proof papers and also make hundreds of specialty 
industrial papers. 

In 1937 Riegel bought about 140,000 acres of tim- 
berland near Bolton, N. C. in anticipation of building 
a pulp mill in this area, but it wasn't until 1950 
that construction of the mill started. Our pulp mill 
started operating in December, 1951. It expanded 
rapidly, and in 1958 we started up our paper mill. 

Riegel now has many other plants throughout the 
country. We have folding carton plants in Atlanta, 
Newark, N. Y., and St. Louis. We have eight flexible 
packaging plants, including three in North Carolina. 
Riegel also owns the Bartelt Engineering Company 
of Rockford, Illinois, which makes automatic pack- 
aging machinery. 

Riegel's sales now exceed $110,000,000 per year. 



Facts and Figures 

We employ over 1,000 people. 

Our local payroll is about $8,400,000 a year. 

We purchase over $3,000,000 worth of services, 
supplies, and fuel annually in Southeastern North 
Carolina. 

We spend over $9,500,000 per year for pulpwood 
alone. 

We thus contribute over $20,500,000 annually to 
the economy of Southeastern North Carolina. 

Riegel owns or leases about 330,000 acres of wood- 
lands, most of which are located in Southeastern 
North Carolina. 

We have woodyards at Black Creek, Faison, Holly 
Ridge, Lumberton, Maxton, New Bern, Pittsbord, 
Polkton, Rockingham, Sanford, Stedman, Stanley and 
Tabor City (all in North Carolina) and Timmonsville 
(.South Carolina). 

We raise 12-15 million pine seedlings annually in 
North Carolina. 



THE PICTURE BELOW, LEFT, WAS TAKEN FROM THE RIEGEL FIRE TOWER NEAR BOLTON IN 1938. AT RIGHT IS A PIC- 
TURE OF THE SAME AREA IN 1963. 



'" Y'vVV* y ' 'V ■">''•' v-V ^flk^i,- :, '•'.'. * 







V'fc.,^ |4»ii«ii«Wi ^jwfrtay A , ! &», 













CAPE FEAR RIVER 



RIEGEL PAPER CORP. 

PULP AND PAPERBOARD DIVISION 
RIEGELWOOD, NORTH CAROLINA 



C. E. HARTFORD 
Vice President & General Manager 

We produce about 950 tons of pulp and paper every 
day. 

On the average day our paper machines produces 
a sheet of paper 18 feet wide and about 170 miles 
long. 

We burn up to 12,000,000 cubic feet of natural 
gas a day and are the biggest user of natural gas 
in North Carolina. 

About 35,000,000 gallons of water are used daily. 

Enough power is generated from our own power 
plant to supply a city of 100,000 people. 

We sell about $600,000 worth of by-products each 
year (turpentine and tall oil soap). 

Riegel's pulp and paper are shipped to customers 
all over the world and are among the leading exports 
from the Port of Wilmington. 

Market pulp The bleached plup is formed into a 
sheet and run through either of two pulp dryers. 
Moisture is evaporated and the dried pulp is cut 
into square sheets. 

These sheets are stacked, pressed into bales, and 
wrapped for shipment. 

About 580 tons per day of pulp are sold as "mar- 
ket pulp". Market pulp is shipped to paper mills all 
over the world for conversion to paper. 

Paperboard About 360 tons of pulp per day is 
made into paperboard on our large modern paper 
machine, the "Carolina Belle". ("Paperboard" is an 
industry term for heavy grades of paper.) 




THE SEEDLING AHOVE IS ONE OF 12-15,000.000 RAISED 
EACH YEAR IN OUR NURSERY AT LUMBERTON. 




Ep? 


-. 


w^^ 


/ 




1 i 

L 








A 



WEIGHING SHEETS OF PULP AS THEY 
COME FROM A PULP DRYER. 



BALES OF RIEGEL PULP BEING LOADED 
FOR OVERSEAS SHIPMENT AT THE PORT 
OF WILMINGTON. 



THE "CAROLINA BELLE' 





Nuclear Ship Visiting Tar Heel Port 



The N.S. Savannah arrived in Wilmington this week following 
her trip down the coast from New York City. The ship, which is 
operated for the government by American Export Isbrandtsen Lines, 
recently rompleted her fourth good-will cruise to Europe. The pur- 

Asheville Citizen 



pose of the nuclear powered ship's overseas visits is to demonstrate 
to the world that nuclear power can be put to peaceful and construc- 
tive use. The N.S. Savannah will be in Wilmington through Dec. 29 
and will be open for public inspection Saturday and Sunday. 



Six Day Visit Of Nuclear Powered 
Ship Creates State -Wide Interest 



THE SAVANNAH HAS A CAPACITY FOR 10,000 TONS OR 746,200 CUBIC FEET OF 
CARGO IN HER SEVEN HOLDS. 



SHIP'S OFFICER JOINS A YOUNG LADY 
IN A GAME OF SHUFFLEBOARD. THE N.S. 
SAVANNAH'S SWIMMING POOL IS ALSO LO- 
CATED ON THIS PORTION OF THE PROME- 
NADE DECK. 




Cruises On Nuclear Power 



N. S. Savannah Is Unique Among Merchant Ships 



By JIM ALLEN 

Editor. The Daily Star 
Just about the only non 
mique thing about the Nuclear 
ihip Savannah is the conven 
ional nature of the huge ves 
el's structural appearance. 
Other merchant navies may 
e able to boast of merchant- 
men of comparable design and 
rith comparable cargo and 
aesenger carrying capabilities. 
Comparisons end right there. 

A silky-smooth, mid-week 
ride up the Cape Fear River 
on the $80 million nuclear ship 
made that unequivocally 
clear. 

The ciicumstances of the Sa- 
annah's conception and con- 
duction >vere unique. 
Her mission is unique. 
Her power plant is unique. 
And it is the latter that will 
Ive the N.S. Savannah a rank- 
ig spot in maritime history. 
The Savannah was construct- 
i with federal funds as a joint 
roject of the U.S. Atomic En- 
■gy Commission and the U.S. 
larltime Administration. 
The ship, which will be berth- 
i at the N.C. Ports Authority 
jcks at Wilmington through 
uesday, has a five-pronged 
lission: 

1— To demonstrate to the 
orld the employment of nu- 
ear power as an Instrument 



Shelby Daily Star 



of peace for the benefit of man- 
kind. 

2— To bring the power of the 
atom into the market places of 
the world in peaceful trade and 
commerce. 

3 — To demonstrate that nuc- 
lear-powered merchant ships 
are dependable and safe. 

4 — To stimulate early solutions 
to such problems as interna- 
tional liability and indemnifica- 
tion and to achieve acceptance 
for nuclear ships in world ports. 

5— To give the Maritime Ad- 
ministration and the Atomic En- 
ergy Commission the oppor- 
tunity for assessing the contri- 
butions of atomic power to the 
progress of the American Mer- 
chant Marine. 

To wrap It all np In lay 
terms the United States gov- 
ernment, through the N. S. 
Savannah, Is attempting to 
overcome the bad press which 
has plagued the atom since 
the atomic blasts which 
brought the Japanese Empire 
to Its knees In World War II. 

During a brief interview with 
ships officers in the Savannah's 
luxurious lounge on Wednesday 
morning, Chief Engineer Thad 
deus Kedzierski put it this way: 

"When most people think or 
electricity, they don't think 




Sovonnoh, merchont vessel, orrivej ot North Corolino port for four-doy visit. 

Nuclear Ship Docks at Wilmington 



By CHARLES CRAVEN 

WILMINGTON - She's hitting 
lust about every major port in 
the world these days • but she's 
□o tramp. 

The nuclear ship Savannah - 
a Rcntle lady If there ever was 
one - is paying a social cal! to 
Wilmington and North Caro- 
lina. She moved in trim-lirifd 
m.-ijrsty up the Cape Frar River 
WKlnrsiiuy morning and tied up 
at the State docks. 

The first and only nuclear- 
powered merchant ship will re- 
main in Wilmington (our days, 

The News and Observer 



and will be open (or public in- 
spection 

The Coast Guard Cutter Cape 
Upright carried a number o( 
newsmen out to the Savannah as 
sne moved into the Cape Fear 
estuary. As both ships moved 
up the river, the cutter came 
aicnrjside the Savannah and the 
DeWfUUO boarded her. 

During the morning trip up 
the river, the reporters and pho- 
tographers were (eted at a cock- 
tail party and luncheon on the 
sumptuous enclosed veranda 
which looks through polished 
glass out on the swimming pooL 



The ship Is on a voyage that 
will take her to Charleston, 
S. C„ Jacksonville, Fla„ San 
Juan, Puerto, Rico, Greece and 
Turkey Carrying some 18 pas- 
sengers and cargo, she sailed 
(rom New York. 

John E. Done, manager o( the 
Savannah project (or the Ameri- 
can Export Isbrandsten Lines. 
wMrh operates the ship (or the 
Federal Government, described 
the vessel as a good-will am- 
bassador (or the u. S. "Every- 
where we go, we are warmly 
welcomed." he said. "In Ant- 



werp 50,000 people came to tee man Alloa Leo 
us. be said. Bonner. Tory 

Bone sjid even the people of ship as a pioneer id • new Mjit 
Lisbon, Portugal, gave the ship of t*a commerce. 
a warm welcome - and the Bonner is chairman of the 
people of Porugal have not been Hcoe Merchant Uanae and 
too complimentary to the U. S. Fisheries Committee, and Len- 
of late. oon u a member of thai corn- 

Bob Thompson of Soulhport, mittee. 
tV nver pilot who brought the James Morton of Naji Bead, 
Savannah up the channel, said representing Secretary of Com- 
■It was a unique experience meree Luther Hodges said the 
She bandies amazingly well. No Savannah is • prime example 
strain at alL" of the peaceful use of atomic 

The Savannah was met al enertv. 

the State docks by a host ol WllmmJIton yuyor 0. 0. Albv 

dieailaxies. including Congress- brook p7eV«i«i (he key to the 

dtf to Capt. David B Mc 

Michael, master of the Sarat- 



into her berth, i . 

o.er Rith School RGTC band 

saluted ber with marches. Abo 
on band to receive the Savan- 
nah's officers and crew was 
Coast Guard L Cmdr Joe Fax. 
captain of the Port of Wtlmmg- 




mil Ot UK ai.wi n i n iw owwr 

S carry Wednesday monunf. 
ship s second assistant en- 
gineer. Herbert Phelps. 2t. was 
stricken with a perforated ulcer. 
The Coast Gurad Cotter Cap* 
L'pnght, commanded by Li- J. 
f, Glenn 



i as she mowed toward 

lbs mouth of the Cape Fear. 
and took Phelps abouxlJTbs 
cutter took htm to 



Following the dockside care- 
monies, a reception wsa held an 
board the ship Also dunaw tkw 
afternoon, the Bahcock and Wil- 
cox Co.. builder of the ahap'i 
reactor , pw a Chr istmas party 
for 6 haurtif apped cfaflorea. 

to, feTricenxa «i is. Sa- 

■Mi E 55 L-. >»=•. 

inpootflxUtT of tb. SUrtust 
Admtafatrattco of lb. I' S r» 
portotflC of O iiiii mho. and no 
l\ S. Atomk Efefrfv Cams. 

a] - <.-» mi Dad •■ ■! ■ 
no. 

lb. aacan- fart a tb. Saaaa- 
aah'i roactor roaspnaei ap- 
pnmmatrtj I7*» pooaoa of «a- 
rxsod rohaa injo. A onajo 
cor. of tb. hjrt wfl aaJMf 
ot_£*> r~^-£? li c;*— *'. '^* 

v'-jp i.-- ana ■ -. ■ Ml nan 



NOW EN ROUTE TO WILMINGTON, where a eolorful Christmas greeting awaits her, the world's first nuclear merchant ship, the N. S, Savannah, is shown on 
the high seas. The Savannah has been visiting foreign ports on its mission to convince world wide maritime interests of the potential value in the peaceful uses 
of atomic energy. It has been favorably received in numerous foreign ports and its operation has exceeded predictions. Among activities scheduled for the Wil- 
mington visit of the ship will be a Christmas party on board soon after it docks, Wednesday, for 100 handicapped children under the sponsorship of local schools 
and the Wilmington Management Club of The Itabcock & Wilcox Company, designer and builder of the Savannah's nuclear power plant. The public may tour tbe 
ship Saturday , Sunday and Monday, December 26, 27 and 28. between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. and Tuesday, December 29. from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. before 
the ship departs to Charleston, S. C. 

The Concord Tribune 



13 




THE STATE PORTS AUTHORITY AT MOREHEAD CITY IN AN 
UNUSUAL VIEW. NOTE NEW 96,000 SQ. FT. WAREHOUSE, 
MAKING A TOTAL OF 458,000 SQ. FT. IN BACKGROUND IS 
MARSH ISLAND, LOCATION FOR NEW BULK COMMODITY 
TERMINAL. 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth Of 35 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS : Three transit sheds of 132,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry and 
two of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Five storage warehouses, totaling 
458,000 square feet, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
— Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 

terminal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full length 
of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Southern Rail- 
way freight car storage yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with de- 
tachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton clamps, 
pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 

GRAIN LOADING: Facilities for loading grain in ships 
or barges. Privately operated. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
also easy level access into transit sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cya- 
nide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 
chambers, full mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern Railway System and 
numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 



Al Smith, Operations Manager 

WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,505 feet long with a 46-foot apron. Capacity — five 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water. 

UNUSUAL VIEW OF WILMINGTON STATE PORT TERMINAL, 
LOOKING UP RIVER. NOTE CITY OF WILMINGTON IN UPPER 
RIGHT BACKGROUND. NEW DOCK EXTENSION UNDER CON- 
STRUCTION IN LOWER LEFT FOREGROUND. ALSO VISIBLE, 
NEW 96,000 SQ. FT. WAREHOUSE IN CENTER. 




BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water, and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds with 266,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE : Ten acres paved open storage, accessi- 
ble by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
trucks and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnet 
work and 2-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomotive 
crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



i l~h rr — ""- -"-* 



•-*" - - .- - .. ,. - ..^ .. _^ — ^_ 




If your Business is Local . . . National ... or International 



the Bank to 

With more than 65 offices in 12 of the state's 
major cities, North Carolina National is 
ideally set up to provide individuals and 
business firms with a full range of bank 
services throughout the Tarheel State... 

As a member of the Bank Wire System, 
North Carolina National Bank also main- 
tains direct contact with more than 200 
major banks in 63 of the nation's largest 
cities, to serve you instantly and confiden- 



seeisNCNB! 

tially in every state of the United States... 

And, thanks to the knowledge, experience 
and intimate worldwide connections of its 
International Department, North Carolina 
National Bank is uniquely qualified to serve 
your interests — swiftly and precisely — ■ 
in any corner of the free world. 

For conscientious bank service around 
the corner or around the world, inquire at 
any North Carolina National Bank office. 



NGNB 



North Carolina National Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Offices in: Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Statesville, Tarboro, Wilmington, Winstorr-SalM) 




■flmnn^Hi 



TWO VENEER LOGS FROM THE SAME TREE, WEIGHING 30,500 POUNDS, THE LARGEST TO EVER LEAVE THE PORT AT 
MOREHEAD CITY, BOUND FOR GERMANY. THEY ARE A NORTH CAROLINA PRODUCT. STANDING BESIDE THEM IS GORDON 
ZEALAND, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CARTERET COUNTY INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION. 

Industry From Abroad -Atlantic Veneer 




GANTRY CRANE HOISTING LOGS INTO VATS FOR TREATMENT 
IN THE ATLANTIC VENEER PLANT AT BEAUFORT. 



Construction of $2% million plant begun July 1, 
1964. Plant began operation Jan. 4, this year, al- 
though complete construction will not be realized for 
several weeks. 

Plant is one of 12 established by K. Heinz Moeh- 
ring Co., home office in Hamburg, Germany. The 
president and owner is his own trouble-shooter. Has 
been in on the establishment of each plan, directing 
construction and operation, at least until each unit 
is financially "on its feet." Total worth of Moehring 
Enterprises is approximately $25 millions. Seven 
other plants located in Germany, one in Paris, one 
in Ghana, one in Rangoon, one in Bangkok, one in 
Sao Paulo, one in Canada — then the Beaufort plant, 
which is the first in the United States. 

Beaufort plant processes walnut and hickory, pri- 
marily — although oak, elm, white gum and ash are 
also used. 

Plant houses first atomizer boiler ever used in 
the veneer business. Boiler was built in Wilmington, 
N. C. 

Plant has its own lumber stock, maintained at one 
million board feet. Has own saw mill, which cuts, 
at present, an average of 300 logs per day. 

Veneering process involves four steps: 1. cutting 
(saw mill), 2. treatment in vats (treatment involves 
steaming, boiling and cooking to soften and alter 
color of the wood — color, or shade, can be con- 
trolled), 3. slicing, 4. drying. 



16 




ANOTHER VIEW OF GIANT HICKORY LOG 
SHOWING COMPARATIVE SIZE. 



Plant now employs 60 persons — 95 per cent local. 
Will employ 200 by the end of 1965. Will employ 400 
(doubled) by the end of 1966, with the addition of a 
face veneer plant. Face veneer plant, which cuts 
veneer to order for furniture manufacturers and 
dealers, will go into operation by Feb. 1, this year, 
on a limited basis. 

Mr. Moehring expects value of plant to increase 
from %2 1 /z million now to $4 million when the plant 
reaches planned level of expansion at the end of 
1966. 




THIS IS PROCESSED VENEER 1-52 INCH THICK IN CUTS OK 
SIX TO TEN FT. IN LENGTH. 



F.M.C No 498 

The Hipoge Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

1211 McCall Street 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. 0. Box 93 

Atando Station 
Charlotte, N. C. 28286 



Norfolk-Newport News, Va. 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldg. 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn. 
of America, Inc. 



F.M.B. No. 2454 
APPLICATION NO. 70 

waters shipping co. 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 
CUSTOMS BROKER 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE & CO., INC. 

109 South Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agent, 
67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



17 




t G>ujvt>jui 



Hunting for the best way to ship freight 
to, from and within the South? You can 
now rest easy. You've found it. South- 
ern. Try us and see. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Our 

1865 -Hundredth- 1965 

Anniversary 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondelet Building 
JAckson 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SAratoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
WHitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 



W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice-President 



WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice-President 



J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 



LEMUEL L. DOSS. JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



Offices At 

State Port Terminal 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 3-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919-762-8187 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No 469 



AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



18 



GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 



MARINE INSURANCE 



Export Credit Insurance 



105 MUKCH1SON HUM. DING 



PHONE KO<?er 2-9691 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 




BARBER LINE 

Specialists 
in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports to 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, Inc. 



GENERAL AGENTS 



New York 
Cleveland 



Chicago 



17 Bart cry Place 
Tri-Cooit Shipping Co. 
Illuminating Bldg. 
Tri-C6ait Shipping Co. 
333 N. Michigan Ave. 



AGENT 
Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 







<M> K *M 




Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



19 



HEIDE AND CO., INC 

Custom House Brokers 

Freight Forwarders 

F. M. 8. No. 223 

F. M. C. No. 69 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 763-8271 
AND 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 726-5080 



W. S. R. BEANE 

President 1 

L. B. FINBERG 

Exec. Vice-Pres. 

MANAGER — MOREHEAD CITY — JACK TILLEY 



R. H. FUTCHS 
Traffic Mgr. 
E. MAYO HOLMES 
Sec. & Treas. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Processors 



Color Black & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 

Phone RO 36263 
119 Market Street 
JOHN L. BROWNING Wilmington, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



Walker Taylor Agency 



P. O. BOX 897 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. 0. DRAWER 31 


TELEPHONES 


726-6151 


726-6152 


CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 


William T. Davies 
Manager 


PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 


W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice President 


W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice President 


J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 


WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 


LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



20 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island- Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 
TRUCK 

BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING Building RALEIGH 



LT"P 




WITH 

CARTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 
Charles Piner & Teen Pincr PA 6-5440 

Operators 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 



Export expansion dates 



ade Center — institution* 
xhibirlc 



Jan. 13 ■ 20— FRANKFURT Trade Center— in; 
cotering equipment* 

Jan. 15 - Feb. 14— COLOMBO— Industri 
(U.S. national) 

Jan. 19 - 29— LONDON Trade Center— factory and office 
maintenance equipment * 

Jan. 23 - 31 — MILAN Trade Center — institutional catering 
equipment 

Jon. 24 - Feb. 14— CARACAS— international trade fair 
(U.S. national) 

Jan. 25 - Feb. 12— TOKYO Trade Center— U.S. Travel 
Service (local) 



Feb. 5 - 28— MONTEVIDEO— U.S. national exhibition (may 
possibly be in international industries fair) 



Feb. 20 - March 20— PHILIPPINES— industrial machinery 
trade development mission 

Feb. 20 - 27— MILAN Trade Center— high fidelity and 
stereo equipment 

Feb. 23 - March 5— LONDON Trade Center— U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture exhibition 

Feb. 27 - March 27 — INDIA — investment and industrial 
development trade mission 

March 7 - 28 — NAIROBI — U.S. national exhibition 

March 8 - 16— UTRECHT— Royal Netherlands Industries 
Fair — industrial and commercial gas equipment 

March 8 - 19 — TOKYO Trade Center — processed foods 
(USDA) 

March 10 - 17— FRANKFURT Trade Center— business ma- 
chines and equipment 

March 16 - 26 — STOCKHOLM Trade Center — packaging 
machinery 

March 20 - 25 — MILAN Trade Center — housewares 

March 20 - 29 — LYON — international trade fair (BIC) 

March 20 - April 20— THAILAND, REPUBLIC OF CHINA— 
trade and development mission 

March 20 - April 20— IRAQ, KUWAIT, LEBANON— trade 
expansion mission 

March 30 - April 9— LONDON Trade Center— small print- 
ing equipment 

April 7 - 14— FRANKFURT Trade Center— food processing, 
freezing and packaging equipment (tentative) 

April 14 - 25 — MILAN Trade Center — U.S. Department of 
Agriculture — U.S. foods and agriculture 

April 14 - 30— BANGKOK Trade Center— metal working 
equipment 



April 16 - May 6 — TOKYO— International Trade Fair- 
leisure goods and equipment 



April 21 - 30 — LONDON— International Engit 
hibition— factory modernization equipment 



pollution control 
ring Ex- 



ternational trade fair (BIC) 
international trade fair 



April 24 - May 9— LILLE— 

April 25 - May 4— HANOVER 
(BIC) 

April 30 - May 11 — BRUSSELS — international trade fair 
(BIC) 

ade Center — poultry equip- 



May 11 - 21— LONDON Trade Center— audio-visual 
equipment ond training aids (tentative) 

May 15 - 29— TOKYO Trade Center — air conditioning and 
refrigeration equipment (tentative) 

May 15 - June 12— COLOMBIA — building ond investment 
trade development mission 

apparel 

May 19 - June 2— BANGKOK Trade Center— air condi- 
tioning and refrigeration equipment (tentative) 



May 1965 — SEOUL— U.S. national exhibition 
une 1 - 1 5— BARCELONA— International Fair— hand 
powered tools, light machine tools and metal work ing 

une 9 - 16— FRANKFURT Trade Center— metal surface 
treatment and finishing equipment (tentative) 

une 11 - 21 — PARIS — International Air Show-aerospace 
industries (BIC) 

une 14 - 25— STOCKHOLM Trade Center— medical and 
surgical instruments 

une 15 - 25— LONDON Trade Center — industrial design 
services (tentative) 

une 16 - 30 — BANGKOK Trade Center — hotel, restaurant 
and apartment house equipment (tentative) 

une 19 - 26 — Electronic industrial process controls (ten- 
tative) 

une 1965 — TOKYO Trade Center — metal surface finishing 
equipment (tentative) 

une 1965 — POZNAN — U.S. national exhibition 

une 1965 — QUITO — U.S. national exhibition 

uly 3 - 11 — COLOGNE — International Meat Industry 
Supply Exhibition 
* Fully booked. 



You need to look into 

The North Carolina World Trade Association 



write or call -N. C. State Ports 
P. O. Box 149 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Telephone 919-829-3855 




MOREHEADCITY, N.C. 

P. 0. Box 507 

Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX: 919-255-2995 



NEW YORK 

26 Broadway, Room 767 

New York 4, New York 

Telephone BOwling Green 9-1843 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 

P. 0. Drawer 3037, Azalea Station 
Telephone ROger 3-1622 
TWX: 919-762-5661 



9toVtA CaJtotucco 

S 1TE PORTS 



qO°" 



fel 



^. | 



.. 



North Carolina State 
Raleigh 



Library 



a* 






-X. 



s& 




Oo^ 








FINNLINES COME TO N. C. 

An 8,000 ton symbol of Finland's growing stature in world trade arrived at Wilmington April 24, 1965 in the" form of the M/S "FINNFOREST" — 
the latest addition to the Finnlines fleet. 

The "FINNFOREST", which operates at 17 knots fully loaded, has a gross registered tonnage of 7,947 tons. Her five holds have a bale 
capacity of 485,914 cubic feet, including over 37,147 cubic feet of refrigerated space capable of carrying cargoes down to deep freeze 
temperature. In addition, she has three deep tanks for bulk petroleum products and vegetable oils. The ship provides luxurious facilities for 
six passengers and is equipped with a Finnish Sauna. 

The cargo-pajsenger vessel is operating between U. S. East and South Atlantic Coast ports and Northern Europe. 

Master of the "FINNFOREST" is Captain H. Berlin, a veteran of many years. 

The "FINNFOREST" arrival at Wilmington inaugurates a fortnightly service between Wilmington and Rotterdam, Hamburg, Helsinki, Katka 
and Abu. The lines will be represented in North Carolina by Waters Steamship Company of Wilmington. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Barber Lines _ 17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad _.. _ Inside Back Cover 

Colorcraft Studios 20 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. Inside Back Cover 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler 20 

N. C. World Trade Association Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 17 

Glasgow Hicks Co. 17 

Heide & Co., Inc. 20 

Hi-Page Co. 20 

Maersk. Line 20 



Morehead City Shipping Co. 
New Hanover County 



N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. 

North Carolina National Bank 
Southern Railway System 



Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 

Walker Taylor Insurance 

Waters Shipping Co. 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 



.Inside Back Cover 

16 

2 

1 

16 

15 

'. 2 

20 

16 



W. O. Smith & Co., Inc. .... 



.16 







If your Business is Local . . . National ... or International 



the Bank to 

With more than 65 offices in 12 of the state's 
major cities, North Carolina National is 
ideally set up to provide individuals and 
business firms with a full range of bank 
services throughout the Tarheel State... 

As a member of the Bank Wire System, 
North Carolina National Bank also main- 
tains direct contact with more than 200 
major banks in 63 of the nation's largest 
cities, to serve you instantly and conliden- 



seeisNCNB! 

tially in every state of the United States... 

And, thanks to the knowledge, experience 
and intimate worldwide connections of its 
International Department, North Carolina 
National Bank is uniquely qualified to serve 
your interests — swiftly and precisely — 
in any corner of the free world. 

For conscientious bank service around 
the corner or around the world, inquire at 
any North Carolina National Bank office. 



NCNB 



North CarolinaNational Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Offices in: Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Statesville, Tarboro, Wilmington, Winston>Sal»ro 



:vru 



J EI, 




~" ..A sis 



Tlt^R 



^C___j ^^ 




YOU 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING IUIIDING, RALEIGH 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



Walker Taylor Agency 



P. O. BOX 897 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

JOHN M. REEVES, Chairman, Pinehurst 
W. G. CLARK, JR., Vice Chairman, Tarboro 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
COOPER D. CASS, Winston-Salem 
LOUIS S. FICKLEN, Greenville 
JOSEPH FOJL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 




u 
STHTE PORTS 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSK1, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

ANDREW JACKSON, III, Director of Engineering 



SPRING ISSUE, 1965, SPA MAGAZINE 



vol. li. NO. l 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS address L. C. 
Bruce, Editor & Publisher — N. C. State Ports Magazine, 
P. O. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 






MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 507-Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal— Operations 

P. O. Box 3037-Telephone 

ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 






SOUTHPORT 

OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 457-2621 

P. O. Box 578 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 
Tel. 829-3855 

Box 149 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Directory Communications 



CONTENTS 



Down the Historyland Trial 



Tar Heels Afloat 



"The Immortal Showboat" 



Phosphate 



Export "E" Award 



Page 



10 



13 



Exportunities 1 1 




COVER STORY 

This is "Immortal Showboat," 
the USS North Carolina on the 
evening of April 1, 1965. 

Great enthusiasm was shown at 
the premiere, which drew a stellar 
audience including Governor and 
Mrs. Dan Moore, former governors 
Luther H. Hodges and Terry San- 
ford, Undersecretary of Commerce 
Franklin D. Roosevelt. Jr., and 
others. Members of the North 
Carolina General Assembly, hold- 
ing their biennial session in 
Raleigh, took time out from law- 
making to travel to Wilmington 
for a viewing of the spectacular 
production. (See Story Pag< 




These old cannons command 
the harbor of Colonial Edenton 







A GEM OF EARLY MILITARY ARCHI- 
TECTURE, FORT MACON PLAYED AN 
IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE CIVIL WAR 
AND IS TODAY RESTORED AS A STATE 
PARK. THE FORT STANDS AT THE 
ENTRANCE TO THE MOREHEAD CITY- 
BEAUFORT HARBOR. 




'■SOMERSET PLACE" IN PETTIGREW 
STATE PARK BETWEEN PLYMOUTH 
AND COLUMBIA, BUILT ABOUT 1830, IS 
A FINE EXAMPLE OF COASTAL PLAN- 
TATION HOUSES OF THIS PERIOD. 



Tryon Palace, completed in 1770 



m 


■^^^*rr 


v% '' 







DOWN THE HIS! 



Last spring we told you about the trail of History that 
winds through North Carolina, following the path of the early 
settlements beginning in the coastal Northeast near the fam- 
ous North Carolina Lost Colony and Jamestown, Virginia. 

We spoke to you of the Dismal Swamp Canal ; Albemarle 
County and the Roanoke Valley; the Neuse country and New 
Bern; Pamlico County and Beaufort; King Roger Moore 
country — New Hanover, Brunswick and the Cape Fear — 
then our trail turned inland, following the Cape Fear Valley 
to Fayetteville and beyond via the Old Plank Road to Salem 
and Wachovia. 

From there the trail leads into the Catawba Valley and 
over the gap at Swannanoa into Asheville, passing McDowell 
County and Old Fort. In this issue we journey into the land 
of the Cherokee and the Great Smokies. 

Sequoyiah, the Trail of Tears, and Qualla Boundary, all of 
these names so well known to the people of Far Western 
North Carolina, whose destiny by water once seemed tied to 
"Nolichucky Jack" Sevier's State of Franklin, now known as 
Tennessee. What many moderns do not realize as the History- 
land Trail leads across Swannanoa Gap it crosses the Eastern 



TENN 




SCALE -STATUTE: MILES 
IS 30 *S 60 75 



Ear 



ly/l6th, 17th, 18th) t 
V CENTURY y . 



trade routl 



In the East and West tho tenden 

Roanoke, Tar-Pnralico, Neuse, Can 
_J _J I 

83 82 81 

,1 



AD- 400.31 



3RYLAND TRAIL 






Continental Divide so the waters of the French Broad and 
Pigeon Rivers meander through the Smokies, and the Chero- 
kee lands into the Ohio Valley and the Mississippi. 

In colonial times and the early days of state development 
the trade routes of western North Carolina, except for the 
trail that we have traced for you here, followed the paths of 
the great river valleys — Catawba and Yadkin into South Car- 
olina and to Charleston or the French Broad and Pigeon into 
Tennessee and Memphis. Until the railroads and the highways 
came to Western North Carolina, its trade and community 
interests seemed all wrapped up with the neighbors, Tennessee 
and South Carolina. The coastal plain and ports at Beaufort 
and the Cape Fear seemed so far away. 

Now modern transportation is changing all that — but North 
Carolina has not yet caught up in highway construction with 
her neighbors. No direct route carries traffic from West to 
East in Tar Heelia compared the new Interstate Highway 
slicing South Carolina to the sea. In modern times our prin- 
cipal highways have followed the long circultuous trail we 
have described here. 




NORTH CAROLINA 



ato followthe river valleys 

ar, Catawba, Yadkin, Pigeon, French Broad 



US' 




FORT CASWELL, GUARDING THE 
MOUTH OF THE CAPE FEAR NEAR 
SOUTHPORT, IS NOW PART OF THE 
NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST ASSEMBLY 
GROUNDS. 




THE BIRTHPLACE OF NORTH CARO- 
LINA'S CIVIL WAR GOVERNOR. ZEBU- 
LON BAIRD VANCE MAINTAINED AS A 
STATE HISTORIC SITE. IT WAS BUILT 
ABOUT 1790 BY COL. DAVID VANCE. 
WHO FOUGHT AT KINGS MOUNTAIN. 
GOVERNOR VANCE WAS BORN HERE 
IN 1830. IT IS ABOUT 5 MILES FROM 
WEAVERVILLE NEAR ASHEVILLE AND 
THE BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY. 




Blue Ridge Mountains in 1773. The road 
is now called the Elk Creek Road, a part 
of the marked Daniel Boone Trail, paral- 
leling roughly U. S. 421. 

the story of the Cherokee Indians 

the eagle dance scene from "Unto These Hills 




MOREHEAD TERMINAL ]V 




REAR ADMIRAL GEORGE W. PRESSEY 
ASSUMED COMMAND OF AMPHIBIOUS 
GROUP TWO SEPTEMBER 24, 1964. 
REAR ADMIRAL PRESSEY WAS GRAD- 
UATED FROM HAMPTON HIGH 
SCHOOL, HAMPTON, VA.; SEVERN 
SCHOOL, SEVERN PARK, MD.; AND, 
IN JUNE 1932, FROM THE UNITED 
STATES NAVAL ACADEMY. HE AT- 
TENDED THE ARMED FORCES STAFF 
COLLEGE IN 1947 AND THE NA- 
TIONAL WAR COLLEGE IN 1953-54. 
DURING THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 
THE KOREAN WAR, HE SERVED AS 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF THE BAT- 
TLESHIP USS MISSOURI, AND SUB- 
SEQUENTLY COMMANDED THE OIL- 
ER USS HASSAYAMPA AND DESTROY- 
ER SQUADRON TWO IN THE ATLAN- 
TIC FLEET. HE WAS PROMOTED TO 
FLAG RANK IN 1961 AFTER SERVING 
AS CHIEF OF STAFF TO COMMANDER 
SEVENTH FLEET. 



COMMANDING OFFICER 
CAPTAIN MAXWELL "D" McDONALD, 
U. S. NAVY, IS A NATIVE OF ADA, 
OKLAHOMA. IN 1940, HE ENTERED 
THE NAVY, RECEIVING HIS COMMIS- 
SION AS AN ENSIGN, AND HIS DESIG- 
NATION AS A NAVAL AVIATOR IN 
1941. AFTER COMPLETION OF CIC 
SCHOOL IN ST. SIMONS ISLAND, 
GEORGIA AND FLIGHT TRAINING IN 
PENSACOLA, HE WAS ASSIGNED TO 
THE CLV USS MONTEREY AS A 
PILOT IN VF-30 UNTIL 1945. FROM 
1946 UNTIL 1947 HE SERVED ABOARD 
USS PRINCETON AS CIC OFFICER. 




NAME, USS OKINAWA— HISTORIC BATTLE OF WORLD WAR II; KEEL LAID, 1 APRIL 1960; LAUNCHED, 19 AUGUST 1961; COMMIS- 
SIONED, 14 APRIL 1962; LOAD DISPLACEMENT, 18,000 TONS; SHAFT HORSEPOWER, 22,000 SHAFT HORSEPOWER; LENGTH OVERALL, 
592 FEET; BEAM, 84 FEET; SHIP'S COMPANY, 50 OFFICERS (APPROXIMATELY), 500 ENLISTED (APPROXIMATELY) SPEED, IN EX- 
CESS OF 20 KNOTS; TROOP CAPACITY, 2,000; HELICOPTERCAPACITY, 24 LARGE (APPROXIMATELY); ARMAMENT, 4-TWIN 
3"/50 CALIBER RAPID-FIRE ANTI-AIRCRAFT MOUNTS. 




kKES NAVAL HISTORY 



The USS Okinawa a helicopter carrier 600 ft. 
long put into MHC in February to pick up the 
Amphib Marines of the 2nd Division. 

This little maneuver was large in the eyes of 
the N. C. State Port's people. 

It demonstrated many things. For instance, the 
Navy could save a great deal of time and money 
by embarking a field equipped Battalion directly 
down the "dock" without use of auxiliary craft. 

Since the job was done much quicker than 
hoped for it left a sweet taste. Also it showed 
N. C. Ports can handle the best and the largest. 

The keel of USS OKINAWA (LPH3) was laid 
on 1 April 1960, at the Philadelphia Naval Ship- 
yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

OKINAWA, an amphibious assault ship, is the 
first ship of the fleet to bear the name of that 
historic battle of World War II. She is the second 
ship of this class build from the keel up for the 
modern technique of vertical envelopment which 
exploits flexibility and surprise. 




ABOARD THE USS OKINAWA IN HER RUN FROM NORFOLK. 
VA., TO MOREHEAD CITY, N. C, TO OBSERVE THE FIRST 
PIERSIDE MOORING OF A CARRIER IN MOREHEAD CITY. 
WERE THESE CITY REPRESENTATIVES. MAJ. STANLEY OS- 
SERMAN, USMC. AIR OPERATIONS OFFICER OF THE HELI- 
COPTER CARRIER. EXPLAINS FLIGHT CONTROL EQUIPMENT 
TO (L TO R) CHIEF OF POLICE HUBERT FULCHER. COMMIS- 
SIONER TOM WADE, AND PORT DIRECTOR WALTER FRIEDE- 
RICHS. 
13 FEBRUARY 1965 — USN— 



LONGER THAN A 100,000 SQ. FT. WAREHOUSE OKINAWA 
TOWERS OVER WHARF AT MOREHEAD CITY LOOKING NORTH 
TOWARD MARSH ISLAND. 



OKINAWA AT MOREHEAD STATE PORT TERMINAL FOR FIRST 
VISIT OFCARRIER. NOTE SIZE COMPARED TO 90,000 SQ. FT. 
TRANSIT SHED. 




N. C. PORTS, PEOPLE and EVENTS 



TAR HEELS AFLOAT 



SOUTH ATLANTIC 




: 4^ V ffi £& hl 




On May 29th into Southport will come the 
flotilla of North Carolina — yacht owners, known 
as Tar Heels Afloat. They will be sailing on the 
regular Memorial Day cruise, but their destina- 
tion has a twofold purpose. They will join with 
Governor Dan Moore and the N. C. State Ports 
Authority and guests from all over North Caro- 
lina to dedicate the new facility of the Ports 
Authority. 




Cooperation Is Principal 
Theme of Talk by Hearn, 
Of FMC, to Ports Group 

In its fact-finding investigation 
No 5, pertaining to practices of the 
southern ports, the Federal Maritime 
Commission and its staff had re- 
ceived, from the port authorities in- 
volved in the inquiry, cooperation 
that was "most gratifying," said 
Commissioner George H. Hearn, of 
the FMC, in a talk at a luncheon 
in Washington, D.C., April 5. 



rcf ^■'^p** 




At lunc 
newly t 

Heorn 


lean of Se 
lected pre 

th Carolin 

center), of 
of the 


ulh Atlantic and Caribbean Por 
ident of the association, James 

Stote Ports Authority, introduce 
the Federal Moritime Commissio 
association and general manag 


I Association, April 5, in Washington, D.I j 
W. Davis (right, ot lectern), executive dire 
s the luncheon speaker, Commissioner Geo 
n. Sealed at left is Roy W. Gogc, vke-pr. 
er of the Jacksonville Port Authority. 






■ J 


■ ^ fij^^l 








lr'~ 




1' i 




KfMBi; J 




",L™ 


^*wZT%l~^ 


^i^c^iBm' 



Four of the 'notables' among the guests ot o luncheon April 5, in Washington, D.C., at wh 

are Commissioners Howard Freas (left) and Rupert L, Murphy, of the Interstate Commerce Comn 
standing are Representative W. J, Bryan Darn (left), of South Carolina, and Commissioner Jo 
Day, of the Federal Maritime Commission. 



/lS*&<-' /, 



What part does the trucking industry play in the econ- 
omy of North Carolina? 

PLENTY, according to J. C. Youngblood of Fletcher, 
President of the North Carolina Motor Carriers Associa- 
tion, Inc. 

Youngblood said the state's trucking industry employs 
294,417 persons and there are 376,884 trucks. 

North Carolina motor carriers paid the state of North 
Carolina $61,966,486 last year in license and fuel taxes 
and they also kicked in $35,350,673 to Uncle Sam — making 
a total of over $97 million in one years' truck taxes by 
Tarheel carriers. 

And the Tarheel trucking wages and salaries accounted 
for more than $25 out of each $100 in retail sales, which 
amounted to $1,194,367,278 out of $4,726,300,000 total in 
one year. 

Youngblood pointed out that the vast trucking industry 
can meet any emergency as well as the daily routine 
business of the area. "We all have marveled at the co- 
ordination of men and vehicles in the daily operation of 
trucks. 

"Because trucks operate around the clock and are com- 
ing in and out of North Carolina every hour of the day 
and night, one cannot visualize the millions of items and 
products on the floorboards of the workhorse truck," 
Youngblood declared. 

"New super-highways are good business and profit- 
making too — as just one stretch of 33.3 Tarheel highway 
miles on Interstate 85 is returning an annual profit of 
$1,663,469 to North Carolina," Youngblood said. 



yut^^^A^M ' ' rfjvu£ /# /f£S" 



SOUTHPORT 
FACILITY MANAGER 




H. A. SCHMIDT HAS BEEN 
APPOINTED MANAGER OF 
THE SOUTHPORT SMALL 
BOAT HARBOR, A FACILITY 
OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE PORTS AUTHORITY. 
MR. SCHMIDT (PICTURED 
HERE) RESIDES IN SOUTH- 
PORT WITH HIS FAMILY 
AND IS NOW VERY MUCH 
OCCUPIED WITH THE 

FIRST CUSTOMERS FOR HIS 
FACILITY. CONSTRUCTION 
WAS STARTED ON THE 
FACILITY IN 1964 AS* A RE- 
SULT OF A BOND ISSUE, 
VOTED ON BY THE PEOPLE 
OF NORTH CAROLINA IN 
THE ELECTION OF 1959. 



8 



« 



THE IMMORTAL SHOWBOAT 



99 




Coastal visitors this season have an exciting- experi- 
ence at the USS North Carolina, the mighty World 
War II battleship berthed at Wilmington as a memo- 
rial to Tar Heels who served their country in wartime. 

The gallant vessel is both star and setting for "The 
Immortal Showboat," a Sound and Light production which tells the stirring 
story of her fighting career. Dialogue, music, and spectacular lighting effects 
are combined to transport the audience, seated in stands near the bow of the 
battleship, backwards in time 25 years to the South Pacific conflict in which 
the 35,000-ton battlewagon played so prominent a part. 

New to this country, the Sound and Light technique has proven eminently 
successful in dramatizing historic sites in Europe and Africa. The USS North 
Carolina Battleship Commission spent $300,000 to put together "The Immortal 
Showboat," calling on the best technical and creative talents to assure a pro- 
duction which is both exciting entertainment and historically accurate. Per- 
formances are given nightly at 8 p.m. through Labor Day. 



SEEN IN PORT ON ANY GIVEN DAY 



JOT 'J\m Jlk A 




Industrial waterside plant locations and 
expansions in the first quarter of 1965 
reached a greater growth rate than for 
any period since the third quarter of 1963, 
The American Waterways Operators, Inc., 
reported today. 



NORWEGIAN 



Production industries con- 
structed, expanded, or an- 
nounced plans to construct or 
expand 125 plant facilities 
along or adjacent to navigable 
waterways during the first 
quarter of this year. This com- 
pares with 79 such facilities 
built or announced in the fourth 
quarter of 1964. The largest 
previous quarterly construc- 
tion figure came in the third 
quarter of 1963 when 145 plant 
facilities were built or an- 
nounced. 

The chemical industry in the 
first quarter of 1965 continued 

to lead all other industries in building and expanding production facilities 
along or adjacent to inland waterways. The survey shows that chemical 
companies added or expanded 39 facilities on water-oriented site, repre- 
senting 31 percent of all new waterside plant facilities reported in the 
Association's survey for the period. 





t 



YUGOSLAV 



GREEK 




AMERICAN 



PROGRESS WITH CONSERVATION 




PHOSPHATE DREDGE PREPARES FOR DRY OPEN PIT MINE 
AT LEE CREEK, NORTH CAROLINA TO BE OPERATED BY 
TEXAS GULF SULPHUR. 



HERE IS HOW LAND RECLAMATION WORKS 
IN FLORIDA PHOSPHATE FIELD 

One Phosphate Company has been carrying out 
a program of land use and reclamation on their 
holdings since 1936. Their principal activity in 
regard to reserve land use has been in the field of 
forestry. The Company has planted some 10 mil- 
lion pine seedlings on 16,000 acres of barren land. 
By good forest management and fire control, they 
have naturally re-forested additional thousands 
of acres. These forests now sustain a large annual 
harvest of pulpwood, logs, poles and other forest 
products. Of course, this requires additional la- 
bor, trucks, etc., as well as providing more freight 
revenue and other economic benefits to the com- 
munity that idle lands would not. All these forest 
lands are also leased to local cattlemen who are 
allowed to improve pastures within the forests. 

In recent years, the mining companies have 
greatly expanded the reclamation of mined out 
lands. The goal is to return to a useable condi- 
tion every acre that is possible and practical. The 
Florida Companies five year projection estimate 
they will return to use 86% as much land as they 
will mine. 

Reclaimed land and adjoining water areas are 
a natural for outdoor recreation. This program 
has been developed by all the companies. Several 



WHAT PHOSPHATE MINING 

WILL AND CAN DO IN NORTH CAROLINA 



U 



WORLD PHOSPHATE ROCK TRENDS • PRODUCTION 

(millions of long tons) 



COMMUNIST BLOC 
FREE WORLD 




OTHER 
COMMUNIST BLOC 



SOVIET UNION 



OTHER FREE WORLD 

OCEANIA 

TUNISIA 



UNITED STATES 



1954 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59 '60 '61 '62 '63 '64 



WORLD PHOSPHATE ROCK TRENDS • CONSUMPTION 

(millions of long tons) 



COMMUNIST BLOC 
I FREE WORLD 




COMMUNIST BLOC 



OTHER FREE WORLD 



WESTERN EUROPE 



UNITED STATES 



1954 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59 '60 '61 '62 '63 '64 






10 



EE AND 
NJOY 



Nation's No. 1 



Outdoor Drama 



SEE AND 
ENJOY 



Nation'* No. 1 



Outdoor Drama 



I 



.— ,. i-- 



25th SEASON — June 25 thru September 5, 1965 

Monday thru Saturday, 8:15 p.m. (EST) 
Special Sunday Performances: July 4 & Sept. 5 
Waterside Theatre, Roanoke Island 
Manteo, North Carolina 



25th SEASON — June 25 thru September 5, 1965 

Monday thru Saturday, 8:15 p.m. (EST) 
Special Sunday Performances: July 4 & Sept. 5 
Waterside Theatre, Roanoke Island 
Manteo, North Carolina 



HOW FLORIDA DOES IT 



(OV);r) 



POOL — SHORELINE 
IMPROVED AND RAMP 
INSTALLED POR BET- 
TER ACCESS. 




.»,9~ 



tmwm 



Joe Layton's dazzling new 

production 
of PAUL GREEN'S 



& :■*■»■> 

™ *«5 



-•* fe '*#' 



i***'% s 



For its 25th season, The Lost Colony continues the 
widely-acclaimed 1964 production of Joe Layton, dynamic 
young Broadway and TV Director and Choreographer — 
with even more improvements in costuming, lighting, 
scenic design and staging. 

Nation's oldest and longest-running outdoor drama 
. . . every summer since 1937 (except four World War II 
years) in magnificent 2,000-seat Waterside Theatre on 
shores of Roanoke Sound in Fort Raleigh National His- 
toric Site, spiritual birthplace of America. 

Authored by Pulitzer Prize-winner Paul Green and 
produced by Roanoke Island Historical Association, in 
cooperation with the State of North Carolina and the 
National Park Service. 

Presented by a company of 150 professional actors, 
dancers, singers and technicians ... in two acts and 11 
scenes . . . the play surrounds you . . . drama so big it 
must be presented under the stars. 



History You Can See and Feel 

Story of the first English settlement in America, on the 
very spot where Sir Walter Raleigh's 1587 colony landed 
lived and finally vanished into the great unknown . . ! 
more than 20 years before Jamestown and 30 years before 
Plymouth Rock . . . featuring the birth of Virginia Dare 
first child of English parents born in the 16th century 
New World. 

Pageantry of Queen Elizabeth's court . . . sorrow anc 
heartbreak of starvation and death on a lonely shore . . 
excitement of Indian dances and attacks . . . the suspense 
and romance lightened by rollicking humor and gay songs 

Family entertainment . . . school age children thril! 
to seeing history unfold before their eyes . . . adults nevei I 
cease to speculate on what happened to these courageous 
people ... all ages love antics of Old Tom and his faith 
ful squaw, Agona. 




1954 '55 '56 '57 '58 59 '60 '61 '62 '63 '64 



1954 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59 '60 '61 '62 '63 '64 






10 



" 



A "New" Fort Raleigh This Year 

The Fort Raleigh National Historic Site, where the first 
Anglo-American settlement was attempted, is being en- 
larged and improved as a part of the National Park Serv- 
ice's Mission 66 Project. A new Visitor Center — including 
a Lost Colony gift and souvenir shop — will be, when 
completed, a "must" for full enjoyment of the drama. 

A new FREE 600-car paved parking lot is only 400 
feet (one-fourth the former distance) from the gate where 
you enter the Waterside Theatre. 

Also Be Sure to See and Enjoy 

Wright Brothers Memorial (first flight site), the beauti- 
ful Elizabethan Garden (next door to Waterside Theatre), 
and the Cape Hatteras National Seashore (with free 
museums at the Bodie Island and the world-famous Cape 
Hatteras lighthouses). 



Easy to Reach 

Roanoke Island, Manteo, the Waterside Theatre and 
The Lost Colony may now be reached over good TOLL- 
FREE highways and bridges (no more ferries). Only 75 
minutes from U.S. 17 (Ocean Hiway), one hour and 45 
minutes from Norfolk, Va. and the Hampton Roads area, 
and less than four hours from Raleigh or from Interstate 
95 and U.S. 301. A new $4 million bridge now connects 
Nags Head, Kill Devil Hills and Kitty Hawk with fabulous 
Hatteras Island. Free Fishing from this bridge over fa- 
mous Oregon Inlet. 

Tourist Accommodations 

The finest hotels, motels, cottages, restaurants and other 
tourist accommodations are available in Manteo and on 
the Dare Beaches (only minutes from the Waterside 
Theatre). For information write the Dare County Tourist 
Bureau, Manteo, N. C. and/or the Nags Head Chamber of 
Commerce, Nags Head, N. C. 




• •* - v~ ■ ~^^^ ^P^L. IHW - ■ • 






POOL — SHORELINE 


HOW FLORIDA 


DOES IT 

(OV];r) 


IMPROVED AND RAMP 
INSTALLED FOR BET- 
TER ACCESS. 






THE LOST COLONY — for vacation, 
holiday or week-end enjoyment 





















JUNE 


AUGUST 




S 


M 


T W T 


F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


■ 


28 


29 30 


25 


26 


12 3 4 6 6 7 
8 8 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 13 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


JULY 


S 


M 


T W T 


r 


S 


SEPTEMBER 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 

19 

26 


1 
6 7 8 
13 14 15 
20 21 22 
27 28 29 


2 

9 
16 

23 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 



















Sunday Performances July 4 & Sept. 5 Only 
SEATING ARRANGEMENT & TICKETS 



""'oO 




All reserved seats (regardless of age) $3.00 

General admission (12 years and over) $2.00 

General admission (6 to 12 years) $1.00 

Children under 6 years admitted free 
Special rates quoted upon request for 
organized groups of 10 or more persons 



Advance Reservations Recommended 

Buy tickets in advance to insure best seats and avoid 
standing in line at box office. Reserved seats on sale at 
most motels and hotels, and elsewhere in area. Phone 
473-2658 in Manteo for reservations or mail Ticket Order 
Form to THE LOST COLONY, Box 68, Manteo, N. C. 



North Carolina's COASTAL HISTORYLAND 

begins on Roanoke Island with 

THE LOST COLONY 



^fc RICHMOND 
I' 




TICKET ORDER FORM 



Name- 



Address. 
City 



State- 



( Number) 



Day 



tickets to The Lost Colony for the 
_ performance. 



Date 



Enclosed is check (or money order) for $ 

Allow ample time for mailing of tickets. If it is too late 
to mail tickets to you we will hold them at the Theatre 
Box Office. Refunds cannot be made unless tickets are re- 
turned and reservations cancelled prior to performance date. 
General Admission tickets may be purchased at the Theatre 
Box Office only. 




I 
I 
I 



?■■■■■ 



UNITED STATES 






10 



KEEPING THE LAND -BEAUTIFUL 



thousand acres of mined out lands have been 
leased or given to public agencies. Fish manage- 
ment, parks, boating and swimming areas have 
been set up and are heavily used. 

All companies cooperate with local Scouts, 
Audubon groups, sportsmen clubs, etc., in provid- 
ing land for camping or other conservation ac- 
tivities. 

Good agricultural use of reclaimed lands is 
growing. Citrus groves have proven to be a good 
land use as well as all types of pasture, truck 
crops and forest trees. 

It must be understood Phosphate Companies 
have problems in mining. Areas for waste dis- 
posal must be provided. It is not possible to re- 
claim every acre as quickly as they would like. 

Companies plan reclamation before mining ac- 
tually begins. As mining progresses, reclamation 
also is started wherever possible. Spoil is stacked 
where leveling or grading to a useable condition 
is possible with dozers or other heavy equipment. 
To produce "reborn acres" requires careful plan- 
ning and supervision. The Companies are con- 
stantly planning reclamation future programs. 

Many acres of reclaimed land have already 
been put to the highest use possible — housing. 
These lots are largely lakefront lots and are in 
great demand. This use of reclaimed land will in- 
crease as population grows and land value be- 
comes higher. 



NORTH CAROLINA PHOSPHATE COMPANY 
LAND UTILIZATION PROGRAM 

In all of the publicity regarding the mining and 
prospecting activities of the various companies 
planning to produce phosphate in eastern North 
Carolina, little attention has been given to the 
vital contribution that these same companies will 
make to the long-range land utilization program 
of the area. 

For almost two years now, the North Carolina 
Phosphate Company has maintained a full-time 
agronomist on its staff to advise the farmers 
leasing its property on the latest techniques of 
soil fertility, crop rotation and the many other 
aspects of scientific farming. 



HOW FLORIDA DOES IT 



POOL — SHORELINE 
IMPROVED AND RAMP 
INSTALLED FOR BET- 
TER ACCESS. 




VAST SCOPE OF LEE CREEK MINE DEVELOPMENT, INCLUD- 
ING AN AIRSTRIP CREATED BY LAND FILL FROM DREDGING. 
A DIVERSION CANAL, AND LAND CLEARING FOR PROCESSING 
AND TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES. (TGS photo) 



North Carolina Phosphate's agricultural repre- 
sentative in the area is Mr. N. W. (Bill) Worsley. 
Bill, a 1957 graduate of North Carolina State in 
agronomy, is a native of Oak City, North Caro- 
lina. He was employed by the federal agricultural 
extension service prior to his appointment with 
North Carolina Phosphate. 



(OVER) 




TAR HEELS STUDY FLORIDA MINING 




■ I 







SLIME PONDS CAN BE USED AFTER THEY SETTLE AND 
DRAIN FOR SEVERAL YEARS. 

CLEARING SLIME POND. CLEARED SLIME POND THAT WILL 
BE PLANTED TO CLOVER. 

He is currently advising 25 farm operators on 
6000 acres of farm land. Major crops in the area 
are corn, tobacco and soy beans. 

In the geological exploration program, test 
holes are sunk deep into the ground. These test 
holes can be used to provide irrigation water to 
the farmers in the area, and to date, seven holes 
are being used for this purpose. 

Land unsuited — or unneeded — for other crops 
is used for tree farming. At the present time, 
North Carolina Phosphate maintains 10,000 acres 



of timber land for the production of lumber and 
pulp wood. Again, the latest scientific methods 
are employed in the development of these areas. 



The Texas Gulf Sulphur Co. largest of N. C. 
firms beginning operations (See Photos Pages 8 
& 9) have announced elaborate plans for land 
reclamation. They also have announced a pro- 
spective $40,000,000 investment in related in- 
dustry in the area. 



CITRUS GROVE ON MINED OUT LAND. SPOIL IN BACK- 
GROUND WILL BE GRADED AND MORE GROVES PLANTED. 




Phosphate Education Tour 



April 2, 1965 These facts come to light: 



Phosphate Rock Production, 1964 15.58 million 

PHOSPHATE ROCK PRODUCTION, 1964 

EMPLOYEES, 1965, in Polk and Hillsborough 

SALARY AND WAGES : 

MONIES PAID TO THE FOLLOWING 

not yet available) : 

Electric 11,787,000.00 

21,465,000.00 
NEW CONSTRUCTION: 
AD VALOREM TAXES, 1964 

Polk County 

20 7( of the total tax. 
EQUIPMENT, to January 1, 1965: 

Water 

Total 
CONTROL 
EQUIPMENT NOW ON order or being installed 

The Florida Phosphate Council figures show 
by 63'^ despite a 43% increase in the amount of 
MONIES SPENT IN ESTIMATED SALES 
Phosphate Council : $1,174,000.00 

1964 1961 thru 1964 

2,779 2,092 9,888 9,888 

1965 thru 1979 Acres Donated 

15,255 13,540 108 1,850 

1964 1961 through 1964 1965 through 1979 



3,545,094.00 



14,102,358.00 

33,009,885.00 

5,127,200.00 



long tons Value. In excess of $1000,000,000.00 

15.58 million long tons 

Counties 6,676 

In excess of $40,000,000.00 

COMPANIES IN 1963 (1964 figures are 

Railroad 35,825,000.00 

Industrial and Electrical Suppliers 
Local Trucking 1,483,000.00 

Estimated in excess of 140,000,000.00 
Hillsborough County 246,709.00 

For your information, this is more than 
MONIES SPENT FOR AIR POLLUTION 

Air 18,907,527.00 



ESTIMATED ANNUAL COST OF POLLUTION 
VALUE OF ADDITIONAL WASTE CONTROL 
but not in operation : 3,765,500.00 

that the companies have reduced fluorine emitted 
phosphate rock in process. 
TAXES IN 1964 by members of the Florida 
LAND MINED AND RECLAIMED . 
Mined Reclaimed Mined Reclaimed 

Projected 
Mined Reclaimed 1964 1965 thru 1969 

Percent Reclaimed 
75% 76 % 89% 



The above figures were compiled by the Florida Phosphate Council. 
12 



N.C. EXPORT NEWS REEC '64 



Developed program to assist in the export of 
peaches and apples from North Carolina 

Sponsoring organization of the first North Caro- 
lina World Trade Association 

Sponsored State-wide Workshop on expanding 
North Carolina's agricultural exports 

Council members personally contacted 240 North 
Carolina firms to promote export sales 

Promoted creation of International Trade Com- 
mittees in Chambers of Commerce 

Developed a statistical report on increased export 
of agricultural products 



Organized a Toastmasters speakers project for 
talks on export expansion 

Promoted publication of "Export Sales Oppor- 
tunities" each week in ten daily newspapers 

Co-sponsored State-wide World Trade Confer- 
ences 

Distributed radio scripts on export expansion to 
150 North Carolina radio stations 

Sponsored 25 Export Clinics throughout the State 

Result of these efforts: 46 North Carolina firms 
made initial export sales in 1964. 



The Regional Export Expansion Council of North Carolina produced the amazing record noted 
above during the last calendar year and was cited by the Department of Commerce as one 
of the best in the land. 



N. CAROLINA FIRM WINS PRES. "E" AWARD 



Joel New, Regional manager of U. S. Dept. of 
Commerce, in N. C, announced that Blue Bell, 
Inc., 335 Church Street, Greensboro, North Caro- 
lina, manufacturer of sportswear, work clothes, 
and western style jeans, has been named by Sec- 
retary of Commerce John T. Connor to receive 
the President's "E" Award for excellence in ex- 
panding export markets, the Department of Com- 
merce announced today in Washington, D. C. 

The Greensboro Company, headed by E. A. 
Morris, more than doubled its export sales of 




L. TO R. : JOEL B. NEW. FIELD OFFICER. U. S. DEPARTMENT 
OF COMMERCE, GREENSRORO, N. C ; E. A. MORRIS. PRESIDENT. 
MLUE HELL. INC.. GREENSBORO. N. C. : ROY I,. MORGAN. DI- 
RECTOR OF FIELD SERVICES V. S. DEPARTMENT (IE COM- 
MERCE, WASHINGTON. D. C: H. HANKS NEWMAN. CHAIRMAN. 
REGIONAL EXPORT EXPANSION COUNCIL. WINSTON-SALEM. 
N. C. : W. O. CONRAD, CHAIRMAN, INDUSTRIAL DIVISION, 
GREENSBORO ('HAMMER OF COMMERCE. GREENSMORO, N. C 



1961-62 in 1963-64. Exports are handled through 
a special export department with sales subsidi- 
aries in Canada, Great Britain, Belgium and Ger- 
many and selling -agents in principal countries 
throughout the world. 

The "E" Award presentation was made at 
Sedgefield Inn. The Award includes a Blue and 
Gold Citation signed in the name of President 
Lyndon B. Johnson by Secretary Connor, an "E" 
Flag and "E" Lapel Buttons. It was made by 
Roy L. Morgan, Director of Field Services, U. S. 
Dept. of Commerce. 

The "E" Award for excellence in exporting is 
an adaptation of the World War II "E" awarded 
industrial plants for outstanding war production. 
It was revived in December 1961 as part of the 
National Export Expansion Drive. 

According to a special survey conducted by the 
Bureau of the Census, widespread increases in 
U. S. manufactured exports were made by vari- 
ous States between 1960 and 1963. The State of 
North Carolina increased its exports of manu- 
factured goods by 10 percent during this three- 
year period. 

Spurred by the Government's export promotion 
efforts, undertaken with the co-operation of the 
business community, total U. S. exports rose to 
$25.6 billion in 1964, an increase of 30 percent 
over 1960. 

"Continued efforts to expand foreign trade, 
such as those of the Blue Bell Company, will fur- 
ther strengthen our domestic economy, increase 
jobs and improve world trade position of the 
United States," Mr. New said. 



13 



EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 
U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
E. B. Peabody, Sr. 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



For Increased Sales and Profits 

Field Crops 

Germany — Bread grains, feed grains, oilseeds. See- 
kamp & Tewes, 56 Soegestrasse (P. 0. Box 618) 28 
Bremen. 

Livestock 

Malaysia — Day-old chicks. Requests replies from 
supplies, quotations cif Singapore. Prices must be 
competitive. Mr. Ho Seng Choon, Lian Wah Hang, 
109/111-A Market St., Singapore 1. 

Commercial Farm Products 

Hong Kong — Grass coverings, in the form of fer- 
tilized dirt or mulch, mixed with grass seeds which 
sprout when watered, for use in covering many types 
of bare areas, e.g., golf courses or grassless hill land. 
Alexandra, James & Co., Ltd., Rooms 512/513, No. 9, 
Ice House St., G.P.O. Box 735, Hong Kong. 

Food, Related Products 

British Guiana — Foodstuffs, all types, including 
canned products, onions, garlic, pickled beef and pork. 
Kwong Wah Loong Co., 15/16 Holmes and Queen 
Sts., Georgetown. 

Meat Products 

British Guiana — Pickled meat. Commission mer- 
chant and agent requests replies from producers of 
barreled pickled meat. Kwong Wah Loong Co., 15/16 
Holmes and Queen Sts., Georgetown. 

Dairy Products 

Pakistan — Non-fat dry milk, $100,000 under PL 
480. Javaid Corporation, 49/D Shahalam Market, La- 
hore, West Pakistan. 

Canning, Preserving Foods 

France — Canned food products, medium-priced, 
good quality, including canned fish and crab meat, 
vegetables, fruits, in standard-size tin cans. Agency 
and exclusive distributorship desired for Senegal, 
Gambia, Mali. Potential direct importers. Requests 
quotations from producers and exporters only. Etab- 
lissements Maurel & Prom, 18 rue Porte-Dijeaux, 
Bordeaux, Gironde. 

Grain Mill Products 

Senegal — Yellow corn, barley, millet, white sor- 
ghum, 200-300 tons per month of feed grains. Re- 
quests price quotations cif Dakar, correspondence in 
French preferable. Ets Nadra FILFILI and Fils, 22, 
rue Robert Brim, Dakar. 

Food Preparations 

Germany — Soybean meal and oil cakes. Seekamp & 
Tewes, 56 Soegestrasse (P. O. Box 618), 28 Bremen. 



Textile Mill Products 

South Africa — Fabrics for automobile seat covers, 
made of rayon, nylon, raffia, mixed fibres. Direct pur- 
chase and agency. Requests samples, price lists from 
manufacturers or their sole export houses only. Her- 
cules Equipment (Pty.) Ltd., 14-16 Victoria Rd. Near 
Tollgate, Cape Town. 

Sweden — High-medium priced fabrics for bed- 
spreads ; finished bedspreads. Moln-Baddar, Skattkarr. 

Men's, Youth's, Boys', Furnishings 

Germany — Shirts, cotton poplin, drip-dry. Direct 
purchase and agency. Unitas Handelsgenesellschaft Lei- 
pert & Co., 6 Bahnhofstrasse, 28 Bremen. 

Women's, Misses', Children's Under Garments 

Venezuela — Infants' under garments, all types. For 
distribution throughout Venezuela. Cadenas Inter- 
nacionales, C.A., Apartado 12405, Caracas. 

Soaps, Detergents, Cleaning Preparations 

British Guiayia — Tallow vegetable oil for use in 
manufacturing laundry soap. Swan Manufacturing 
Co., Ltd., 28 Evans St., New Charlestown, George- 
town. 

Chemical Products 

Hong Kong — Chemicals for rubber, paint industries 
and dyeing works. Bodak Corp., Ltd., 14th floor, Hang 
Chong Bldg., 5 Queen's Rd. Central, Hong Kong. 

Farm Machinery 

Greece — Cotton pickers. Importer-sales agent re- 
quests replies with cif Piraeus price quotations. Direct 
purchase and/or agency. Hermes Trade & Import 
Bureau — A. Anastassiadi & Co., 47 Vas. Sofias St., 
Athens 140. 

Malaysia — Farm and poultry equipment. Requests 
replies from manufacturers/supplies, quotations cif 
Singapore. Prices must be competitive. Ho Seng 
Choon, Lian Wah Hang, 109/111-A Market St., Singa- 
pore 1. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Neiv Zealand — Equipment for timber cutting, saw- 
milling, early stage processing of lumber. W. W. Wil- 
liams, Director, L. J. Fisher & Co. Ltd., Jellicoe Rd., 
Panmure, Auckland, E.2, New Zealand. 

Industrial Heating Equipment 

Venezuela — Pumps for water and industrial liquids, 
vertical turbine pumps and electric controls. Direct 
purchase and agency for Venezuela. Aguador C.A., 
Apartado 4259 Este, Caracas. 

Toys, Amusement, Sporting, Athletic Goods 

Finland — Toys, models, hobby and craft items, 
games; preferbly well-known trademarked articles. 
Requests descriptive literature, price lists, terms. 
F:ma NY-PA T:mi Wikstrom & Co., Johanneksentie 
8 C 46, Helsinki, Finland. 




(5uten i:ag 
means hello in 

©usseldorf. . . 
^achotta means business; 

If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in 
Dusseldorf . . . see Wachovia. A Wachovia Interna- 
tional Specialist can help you do business better in 
West Germany ... or anywhere in the free world. 
His fingers are on the economic pulse of six conti- 
nents. He can smooth the way . . . right away . . .for 
buying and selling in every major world market. 
Wachovia was the first bank in the Southeast to win 
the U.S. Government's coveted new E-for-Export 



Award. Look to Wachovia International for all this 
. . . and more: trade leads/ credit reports/ untangling 
exchange regulations/ acceptance financing' letters of 
credit/ collection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 




Southern doesn't stopwhen the sun goes 
down. We go 24 hours a day, 365 days 
a year. That means when you ship via 
Southern your freight keeps moving. It's 
a wise thing to remember, 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Our 

1865 -Hundredth - 7 965 

Anniversary 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 

PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondelet Building 
jAekson 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 
SAratoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 

109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
WHiteholl 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



PETER B. BOFFIN 
President 



W. D. WILLIAMS 
Vice-President 



WADE H. PIERCE 
Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 
Exec. Vice-President 



J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 



LEMUEL L. DOSS. JR. 
Trr.ffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



Offices At 

State Port Terminal 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone RO 3-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TVVX NO. 919-762-8187 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No 469 



AT ITS BEST i 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year Wound mQd climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Cifissi oners — Couission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



16 



GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 



MARINE IINSURANCE 

Export Credit Insurance 



105 MURCHISON HUH. DING 



PHONE ROKer 2-Ufi'Jl 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 




BARBER LINE 

Specialists 
in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports to 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, Inc. 



GENERAL AGENTS 



New York 

Cleveland 



Chicago 



17 Battery Place 
Tri-Cooit Shipping Co. 
Illuminating Blag. 
Tri-C6ast Shipping Co. 
333 N. Michigan Ave. 



AGENT 
Morchead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 




Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



17 



r^ 





W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses of 396,000 
square feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL: Customs Appraisal Service pro- 
vided in modern appraiser warehouse at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water, and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds with 266,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Ten acres paved open storage, acces- 
sible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
truck and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 

EXCITING AERIAL PHOTO OF WILMINGTON STATE PORT 
TERMINAL & SURROUNDING AREA. TWO NEW 100,000 SQ. FT. 
WAREHOUSES HAVE BEEN ADDED SINCE 1960 (L). (2) 
INSIDE CIRCLE IS 87.6 ACRE LAND ACQUISITION OF 196£ 
SHADED AREA INDICATES NEW DOCK EXTENSION NOW 
A BUILDING CONTAINING TWO NEW SHIP BERTHS. 





WALTER FRIEDERICHS (INSET) IS T 
NEW OPERATIONS MANAGER AT T 
STATE PORT TERMINAL AT WILMINGTO 
HE SUCCEEDS AL C. SMITH, WHO HAS 
MOVED TO MOREHEAD CITY, REPLACING 
BILL DA VIES AS MANAGER OF THE MORE- 
HEAD CITY SHIPPING COMPANY. MR. 
FRIEDERICHS HAS SERVED FOR THE PAST 
EIGHT YEARS AS OPERATIONS MANAGER 
AT THE MOREHEAD CITY TERMINAL, DUR- 
ING WHICH TIME THE TERMINAL HAS 
EVIDENCED REMARKABLE GROWTH. HE IS 
MARRIED AND HAS THREE CHILDREN, 
AND HAS BEEN ACTIVE IN CIVIC AFFAIRS 
IN MOREHEAD CITY, SERVING ON THE 
NEUSE DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE AND 
THE EMERGENCY WATER TRANSPORTA- 
TION COMMITTEE. MR. FRIEDERICHS TAKES 
OVER THE OPERATIONS AT WILMINGTON 
AT A TIME WHEN A NEW THREE AND 
ONE-HALF MILLION DOLLAR EXPANSION 
PROGRAM IS NEARING COMPLETION. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,505 feet long with a 46-foot apron. Capacity — five 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnet 
work and 2-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomo- 
tive crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses ; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY : Security force on duty at all times. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL, WILMINGTON 1954 COMPARE WF 
10 YEARS LATER (ABOVE LEFT). 







CHARLES McNEILL (INSET) HAS BEEN 
ELEVATED TO THE POSITION OF OPERA- 
TIONS MANAGER OF THE PORT TERMINAL 
AT MOREHEAD CITY. MR. McNEILL HAS 
BEEN WITH THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
PORTS MANY YEARS AND HAS SERVED IN 
THE CAPACITY OF ASSISTANT MANAGER 
FOR THE LAST EIGHT YEARS. HE IS WELL 
QUALIFIED FOR THE POSITION; IS MAR- 
RIED; HAS THREE CHILDREN; IS A MEM- 
BER OF THE ROTARY CLUB, AND IMME- 
DIATE PAST PRESIDENT OF THE MORE- 
HEAD CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. 
McNEILL TAKES OVER AT MHC ON THE 
EVE OF THE NEW BULK HANDLING FACIL- 
ITY EXPANSION WHICH WILL TRIPLE THE 
CAPACITY OF THE TERMINAL. 




MOREHEAD CI 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth of 35 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 100,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
and one of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses, totaling 
456,000 square feet, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
— Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on ter- 
minal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. South- 
ern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to Port 
property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization 
cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses ; 
also easy level access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cy- 
anide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 
chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern— A&EC Railway 
System and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



MOREHEAD CITY PORT TERMINAL IN 1948 BEFORE MODERN 
DEVELOPMENT BEGAN IN 1949— NOTICE DIFFERENCE (ABOVE) 
IN 1965—12 YEARS OF PROGRESS. 



AERIAL MAP OF BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD CITY HARBOR- 
SHOWING REMARKABLE PORT DEVELOPMENT. 




/ 










Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Processors 



Color Black & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



JOHN L. BROWNING 



Phone RO 36263 
119 Market Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



HEIDE AND CO., INC, 

International 

Freight Forwarders 
F. M. B. No. 223 

F. M. C. No. 69 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 

TWX No. 919-762-3946 

WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 763-8271 
AND 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 726-5080 
TWX No. 919-255-2929 



W. S. R. BEANE 

President 

L. B. FINBERG 

Exec. Vice-Pres. 



R. H. FUTCHS 
Traffic Mgr. 
E. MAYO HOLMES 
Sec. & Treas. 



MANAGER — MOREHEAD CITY — JACK TILLEY 



F.M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 

FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

1211 McCall Street 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. 0. Box 93 

Atando Station 

Charlotte, N. C. 28286 



Norfolk-Newport News, Va. 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldg. 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn. 
of America, Inc. 



F.M.B. No. 2454 
APPLICATION NO. 70 

waters shipping co. 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 
CUSTOMS BROKER 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE & CO., INC. 

109 Sooth Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



20 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island -Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. 0. DRAWER 31 


TELEPHONES 


726-6151 


726-6152 


CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 


A. C. Smith 
Manager 


PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 


W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice President 


W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice President 


J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 


WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 


LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



Z) 



CARTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Postage 

PAID 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Permit No. 32 



The Unconquerable Hope 



fOft 




POR 



of Mankind Everywhere 



North Carolina World Trade Festival 
Charlotte • May 17-21, 1965 



MOREHEADCITY, N.C. 

P. 0. Box 507 

Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX: 919-255-2995 



NEW YORK 

26 Broadway, Room 767 

New York 4, New York 

Telephone BOwling Green 9-1843 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

P. 0. Drawer 3037, Azalea Station 
Telephone ROger 3-1622 
TWX: 919-762-5661 



"Rt 



North Carolina Sfare LiDrary 



r life- 

k 






$ < 



0t6A Ca/bolitccc 






SUMMER, 1965 




CDff 




to tn'e'sto^e por^So^^n^.'" bUSin6SS JUne '< 19 "- The N. C. Ports Authority oui.t the building and creafed 



a new entrance 



YOU'Vi 



IT 



A 

TRUCK 

BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS, TRUCKING IUIIDING. RAIEIGH 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

' KQM?n'c^ E INSURAN CE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• INSURED CREDIT AN ° P0LIT1CAL R| SKS 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 

• MARINE OPEN CARGO POLICIES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 . WILMINGTON, N. C. 




KAAHMEPA 
means hello 

in Athens . . . 
Wachovia means business! 






If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in 
Athens . . . see Wachovia. A Wachovia International 
Specialist can help you do business better in Greece 
... or anywhere in the free world. His fingers are 
on the economic pulse of six continents. He can 
smooth the way . . . right away . . . for buying and sell- 
ing in every major world market. Wachovia was the 
first bank in the Southeast to win the U.S. Govern- 
ment's coveted new E-for-Export Award. Look to 



Wachovia International for all this . . . and more: 
trade leads/ credit reports/ untangling exchange regu- 
lations/ acceptance financing/ letters of credit/ col- 
lection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



ENGINEERS CHANGE COMMAND 




GRYGIEL 



Lt. Col. Beverly C. Snow, Jr., 
assumed the duties of District Engi- 
neer, U. S. Army Engineer District, 
Wilmington in June. 

Lt. Colonel Snow succeeds Colonel 
J. S. Grygiel, District Engineer for 
the past three years, who has been 
assigned to the faculty of the In- 
dustrial College of the Armed 
Forces, Fort McNair, Washington, 
D. C. 

The Wilmington District is re- 
sponsible for water resource proj- 
ects of the Corps of Engineers in 
central and eastern North Carolina 
and a portion of south-central Vir- 
ginia. (The area includes all port 
terminals of N. C, Morehead City, 
Wilmington, Southport. 

Lt. Colonel Snow, age 41, is the 




son of Colonel Beverly C. Snow, 
Sr., an Army Corps of Engineers 
officer for 34 years, who served as 
District Engineer in Wilmington in 
1946 and 1947. Colonel Snow, now 
retired, and Mrs. Snow, live in 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Lt. Colonel Snow was born in 
San Francisco, California, on Sep- 
tember 29, 1923, and was commis- 
sioned in the Corps of Engineers 
in 1944 upon graduation from The 
United States Military Academy, 
West Point. During World War II 
he served in the 1296th Engineer 
Combat Battalion in the Philippines. 

For the present, Lt. Colonel and 
Mrs. Snow and their two children, 
Nancy, age 14, and Skip, age 12, 
are residing at Wrightsville Beach. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Barber Lines 16 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 20 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. Inside Back Cover 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 17 

Glasgow Hicks Co. 16 

Heide Company, Inc. — Luckenbach Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line 20 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 



Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. 20 

New Hanover County 16 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Front Cover 

North Carolina National Bank 15 

Southern Railway System 17 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 1 

Walker Taylor Insurance Inside Front Cover 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Service, Inc. .__ 20 

Wilmington Shipping Co. . 16 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc. . 17 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 
JOHN M. REEVES. Chairman, Pinehurst 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
WILLIAM B. GLENN, Greenville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS. Fayetteville 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 
HENRY LEE WEATHERS, Shelby 




STATE PORTS 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF N. C. S. P. A. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

ANDREW JACKSON, III, Director of Engineering 



SUMMER ISSUE, 1965, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 11. NO. 2 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 507-Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

CHARLES McNEILL 

Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal— Operations 

P. O. Box 3037-Telephone 

ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 457-2621 

P. O. Box 578 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 
Tel. 829-3855 

Box 149 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Communications 




CONTENTS 



Page 

Southport Dedication 4 

Down Historyland Trail 6 

Luckenbach Comes to N. C. 10 

Hanes Wins "E" 12 

World Trade Festival 13 

Exportunities 14 

4 Facilities of SPA 18 

COVER STORY 

The cover of this issue is an artist's 
conception of the Southport Boat 
Harbor recently opened and operat- 
ing as a facility of the Ports Author- 
ity. Actually, the artist has captured 
a true picture of the facility as it 
looks in operation. The colors are very 
well done, and it was decided to use 
this sketch rather than reproduce an 
actual photograph. Our thanks, there- 
fore, go to the artist whose name ap- 
pears on the cover and to the en- 
gravers who reproduced the art work 
for us. 



GOV. MOORE AND STATE PORTS AUTI 




REMARKS BY GOVERNOR DAN MOORE 

AT DEDICATION OF 

STATE PORTS AUTHORITY BOAT HARBOR 

This is a particularly significant moment for me — 
to come here, as I do, a native of the mountain region 
of our State, to stand on this Southeastern coast, and 
to understand completely the great community con- 
cept that is North Carolina. I cannot remember a 
time when this concept was more obvious to me than 
it is today. 

We do have a great community. North, east, south 
and west, we have almost five million people, all of 
whom are dedicated to one thing: Progress — the 
building of a more abundant life for ourselves and 
all who will follow us. 

Since 1959, when the people of this State voted to 
invest in the future of Brunswick County with the 
approval of a bond issue for improvements here. I 
have followed with great interest the development of 
these port facilities. For this reason I look upon this 
event, not as the climax of an effort, but as a mile- 
stone, as an indication of what can be accomplished 
here in the davs ahead. 




I am convinced that an increasingly prosperous 
future for Brunswick County and all the counties of 
the Southeast is now assured. Energetic action on the 
part of the people of a region creates interest in that 
region. Interest prompts investigation. And. in an 
area where a great potential exists, investigation 
leads inevitably to progress. 

More industrial prospects are looking at this area 
today than ever before. They know that where you 
find land, water, and good, substantial, industrious 
people, you find the basic ingredients for a profitable 
investment. Add all these things to availability of 
ocean shipping lanes, and you have a combination 
that spells magic to industrial developers. 

I want to commend the State Ports Authority on 
the contribution it has made to this day. John Reeves 
and his associates have done an excellent job. 

The Ports Authority's achievements at Morehead 











J _ I 




wta 




r Vi' «V 






Ct^l 


g. g -Jj 


• M ■ 





City and Wilmington are a matter of record. A total 
of 824 vessels, flying the flags of nations from around 
the world, called at these two terminals last year. 

It is interesting to look back on this development. 
Before 1952. the idea that North Carolina could de- 
velop two thriving deep-water ports in little more than 
a decade would have been laughed at. The fact that 
our world trade would go over one billion dollars in 
1964 would have seemed an unattainable goal to most 
people a decade or so ago. 

Many of us here today can remember when the de- 
velopment of our ports into vital contributing factors 
in the State's economy was little more than a dream. 
Today, it is a very obvious reality. The same can be 
said for this small boat harbor. A few years ago, it 
was just an idea. Now. it is a fact. 

And there is no limit to where this development can 
lead. The possibility of its encouraging the develop- 
ment of a major sea food processing industry is very 
real. Already there is an industry being established 
adjacent to the harbor. 

This harbor is a real asset to this community, this 
county and this region. But I think it is also symbolic 
of the future for this area. You are on the move and 
you are going to keep moving. The potential is here 
and we are going to develop that potential. A good 
start has been made. I pledge you my cooperation and 
my enthusiastic interest in the days ahead. 

It is my happy task to dedicate this facility to the 
service of this region, to the progress of North Cai-o- 
lina and to the cause of a better and more abundant 
life for all of our people. 



Walker 



>RITY DEDICATE SOUTHPORT HARBOR 




Reeves 

600 people among them 200 Tar Heels 
Afloat — former Governor Sanford, Con- 
gressmen, Members of Council of State 
and General Assembly listen to Tom 
Walker, Press Secretary to Gov. Moore 
deliver the Govs, talk at Southport dedi- 
cation. Special attention was paid to 
Jim Bowman and Bunn Frink of South- 
port — who worked so long for this proj- 
ect. 



Sanford 

Gov. Sanford praised many others who 
took part and Chairman John M. Reeves 
who serves as Chairman of the Authority 
under 3 Governors received a great ova- 
tion as he expressed thanks to Judge 
Jim Latham, Cooper Cass, E. G. Ander- 
son and L. S. Ficklen who served on the 
SPA committee. 



JOHN M. BEEVES, Chairman 



PORTS AUTHORITY NEW MEMBERS 

Governor Dan Moore recently announced the appointment of the following to the State Ports Authority 
to serve terms expiring June 30, 1971: 




WILLIAM B. GLENN 

William B. Glenn of Greenville, president of 
Carolina Leaf Tobacco Company. He is first 
vice president of the Tobacco Association of 
the United States and has traveled overseas 
extensively promoting the sale of North Caro- 
lina tobacco products. He was born in New 
Bern on October 4, 1921. He served in the 
Army Air Corps in the China-Burma-India 
Theatre from 1942 to 1945. He is an Episco- 
palian. He serves on the advisory board of 
the Salvation Army in Greenville. Mr. Glenn 
married Miss Betsy Evans of Enfield on 
January 24, 1953. They have three children. 




GEORGE PURVIS 

George Purvis of Fayetteville. president of 
LaFayette Motors, president of George Purvis 
Motors, and treasurer of Cape Fear Products, 
Inc. He is active in the work of the Cape 
Fear Industrial Development Committee and 
traveled with the North Carolina trade mis- 
sion to Europe in 1962. Mr. Purvis was born 
in Fredericksburg, Virginia, on February 19, 
1918, and was educated at the University of 
Virginia. He served in the U. S. Merchant 
Marine in World War II. He is a member of 
Holy Trinity Episcopal Church. Mr. Purvis 
and Mrs. Purvis, the former Evelyn Winkler, 
have four children. 




HENRY LEE WEATHERS 

Henry Lee Weathers of Shelby, president 
and publisher of the Shelby Daily Star. Vice 
president of the N. C. Press Association, past 
president of the Associated Dailies of N. C. 
and the Printing Industry of the Carolinas. 
He was born in Shelby in 1913. He was edu- 
cated in the Shelby Schools and Duke Univer- 
sity, class of "35. Served three years with the 
U. S. Navy in World War II. He is secretary- 
treasurer of Shelby Industries Development. 
Inc.. and on the Industrial Committee of the 
Shelby Chamber of Commerce, an elder in the 
Presbyterian Church. Mnrried Miss Lillie 
Taylor in 1939. They have two children. 




ELIZABETHAN GARDEN SCENE 




Edward Teach, or Black- 
beard, acquiring a repu- 
tation for cruelty and 
treachery in the West In- 
dies, he came to Bath 
about 1718, where he re- 
ceived the king's pardon. 
While pretending to have 
abandoned his old career, 
he continued his piratical 
ways with several assists 
from Governor Charles 
Eden of North Carolina 
and the Secretary of the 
Colony, Tobias Knight. On 
November 22, 1718, after 
a savage battle, he was 
killed in Pamlico Sound 
by Lieutenant Richard 
Maynard of the Royal 
Navy. 



DOWN THE HIS' 



Let us go back to the "Land of the Beginnings". 
Fort Raleigh and the Elizabethan Gardens on the 
island called Roanoke, near Oregon Inlet, North 
Carolina is where it all started. 

The Fort has been restored and the Elizabethan 
Gardens, well attended by the Garden Clubs of North 
Carolina, are a major attraction in the area. 

In the olden days of the first settlers, the History- 
land Trail for some led across Croatan Sound to 
what is called the Dare Mainland. Here is a wild and 
desolate savannah country, filled with wildlife and a 
few scattered fishing villages. One in particular has 
a fascinating name — "MASHOES", a small cluster of 
houses at the mouth of Peter Mashoes' Creek. Peter 
Mashoes was a Frenchman who settled there many 
decades ago and, presumably, his name was spelled 
"Micheiux" originally. 

If one followed the early trail of history past 
Mashoes, he would wind up in the Alligator River. 
The old trail must have turned toward the Pamlico 
Sound. Twenty miles or more from Mann's Har- 
bor is a beautiful village known as Stumpy Point. 
No overland traffic went this way in the 17th Cen- 
tury. It was all by boat, and this was the path they 
followed. 

Twenty miles further on in a southerly direction, 
toward the mythical island of Croatan, the History- 
land Trail comes to another village called Engelhard. 
Engelhard is not too far distant from the famous 
Mattamuskeet Lake, where even in the early days of 



RALEIGH'S NEW FOUND LAND— The East 
Coast from Cape Lookout to Chesapeake Bay. This 
has been called "the most careful, detailed piece 
of cartography for any part of North America to 
be made in the 16th century." 







SUNSET AT STUMPY POINT HARBOR. 





-j'tT 



fa 



)RYLAND TRAIL 



pioneer settlers Mattamuskeet was a haven for wild 
fowl. 

Another twenty miles sailing produces another 
bay and another village — Swan Quarter, now, of 
course, the reader must realize that these villages 
are tied together by a Highway (US 264). 

A long cruise of some forty miles takes a traveler 
past the broad reaches of the Pungo River, up the 
Pamlico River to Old Town Creek and the beautiful 
village of Bath. It is here that we find the oldest 
chartered community in the colony of North Caro- 
lina. Bath is famous in story and legend in the His- 
toryland Trail of Eastern Carolina, and despite all 
its good works, the legend that lives on and the ro- 
mance that clings most to its past is the tale of a 
"sea-faring man." 

In the early seventeen hundreds he was known to 
his fellow citizens as Edward Teach. Married to a 
sixteen-year-old daughter of a prominent planter, he 
was a gentleman of considerable material wealth. 
This economic well being had come to pass during 
the years before his retirement to Bath, when his 
name struck terror in the hearts of the sea-coast 
people, all the way south to Barbadoes. 

In the yard of Saint Thomas Church the wanderer 
will find a good link with the past. 

However, for this time our Historyland Trail will 
move on to another town some thirty miles up river, 
which is called the "Original Washington". Wash- 





I 

FISHERMAN — Evidently n composite drawing of night 
fishing with a fire in the canoe and daytime use of the 
dipnet and spear. 







4 1 



t,| III 










VILLAGE OF SECOTON— This Indian settlement was prob»bly located on the south 5 ide 
of the Pamlico River, perhaps near the present, Bonnerton, N. C. This is an example of the 
unenclosed Indian village with houses of pole and mat construction. White probably drew thi> in 
July, 1685 when the three successively planted crops of maize could have reached the stage* 
of growth indicated. 



ington has been a thriving community since the 
early eighteenth century, and a most remembered 
episode seems to be the murder of General Crimes, 
as he drove home one evening from his office in 
Washington to his ancestral home near Grimesland. 
Today all this is legend and history, but the 
names along the Historyland Trail lend a fine flavor 
to the writing. Some of these names are: Chocowin- 
ity, Terra Ceia, Pantego, Kilkenny. Calico, Shel- 
merdine, Krnul. Aurora and Cash Corner. All of these 
are Pamlico River names and if we had the space 
the story behind the names should make good read- 
ing. 



EASTWARD DEDICATION 




*J2Z^i J± 



THE EASTWARD SAILS FROM DOCK OF DUKE MARINE AERIAL VIEW OF DUKE MARINE LABORATORY WITH 
LABORATORY (LEFT, BACKGROUND) WITH THE TOWN OF EASTWARD TIED TO THE DOCK 
BEAUFORT IN THE RIGHT BACKGROUND. 



GOVERNOR'S INDUSTRIAL TOUR SEE 



THE GOVERNOR'S INDUSTRIAL TOUR OBSERVING THE FACILITY OF THE STATE PORT TERMINAL AT WILMINGTON. MANY TOP 
EXECUTIVES ARE VISIBLE— SO ALL WILL REMAIN UNIDENTIFIED, FOR OBVIOUS REASONS. 




ANOTHER FIRST FOR N.C. PORTS 




THE NORTH CAROLINA STATK I'OKT 
TERMINAL AT WILMINGTON PERFORMED 
ANOTHER FIRST IN OCEAN SHIPPING IN 
MAY WHEN FOUR NORTH CAROLINA MAN- 
UFACTURED BOILERS WERE LOADED ON 
ONE VESSEL, HOUND FOR FOUR DIFFER- 
ENT PORTS IN SOUTH AMERICA. 

WALTER FR1EDERICHS, OPERATIONS 

MANAGER AT WILMINOTON. SAID. "THIS 
WAS AN AMAZINC SPECTACLE, AND IN 
VIEW OF THE FACT THAT THIS WAS PRO- 
CLAIMED NORTH CAROLINA PRODUCTS 
WEEK' HY OOVERNOR DAN MOORE, IT IS 
VERY TIMELY." 

BUILT IJY THE BABCOCK & WILCOX COM- 
PANY, THE FM PACKAOE BOILERS WILL 
SUPPLY PROCESS STEAM FOR PRODUCERS 
OF FISH PRODUCTS. TEXTILES. AND FOR A 
SULPHUR MININC OPERATION. 

DURINO THE PAST NINE YEARS OVER 
20 THOUSAND TONS OF LOCALLY MADE 
HAHCOCK & WILCOX PRODUCTS HAVE 
BEEN SHIPPED THROUOH WILMINGTON'S 
NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORT TERMI- 
NAL. ITS LOCAL MANUFACTURING AC- 
TIVITIES HAVE GIVEN WILMINGTON THE 
DISTINCTION OF BEING THE "PACKAGE 
BOILER CAPITAL OF THE SOUTHEAST", 
WHILE ITS EXPORTS HAVE HELPED THE 
CITY TO EARN THE REPUTATION OF BE- 
ING ONE OF THE NATION'S FASTEST GROW- 
ING SEAPORTS. 




rORTH CAROLINA 



For a whole week in June, beginning the 14th, 
Governor Dan Moore showed two hundred of the 
top industrialists of the nation around the state. 

The tour was well organized and conducted in a 
very efficient manner by Wayne Corpening, formerly 
of Winston-Salem and now Special Assistant to the 
Governor. 

Into a crowded schedule of travel by bus and plane, 
beginning at Winston-Salem on the 14th, went one 
hundred twenty guests from out of the state and 
eighty members of firms and enterprises in North 
Carolina, including members of the Port Authority. 

Mr. John M. Reeves, Chairman of the Port Author- 
ity, was honored by Governor Moore, along with 
many others, on the 14th at a Dinner in Winston- 
Salem. Mr. Cooper D. Cass, former member of the 
Authority from Winston-Salem, accompanied the 
group to Asheville and thence to Charlotte, where 



they were joined by Mr. F. H. Ross, Jr., a member 
of the Authority from that city. 

On the 17th, the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority staff received the entire group at the 
terminal in Wilmington. (See photo). 

On Friday, the 18th, Mr. E. N. Richards, a mem- 
ber of the Authority from Raleigh, and Mr. E. G. 
Anderson, a member from Robersonville, joined the 
group for a Luncheon and Dinner, which closed out 
the week's activities. 

The Industrialists were told and observed many 
things during the trip — the advantages to commerce 
and industry of North Carolina of the two fine deep- 
water terminals at Wilmington and Morehead City. 

Governor Moore and many more prominent citizens 
around the state reminded the distinguished visitors 
that Morehead City and Wilmington have been 
labeled the two fastest growing ports of the South 
Atlantic by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. 



LUCKENBACH COMES TO N. C. 



"TOr 






/ F 



c ,f ~ x* 




LEFT TO RIGHT: LUCKENBACH, BEANE, BARKER, DAVIS. 



More than three centuries of corporate service to the maritime industry have been forged into one 
enterprise by Luckenbach Steamship Company with the purchase of Heide & Company. 

Edgar F. Luckenbach, Jr., President of Luckenbach Steamship Company, revealed the acquisition 
of Heide & Company of Wilmington and Morehead City, North Carolina, as a wholly-owned subsidiary, 
to be fully integrated into other Luckenbach steamship and terminal operations in Atlantic and Gulf 
ports. 

Heide & Company, which was founded in 1869, has continuously since that date served the steam- 
ship industry through the two principal ports of North Carolina. In its services to steamship owners 
the Company operates an expanding stevedoring and agency service for regular liner and non-con- 
ference operators serving the United Kingdom, North Europe, Mediterranean and Central and South 
American ports. 

In addition to the acquisition by Luckenbach of Heide, Mr. Luckenbach also announced the purchase 
of Carolina Forwarding Company which acts as freight forwarders and consultants to importers and 
exporters which services will be continued and expanded under the new Luckenbach management. 

Mr. Richard E. Barker has been named Vice President and General Manager of Heide Company, 
Inc. Mr. Barker, formerly Vice President with States Marine Lines, brings to his new responsibilities 30 
years of experience in the steamship business, having held management positions with Alcoa Steamship 
Company as well as States Marine Lines. 

Mr. Richard Futchs, formerly Traffic Manager of Heide & Company, has been appointed to the 
position of Assistant General Manager. 

The new offices for both Heide & Company and Carolina Forwarding Company will be located in the 
recently completed North Carolina Maritime Building in Wilmington, with affiliated offices in 
Morehead City. 

According to Mr. Luckenbach, "The Heide acquisition, following the purchase of Turner & Blanchard, 
which was established in 1867, represents the second important growth step for our Company within 
twelve months. These acquisitions, together with others currently under study, are expected to in- 
crease significantly the scope of Luckenbach maritime activities. Having sucessfully redeployed our 
vessels from intercoastal trade to foreign commerce, the projections for the future appear bright. It is 
interesting to know that within the span of only a few months our Company has acquired holdings that 
together with Luckenbach aggregate 309 years of maritime life". 



10 



ACQUIRES HEIDE AND CO 



The Luckenbach Steamship Company was estab- 
lished in 1850 by two seafaring brothers who served 
as Captain and Chief Engineer aboard the BLUE- 
STONE, a tugboat that plied the waters of Rondout 
Creek, near Kingston, New York. In those days river- 
work was considered high adventure and Edward and 
Lewis Luckenbach were looked upon as men of great 
daring. Despite this romantic reputation they soon 
discovered that the challenges were limited and, filled 
with a desire for new worlds to conquer, entered the 
highly speculative field of deep-sea towing and salvage. 

The clipper ship was the commercial vehicle of that 
era, and it was in the late 1800s that the Luckenbach 
brothers implemented their towing enterprise by run- 
ning up the now familiar burgee pennant to the fore- 
mast of sailing ships destined for foreign ports. There 
followed others, of broader beam and greater sail, 
among them the TILLIE STARBUCK, one of the 
illustrious iron-hulled clipper ships of American mari- 
time history. 




THE LUCKENBACH TERMINALS IN PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

It soon became apparent to the two brothers that 
our nation was expanding westward and that a great 
barrier to progress was the movement of goods and 
machinery from the industrial East to the West where 
they were desperately needed. 

They soon established the first intercoastal service 
with vessels loaded with the products of the industrial 
centers of the Northeast steaming to the new port of 
Colon in Panama, their cargoes then transported by 
Panama Railroad Company cars across the narrow 
Isthmus, to be placed, finally, aboard the Luckenbach 
Pacific vessels for final transport to the Gold Coast of 
California. 

The Panama Canal, became a reality on August 15, 
1914, and on the following day another company record 
was established when the steamer, SS PLEIADES, 
flying the Luckenbach colors, proudly claimed title to 
being the first commercial vessel to make the eastward 
passage through the Canal. Thus, the dreams of these 
men came true: the West, in the commercial sense, 




LUCKENBACH OPERATES IN NEW YORK CITY. 

was joined with the East, and our country became 
united. 

The traditional competition of ship versus ship, 
however, was replaced by water versus rail, and by 
the late 1940s it was apparent that the transcontinen- 
tal railroads were destined to replace the once flourish- 
ing intercoastal water service. So passed the era when 
the famous stackmark and flying red pennant, familiar 
to many Americans along our coasts, could be seen in 
the commission of a trade originated a hundred years 
before. 

The family management, dating back three genera- 
tions, realized that it must conform to our times and 
has embarked on a careful program of diversification 
to meet the challenges of tomororw. The Luckenbach 
ships are currently engaged in the world charter mar- 
ket, steaming over oceans and into ports where cargoes 
await transportation. Broadening its economic base, 
Luckenbach has established itself as terminal opera- 
tors, stevedores and agents in a number of Atlantic 
and Gulf Coast ports. In these new enterprises the 
company serves the interests of the maritime nations 
of the free world. 




THE LUCKENBACH TERMINALS IN TAMPA. FLORIDA. 



11 



N. C. Home Grown Giant Wins "E 



99 






GORDON HANTS LEFT . BOARD CHAIRMAN OF HAKES 
CORPORATION. RECEIVES THE PRESIDENTS "E" FLAG FROM 
ROY L. MORGAN", DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE OF FIELD SERV- 
ICES, V. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE. 



Hanes Corporation was awarded the President's 
"E" rlag for excellence in exports at the North Caro- 
lina World Trade Festival Luncheon, held in Char- 
lotte on May 21. Roy L. Morgan, director of the 
Office of Field Services. U. S. Department of Com- 
merce, presented the flag and citation to Gordon 
Hanes. chairman of the board. Hanes Corporation, 
and president. Hanes Hosiery Division. 

The citation read: "Hanes Corporation has con- 
sistently increased export sales of its women's seam- 




less hosiery in a generally declining market. This 
has been accomplished by high standards of quality 
and service, complete market analysis, improved over- 
seas sales representation, prompt delivery, practical 
packaging, and promotion tailored to indigenous re- 
r. ireir.er.ts. These ie:eym:::ec. rx: r: r.:^rke::r.j: t~" ::~ 
by Hanes Corporation reflect credit on management 
and employees, and on the American system of free 
enterprise." 



JEAN BEAN LEFT . STAMPING-FOLDING. HANES HOSDZRY 
DIVISION". AND MARGARET BREWER, HANES KNITTING DI- 
VISION". SERVED AS HOSTESSES AT THE HANES DISPLAY. 
SHOWN HERE WITH THEM IS JAMES G. HANES. 




"1 



FIRST N. C. WORLD TRADE FESTIVAL 
ROUSING SUCCESS 



Lt. Governor Robert Scott keynotes World Trade 
Week with big ovation at Charlotte Luncheon. Twenty 
people from fifteen countries around the world at- 
tended the Luncheon hosted by the banks of Charlotte 
and attended by one hundred twenty business leaders 
from around the state. 

The N. C. State Ports Authority was host to the 
world visitors from embassies and consulates. 




Exhibits appeared all over Charlotte. Here are 
photos of the Hanes exhibit, for example. This part 
of the festival was pushed by C & D Export Coordi- 
nator. 

The U. S. Department of Commerce also joined 
with the N. C. World Trade Association in supplying 
programs and aids for the week's activities. 

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: PRICE TUCKER AND R. B. CRAW- 
FORD SHOW ROBERT PEEL, RESEARCH DIRECTOR -TECHNI- 
CAL, HANES HOSIERY DIVISION: AND CARL PERKINSON. 
PERSONNEL DIRECTOR, HANES KNITTING DIVISION, THE 
FINE FEATURES OF A KNITTING DIVISION DISPLAY. 



LT. GOVERNOR ROBERT W. SCOTT 

Remarks in Charlotte 

I think, however, that in recent years there has 
been some indication of an increasing realization of 
the inter-relationship between trade and peace. There 
are signs of reduction in trade barriers in recognition 
of its favorable effect on international relations and 
the world economy. 

While we are very much encouraged by the pros- 
pects for improved relations resulting from increased 
world trade, I will not try to tell you that this is 
our only interest in increasing trade or sponsoring 
a meeting such as this one in Charlotte. Frankly, we 
are also very much interested in the effects of in- 
creased world trade on our own economy. 

North Carolina is proud of her rising exports, and 
we want to see them increased even more. In 1960 
we ranked 13th in importance among the 50 states in 
export trade. Today we rank 11th. In the last three 
years 127 N. C. firms have made initial export sales. 
With our diversified industry, we top the nation in 
three categories of exports — tobacco, textiles, and 
furniture. In the calendar year 1963 N. C. exported 
$306.1 million in tobacco: $69.2 million in textiles: 
and $3.5 million in furniture. This same survey in- 
dicated that there were 76,812 employees employed by 
firms engaged in exporting. 

Our pride in our accomplishments and our interest 
in further development does not, however, blind us to 
the fact that world trade is and must be a two-way 
street. North Carolina recognizes its dependence on 
many of your countries for the importation of goods 
and supplies that we are not able to supply for our- 
selves. The gross value of products and commodities 
traded between North Carolina and countries around 
the world last year reached over one billion dollars. 
Over 350 million of this amount was spent on imports 
into our state. A partial list of these imports would 




include such varied items as wool, lumber, clocks, cof- 
fee, tea, rubber, leather, steel — and of course, rum and 
scotch whisky. 

The bond of world trade that binds our state and 
your country together runs deeper than the mere 
exchange of goods. For example, I can think of a 
N. C. firm that manufactures farm implement equip- 
ment which recently moved to a Latin American 
country. This business is providing a tremendous boost 
to the economy of that nation, and it is enabling that 
country to modernize its agricultural methods and 
benefit from an industrial and technical revolution 
with a minimum of hardships. 

Yes, we are interested in improving our country's 
balance of payments position and we are seeking to 
assist our fellow businessmen in acquiring greater 
profits. But we are also interested in providing you, 
at competitive prices, those commodities that we 
produce as a result of our early and now advanced 
industrialization. 

The future for both sides of this two way street 
is very bright. The outlook is for a continuation of 
the trend of steady improvements in imports and ex- 
ports. In 1952 when our two state port terminals were 
dedicated, sixty-four vessels called on the two North 
Carolina ports. Last year 824 ocean going vessels, 
flying the flags of many countries, loaded in or out 
cargoes at these two port terminals. 

I hope that as you enjoy the events here in Charlotte 
this week you will be reminded of this tremendous 
world trade growth and potential. 

We share a common interest in economic progress 
and peaceful cooperation and understanding among our 
great nations. I hope that this occasion will encourage 
us all to work together as citizens of the free world, 
to gain a better, clearer understanding of each other 
and of our common interests and common goals. 



13 



EXPORTUNITIES 



For Increased Sales and Profits 

Canning, Preserving Foods 

France — Canned food products : Pulse. Requests 
replies in French. Societe C. Velly & H. Duperrier, 
15 Ave. de l'Opera, Paris ler, France. 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
E. B. Peabody, Sr. 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Paperboard Mills, Products 

France — Unfinished cardboard (rolls) : 450 to 800 
grs. per square meter, density 1.20, with no foreign 
material; inexpensive; of a quality suitable for cloth- 
ing patterns and templates. M.I.C.E.L., 3 Ave. Aris- 
tide-Briand, Cachan (Seine). 



Grain Mill Products 

France — Raw products for feedstuff 
Etablissements Maurice Riff 
les, Valenciennes, Nord. 



(livestock). 
41 rue du Petit-Bruxel- 



Confectionery 

France — Packaged salted and roasted peanuts, other 
nuts. Requests replies in French. Ets. Jean Salle, 25 
Rue de Paris, Bobigny (Seine). 

Textile Mill Products 

Australia — Fabrics for manufacture of women's 
coats and suits. Rich Creations Pty. Ltd., 50 Flinders 
Lane, Melbourne, Victoria. 

Knitting Mills 

Siveden — Unassorted nylon stockings for women. I. 
Fardby, Galendervagen 1, Goteborg N., Sweden. 

Yarn, Thread Mills, Products 

Australia — Yarns of man-made fiber for manufac- 
ture of fabrics suitable for dresswear, suiting, sports- 
wear, furnishing, industrial use. Bruck Mills (Aus- 
tralia) Ltd., 143 Queen St., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Malta — Continuous nylon filament yarn, type '66' ; 
large quantities. Malta Synthetics Ltd., The Indus- 
trial Estate, Marsa. 

Apparel 

Australia — Exclusive men's and women's outer- 
garments ; direct purchase and agency. Colonial Sales 
Corp. Pty. Ltd., 428 St. Kilda Rd., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Men's, Youths', Boys' Suits, Coats, Overcoats 

Belgium — Ready made outer clothing for men, 
women, children. Comptoir de Vente Chas Macintosh, 
5 Square de l'Aviation, Brussels 7. 

Logging Camps, Logging Contractors 

Belgium — Walnut logs in veneer quality. S. A. 
Bomaco, 1422 Chaussee de Gand, Berchem, Brussels. 

Wood Products 

France — Wooden ash-trays for advertising. Societe 
d'Etudes, de Diffusion & d'Impression — Groupe 
S.E.D.I.P. 84 Rue de Maubeuge, Paris 9e. 



Building Paper, Board Mills 

Hong Kong — Ceiling tiles, acoustical type. Aero 
Trading Co., 28 Electric Road (P. O. Box 13504), 
Hong Kong. 

Industrial Chemicals 

Brazil — Industrial chemicals in general. Requests 
catalogs. Brasvit Comercio Importacao e Exportacao 
Ltda., Rua Francisco Serrador 90, 3° andar, grupo 
301, Caixa Postal 1278 ZC-00, Rio de Janeiro ZC-06, 
Estado da Guanabara. 

Fabricated Rubber Products 

Switzerland — Industrial rubber goods, extruded and 
lathecut. Johannsen & Co., Rennweg 39, 8001 Zurich. 

Farm Machinery 

Malaysia — Lawn mowers, gasoline driven. Ban Guan 
Hin (K. L.) Ltd., 17 & 19 Jalan Siland, Kuala Lum- 
pur. 

Metalworking Machinery 

Australia — Industrial machine tools and production 
tooling equipment. Ferrocast Pty. Ltd., 560 Lonsdale 
St., Melbourne, C.I., Victoria. 

Office, Computing, Accounting Machines 

Belgium — Office machines including calculaters, 
duplicators, accounting machines ; except typewriters. 
Societe d'Importation Directe de Machines Comptables 
— "S.I.D.M.A.C.", 59 Rue Jacques de Lalaing, Brus- 
sels 4. 

Motor Vehicles, Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Belgium — Automobile accessories and parts such as 
rings, valves, cylinders, mufflers. Etablissements R. 
Monoyer S.A., 544-546 Chaussee de Waterloo, Brus- 
sels 6. 

Surgical, Medical, Dental Instruments 

Belgium — Surgical and medical equipment, instru- 
ments, supplies and furniture, all categories, including 
electro-therapeutic apparatus and hospital equipment. 
Requests replies in French. J. Hegelbach & Co., S. A., 
12 Rue de Neufchatel, Brussels 6. 



14 




If your Business is Local . . . National ... or International 



the Bank to 

With more than 65 offices in 12 of the state's 
major cities, North Carolina National is 
ideally set up to provide individuals and 
business firms with a full range of bank 
services throughout the Tarheel State... 

As a member of the Bank Wire System, 
North Carolina National Bank also main- 
tains direct contact with more than 200 
major banks in 63 of the nation's largest 
cities, to serve you instantly and coniiden- 



seeisNCNB! 

tially in every state of the United States... 

And, thanks to the knowledge, experience 
and intimate worldwide connections of its 
International Department, North Carolina 
National Bank is uniquely qualified to serve 
your interests — swiftly and precisely — 
in any corner of the free world. 

For conscientious bank service around 
the corner or around the world, inquire at 
any North Carolina National Bank office. 



NCNB 



North CarolinaNational Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Offices in: Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Statesvillc, Tarfaoro, Wilmington, Winston>Sal*m 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 



W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice-President 



WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice-President 



J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 



LEMUEL L. DOSS. JR. 

Trnffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



N. C. Maritime Bldg. 

State Port Terminal 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No 469 




AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools. 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 




BARBER LINE 

Specialists 
in Handling Tobacco 

Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports to 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, Inc. 



GENERAL AGENTS 



New York 
Cleveland 



Chicago 



17 Battery Place 
Tri-Coast Shipping Co. 
Illuminating Bldg. 
Tri-Coast Shipping Co. 
333 N. Michigan Ave. 



AGENT 
Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



16 



A !9fc 





JIRST- 
CITIZENS 

BANK £ TRUST 
COMMNY 



1 \ 




s>*) 



') 



Whenever shipping worries make you 
grouchy it's time to give one of our Sales 
Representatives a call. He'll have you 
feeling like a cub again in no time. Try us 
and see. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Our 

7865 - Hundredth - 1965 

Anniversary 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondelet Building 
JAckson 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SArotoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Vo. 

109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
WHItahall 4-9120 

F.M.C. Lktme No. 481 



17 




WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses of 396,000 
square feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL: Customs Appraisal Service pro- 
vided in modern appraiser warehouse at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water, and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds with 266,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Ten acres paved open storage, acces- 
sible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
truck and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
dutv. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 



WALTER FRIEDERICHS 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,505 feet long with a 46-foot apron. Capacity — five 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnet 
work and 2-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomo- 
tive crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




Southport Boat Harbor location shown here from 
inland waterway chart. This Southport Boat Harbor 




is located on the southeastern coast line of North 
Carolina, about half way between New York and 
Miami, Florida. 



Southport Boat Harbor is on the Intercoastal 
Waterway, three miles from the Atlantic Ocean. 

Southport Boat Harbor is only eight miles from 
some of the best all-around fishing in the Atlantic. 
Information may be obtained at the harbor as to best 
fishing, their last location, and the latest CG weather 
information. 

A restful haven for crews of yachts who want to 
stop where all facilities for "refueling," "refooding" 
and "reicing" may be found. 



H. A. Schmidt 

Manager 

P. O. Box 577 

Southport, N. C. 

Phone: 919 457-2621 



(see cover) 




CHARLES McNEILL 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 




WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth of 35 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 100,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
and one of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses, totaling 
456,000 square feet, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
— Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on ter- 
minal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. South- 
ern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to Port 
property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization 
cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
also easy level access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cy- 
anide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 
chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern— A&EC Railway 
System and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 

WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 



AMAZING AERIAL VIEW OF N. C. STATE PORT'S WEEKSVILLE FACILITY. NEW BEGUN CREEK IN FOREGROUND. PASQUO- 
TANK RIVER, INLAND WATERWAY AND CAMDEN COUNTY IN BACKGROUND. 

THE GIANT BUILDINGS ARE AVAILABLE FOR WATER RELATED INDUSTRY LEASES — EACH CONTAINS 300,000 SQ. FT. OF 
GOOD INDUSTRIAL SPACE. ALSO, AIRCRAFT RUNWAYS FOR COMPANY TRANSPORT. 

THERE ARE ALSO AVAILABLE OTHER BUILDINGS OF 30,000, 20,000 and 10,000 SQ. FT. FOR ELECTRONICS OR OTHER FABRI- 
CATION OR ASSEMBLY. 

CONTACT L. C. BRUCE, ACTING MANAGER— P. O. BOX 149, RALEIGH, N. C. OR P. O. BOX 717, ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. 



These pages contain photo- 
graphs of the four facilities now 
owned and operated by the 
North Carolina State Ports Au- 
thority. Information on whom 
to contact is contained in the 
data for each one of the facili- 
ties. 




GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island- Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads — Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY INC 

109 South Sixth Street 

Moreheod City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



Line Handling 


Phone I 


63-8491 


WATERFRONT SERVICES, 


INC. 


c/o Waters 


Shipping Company 


P. 


O. Box 118 




Wilmingti 


in, North Carolina 





MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



20 



Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Processors 



Color 



Black & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



ED BROWNING 



Phone RO 36263 
119 Market Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



W7 WITH 

CARTERET . . . 



a^aVaV 



. . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 



Charles Piner & Teen Piner 
Operators 



PA 6-5440 



FM.C. No 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

1211 McCali Street 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. 0. Box 93 

Atando Station 

Charlotte, N. C. 28286 



Norfolk-Newport News, Va. Richmond, Va. 

Citizens Bank Bldg. Travelers Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn. 
of America, Inc. 



F.M.B. No. 2454 
APPLICATION NO. 70 



waters shipping co. 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 
CUSTOMS BROKER 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 
WILMINGTON. NORTH CAROLINA 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Morehead City, North Carolina 

P. O. DRAWER 31 
TELEPHONES 

726-6151 726-6152 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 

PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice President 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



A. C. Smith 

Manager 

W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Troffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



PAID 
f.,»,. No. 33 



Promise 

and Performance 

Go Hand in Hand" 




What we say we will do ... we do! One hundred fifteen years of broad 
maritime services in a great family tradition attest to this every day. 

Supported by the most modern technology, the Luckenbach service 
concept is now being further advanced into new areas of importance 
to shippers. We are proud to announce that Heide Company. Inc., has 
become a Luckenbach Company, with agency, stevedoring and re- 
lated operations embracing both of the great modern ports of 
Wilmington and Morehead City. North Carolina. 

Our objective in all of this is to contribute our utmost to the further 
growth of these strategic ports and the prosperity of the areas served 
by them. 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC 



LUCKENBACH 



Company 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • Forwarding Agents • Stevedores 



arolina Sfate Library 



STATE PORTS 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Barber Lines 16 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 20 

Colorcraft Studios . .. Inside Back Cover 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc .Inside Back Cover 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler ..Inside Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. .. 17 

Glasgow Hicks Co. 16 

Heide Company, Inc. - Luckenbach Back Cover 

Heide Company, Inc. Inside Front Cover 

Hi-Page Co. Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line 20 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. 20 

New Hanover County _. 16 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. .. ...Inside Front Cover 

North Carolina National Bank 1 

Southern Railway System 17 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. .. 19 

Walker Taylor Insurance _. ..Inside Front Cover 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Service, Inc. 20 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 16 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc. 17 



Heide Company, Inc. 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, NX. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 

R. E. BARKER, Vice President & General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

A. P. BLAND, Operations Manager 

W. M. TEACHEY, Traffic Manager 

P. C. WEST, Export and Forwarding 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

P.O. Box 232. Teh (919) 726-5080 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 




A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING IUILDING. RALEIGH 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



North Carolina State Library 




N r 
Ooc 



If your Business is Local . . . National ... or International 



the Bank to 

With more than 65 offices in 12 of the state's 
major cities, North Carolina National is 
ideally set up to provide individuals and 
business firms with a full range of bank 
services throughout the Tarheel State... 

As a member of the Bank Wire System, 
North Carolina National Bank also main- 
tains direct contact with more than 200 
major banks in 63 of the nation's largest 
cities, to serve you instantly and confiden- 



seeisNCNB! 

tially in every state of the United States... 

And, thanks to the knowledge, experience 
and intimate worldwide connections of its 
International Department, North Carolina 
National Bank is uniquely qualified to serve 
your interests — swiftly and precisely ■ — 
in any corner of the free world. 

For conscientious bank service around 
the corner or around the world, inquire at 
any North Carolina National Bank office. 



NCNB 



North Carolina National Bank 

Member Federal Reserve System • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Offices in: Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Statesville, Tarboro, Wilmington, Winston-Salem 




This mural, depicting the Port of Wilmington, circa 1890, was 
presented to the State of North Carolina by Edgar F. Lucken- 
bach, Jr., of the Luckenbach Steamship Company, Inc., of which 
Heide Company, Inc., is a member firm. The mural was painted 
by David Campbell-Taws, an internationally known artist. 

It was developed by the artist after extensive research of the 
year 1890, which was the year of the advent of steamships in 
the South Atlantic. It shows the old Courthouse building, among 
other landmarks at that time, and is believed to be accurate 
in feeling and character of the era. 

The vessels shown are typical of those using the port in this 
period. There are the Intercoastal Schooners which carried the 
bulk of the cargo to and from North Carolina, three big Down 
Easters (broad beamed clippers), and two very typical steamers 
of the period, one from Britain and the other probably from 
continental Europe. It is rather interesting to note that some 
sixty per cent of the traffic was to and from the United King- 
dom due to the port supplying a large proportion of raw ma- 
terials for use of the Royal Navy. 



DECEMBER 2 & 3, 1965 

REEC To Sponsor Export 
Sales Workshop 

The management Institute of Wake Forest College 
will Co-Sponsor Prominent Faculty Members from 
North Carolina & Eastern Seaboard 

Topics to be Studied 

"How To" Aspects of Export Sales 

Export Market Research 

Indirect Export Sales Methods 

Direct Export Sales Methods 

Export-Import Bank Program 

Marine Insurance 

Ocean Freight Service 

Air Freight Services 

Documentation 

Export Credit Regulations 

Applications may be made to Export workshop REEC 
P. 0. Box 1950, Greensboro, North Carolina 

Reg. Fee Including Meals and Instructional Material 
$30.00 

Registration limited to 40 persons — 
Wake Forest College Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



New Board Room 
of Ports Authority 
Receives Mural 

The old Government Steam Cutter was based in North Caro- 
lina and the "Wilmington" was a popular pleasure vessel typi- 
cal of this period. 

The actual handling of the work by the artist has been an 
effort to revive in technique the kind of line drawing popular 
in reproduction during the 1800's. The artist added light color 
in the form of washes to give life and proportion to the subject 
like a large aquatinted book illustration. It is painted on vinyl 
with Acrylic Polymer Paint. 

The mural was accepted by Governor Dan Moore in behalf 
of the State of North Carolina for display in the North Carolina 
Maritime Building. It was presented to the Governor by Mr. 
Luckenbach on the occasion of the dedication of the building 
on September 19, 1965. (See page 4.) 




L. TO R. (SEATED) J. M. REEVES, E. N. RICHARDS (STANDING) W. 
GLENN, E. G. ANDERSON, H. L. WEATHERS. 



British Festival In Charlotte 

NOVEMBER 1-10, 1965 

SIR PATRICK DEAN 

HER Britannic MAJESTY'S Ambassador to the 
United States, Captain Terence O'Neill, Prime Minis- 
ter, Northern Ireland ; Lord Rhodes, Parliamentary 
Secretary to the Board of Trade. 

These are but three of a long list of celebrities from 
our friends across the Seas who will bring part of 
England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland with 
them to Charlotte, North Carolina in November. 

The occasion also helps celebrate the 750th Anniver- 
sary of the Magna Carta, English speaking man's first 
democratic document of government. 

These activities will probably bring together for the 
first time more British Notables and prominent Meck- 
lenburgers and North Carolinians than Charlotte has 
seen since 1780. Truly this will.be a great time for 
Charlotte and all of North Carolina. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

JOHN M. REEVES. Chairman, Pinehurst 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
WILLIAM H. GLENN, Greenville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayettevillc 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 

henry lee Weathers, Shelby 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE PUTS 



: 






WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 



FALL ISSUE, 1965, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 11, NO. 3 



E. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

ANDREW JACKSON, III, Director of Engineering 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 






MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Dwr. 648-Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

CHARLES McNEILL 

Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal— Operations 

P. O. Box 3037-Telephone 

ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 457-2621 

P. O. Box 577 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 
Tel. 829-3855 

Box 149 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 




CONTENTS 



Governor Dedicates Building 4 



Another Tarheel Success 



Down Historvland Trail 



Bulk Facility 10 



Tar Heel Road Rallv 12 



Facilities of SPA 14 



Exportunities 18 



COVER STORY 

The cover in this issue is an exact 
facsimile of the new North Caro- 
lina State Ports Authority flag. 
The flag will be flown on special 
occasions together with the North 
Carolina flag and the Stars and 
Stripes. A pennant has been de- 
signed from the flag for use on 
vessels and boats. We use this 
method to introduce the Ports 
Authority flag in colors to our 
friends. 



GOVERNOR DAN MOORE DEDICATES 




GOVERNOR MOORE ADDRESSES CROWD OF 500 PEOPLE WHILE 
THE CHARMING WIFE OF STATE PORTS AUTHORITY CHR. 
JOHN M. REEVES (FAR LEFTi LISTENS WITH RAYMOND 
BRYAN OF GOLDSBORO AND CHR. REEVES i RIGHT I. 



This Maritime Building represents a milestone 
in the 20-year history of the North Carolina Ports 
Authority. I congratulate Chairman John Reeves 
and the members of the Authority, all of whom 
dedicated themselves and their energies in bring- 
ing this structure to fruition. 

This Maritime Building, designed to house our 
Ports Authority offices and privately-owned port- 
related firms, will cost North Carolina taxpayers 
nothing. 

Although it carries a price tag of 8600,000, the 
structure was financed through commercial bank 
loans, which will be paid off by rental fees paid 
by the private occupants of the building's offices. 
Progress, in this instance, comes very cheaply, 
and this speaks well for the planners of this 
building. 

If we look behind us, we see another dramatic 
evidence of maritime progress. There is the 
nearly completely, $3.5 million dock expansion 
which was authorized by the 1963 General As- 
sembly. 

And, 95 miles north of this building, a further 
expansion of our ports systems is in the prelimi- 
nary stage. I refer to the §9.5 million dry bulk 
facility at Morehead City, which will serve the 
important phosphate and chemical industries of 
Eastern North Carolina. 

As evidence of the growth of our State's mari- 
time industry, shipping has risen at Wilmington 
and Morehead City from 700,000 tons a year to 
900,000 tons a year since 1960. Revenues have 
soared from 3900,000 a year to $1.6 million, and 
ship services have increased from 624 ships a 
year to 834 a year in the five-year period. 

It is estimated that our ports industry repre- 
sents a cash flow of S12 million a year into the 
total State economy, according to the "Philadel- 
phia Formula", which estimates the value of ton- 
nage flow through a port terminal, to the back-up 
community and to the shipper. 



All of the various factors pointing to the 
growth of our State ports have helped North 
Carolina's manufacturing and agricultural indus- 
tries to become so world-trade conscious, that 127 
North Carolina businesses have made their first 
export sales within the past two years. 

The result is that more than 600 North Caro- 
lina shippers, about 80 per cent of whom are 
located west of a line running through Raleigh 
and Rockingham, now use the ports of Wilming- 
ton and Morehead City. 

Notwithstanding the fact that the major rail- 
roads of the South and numerous motor carriers 
serve the two port terminals, the ports cannot 
realize their maximum economic potential until 
modern and efficient highways traverse our State 
from our coast to our mountains. 

This is another of the reasons that we must 
approve the 8300 million road bond issue on 
November 2nd. 

As I emphasized in my message to the General 
Assembly earlier this year, "the State Ports in 
Wilmington and Morehead City are of increasing 
importance to all of North Carolina . . . They 
provide an outlet to world markets for our farm- 
ers, manufacturers, processors and producers of 
raw materials. They put us very much in the 
import and export business." 

I urged the General Assembly then to take nec- 
essary action to develop further our port facilities 
so that they might be utilized more fully and 
effectively. As in all other areas, the members of 
the General Assembly met their responsibility to 
the State Ports. They allocated $4.5 million for 
expansion of the State Ports here and at More- 
head City. 

As is evidenced by the State appropriations, 
North Carolina has great hope for the future 
development of our port facilities. I believe this 
hope is supported by this building we see here 
today. It is with a great deal of pride and appre- 
ciation that I dedicate this North Carolina Mari- 
time Building to the service of all the people of 
our State. 




EDGAR F. LUCKENBACH PRESENTS MURAL TO NORTH CARO- 
LINA (SEE PAGE 2). 



>RTH CAROLINA MARITIME BUILDING 




Crowd gathers before Dedication (12 TV stations carried the story, in addition to the Daily N. C. Press) 




Chairman John Reeves introduces Ports Authority: I to r — W. S. R. Beanc, Almont Shipping Co., Louis Ficklen, former Authority member. Rev. 
Ray Butler, Wilmington, Rev. Hunley Elebash, Wilmington, Mrs. Hunley Elebash, Mrs. James W. Davis of Wilmington, and James W. Davis, Execu- 
tive Director. 




L to r seated: Mayor O. O. Allsbrook, Wilmington, Mrs. E. N. Richards, Raleigh, Mrs. E. G. Anderson, Robcrsonvillc, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Poisson, Jr., Mr. Edgar Luckenbach, Jr., New York (with cigarette), Mr. Williom Glenn, Greenville, (Ports Authority member), Mr. ond Mrs. J. W. 
York (Chairman C & D Board), Mrs. Henry L. Weathers, Mr. Dan Stewart, (Director C & D), Mr. Henry L. Weathers, Shelby, (Member Ports 
Authority). 



TAR HEEL FIRM - LOWE'S C 




LOWE'S CENTRAL OFFICE, 
N. WILKESBORO, N. C. 




EDWIN DUNCAN 
CHR. OF THE BOARD 



Lowe's Companies, Inc. is a rapidly expanding sales organization specializing in building materials, 
lumber, major appliances and household merchandise, totaling over 3,000 items. 

Lowe's was organized in 1952 as successor to a business founded in 1921. The main office at North 
Wilkesboro, N. C. handles all purchasing, accounting, budgeting, merchandising, and other administra- 
tive functions. Daily reports and sales are submitted by each store over a teletype system. 

From its beginning as a small single store operation, the company has grown steadily. Today the 
chain consists of 36 outlets in the nine states of North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Maryland, Dela- 
ware, Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio and Pennsylvania. Since January, 1965, eight new stores have 
been added. 

Although the company specializes in building materials and lumber, which account for about two- 
thirds of sales, Lowe's sales predominately are made up of nationally advertised brand name products. 
The building materials line includes plywood and sheathing, roofing materials, wallboard, ceiling and 
floor tile, doors, windows, and the like. Also, plumbing and heating fixtures and supplies, paint, builders 
hardware, electrical supplies, major and minor household electric appliances, lawnmowers and miscel- 
laneous consumer hardgoods are stocked. Although the business started as a cash-and-carry operation, 
credit sales now represent some 70% of the total revenue. 

Most of the company-owned stores are located on major streets or highways removed from the 
downtown business area. They boast adequate parking space. The typical store comprises over 40,000 
square feet of warehouse space plus sales and display rooms on more than three acres of land. 



LOWE'S CARGO MOVING THROUGH N. C. PORTS. 




fcPANIES, INC. - NATIONWIDE 




CHARLOTTE STORE 




PETRO KULYNYCH 
EXEC. V. PRES. 



Company management has expressed complete 
confidence in the future growth of this area, and 
expect the local store to grow into a first class 
service store, similar to the ones now operating 
in Dover, Washington, and Hagerstown. 

Lowe's attributes their rapid success to their 
business philosophy which is to reduce prices in 
an era of high prices and increasing costs, thus 
making a contribution to the customers they 
serve. 

Lowe's has long been a customer of the N. C. 
State Ports Terminals. The community of interest 
between this North Carolina firm based in the 
Northwestern corner of the State was firmly es- 
tablished several years ago. The savings obtained 
by using the State-owned terminals has meant 
much to the domestic firm now growing nation- 
wide. 




OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 



LOWE'S STORES 




DOWN THE HIS 1 



FIRST FLIGHT -KILL DEVIL 1 




Dare County is famous the world over as the 
place where the Wright Brothers made man's first 
powered airplane flight on Dec. 17, 1903. 

But it is also the home of an organization 
which has dedicated itself for the past six years 
to the proposition that manned flight is a myth. 

Every year on Dec. 17 the Kill Devil Hills 
Memorial Society meets at the Wright Brothers 
National Memorial to commemorate the achieve- 
ments of Wilbur and Orville Wright and their 
famed "Flyer." 

Every year on the eve of that commemoration, 
The Man Will Never Fly Memorial Society Inter- 
nationale meets at near-by Nags Head to prove it 
couldn't be done and to present awards to local 
and national figures who have, the Society claims, 
contributed to "anti-aviation." 

Founded in 1959 by Dr. Ed North and newsman 
Jack Aulis of Elizabeth City and Mrs. Miriam 
Rabb of Raleigh, travel editor of the N. C. Travel 
Information Division, the MWNFMSI now has 
about 300 members — mostly newsmen and women 
and pilots. 

The Society's motto is, "Birds Fly; Men 
Drink." 

There is even a MWNFMSI "national anthem," 
written by Dick Jordan of Manteo to the tune of 
"The Man On The Flying Trapese." The chorus 

is: 

"Oh, lift up your glasses and let's have a round 
To Wilbur and Orville, those men of renown, 



Who taught us to fly without leaving the ground 
And that's what we're doing tonight." 

Astronaut John Glenn attended the society's 
1963 meeting. Its founders claim that his resig- 
nation from the space program was a direct re- 
sult. 

The Society is open "to thinking men and 
women everywhere" and a lifetime membership 
is $1. "Of course, in the case of pilots, that's not 
much of a bargain," its founders warn. 

A typical Society "achievement" was its 1964 
proposal that the N. C. Highway Commission 
build a bridge from Manteo to the moon "because 
there are bridges from Manteo to everywhere else 
and it's the only safe way to get to the moon." 

Another achievement, which the founders stout- 
ly deny, has been increased interest in the annual 
observance of the anniversary of the Wright 
Brothers' first flight. 




NHS* 

MWNFMSI'S OFFICIAL SYMBOL. ARTIST IS LOIS AULIS. 



DRYLAND TRAIL 



.LS, N. C. -DECEMBER 17, 1903 






COL. JOHN GLENN, DR. ED NORTH, LT. COL. CLAIR (PAT) CHENNAULT, USAF, AND MRS. 
MIRIAM RABB. 



" ■ ■ 





DR. ED NORTH AND JACK AULIS. PRESIDENT OK MWNKMSI. 




HERE ARE THE LONG GALLERIES AND THE NEW STORAGE AND BARGE TERMINAL DESIGNED BY SOROS ASSOCIATES FOR THE 
MHC STATE PORT TERMINAL. SOROS IS ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST AND MOST FAMOUS DESIGNERS OF BULK HANDLING 
AND LOADING SYSTEMS. 




HERE THEY HAVE DESIGNED A THREE MILLION TON CAPACITY. 2500 TON PER HOUR LOADER FOR THE PHOSPHATE AND 
ALLIED INDUSTRY NEAR MOREHEAD CITY. 

THE STATE PORTS AUTHORITY WILL CALL FOR BIDS ON THIS CONSTRUCTION PROBABLY AS THIS MAGAZINE COMES OFF 
THE PRESSES. 



NORTH CAROLINA CALLEI 




Since 1710 the flow of commerce across the state H 
the Golden Crescent of the Piedmont follows the ec 
towns and industries. Transportation is the key to 
fine land with better highways and tie them togethei 
will continue to grow & thrive and the mountains | 
$300,000,000 Bond Issue for roads will go a long 
of our highways & railways to countries all over th< 



ON TO RALLY FOR ROADS 




followed a North-South pattern. Notice on the map 
' paved roads and railways of the state with thriving 
Dgress. If we can open up the East & West of our 
progress will tend to move East and West — The Ports 
no longer be a barrier to midwestern traffic. The 
p toward this goal. Our Port Terminals ore extensions 
'orld. (Editorial) 




\ 



WALTER FRIEDERICHS 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Fnederichs, Operations Manager 



WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses of 396,000 
square feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL: Customs Appraisal Service pro- 
vided in modern appraiser warehouse at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water, and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds with 266,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE : Ten acres paved open storage, acces- 
sible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
truck and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,505 feet long with a 46-foot apron. Capacity — five 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnet 
work and 2-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomo- 
tive crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




Southport Boat Harbor location shown here from 
inland waterway chart. This Southport Boat Harbor 




is located on the southeastern coast line of North 
Carolina, about half way between New York and 
Miami, Florida. 



Southport Boat Harbor is on the Intercoastal 
Waterway, three miles from the Atlantic Ocean. 

Southport Boat Harbor is only eight miles from 
some of the best all-around fishing in the Atlantic. 
Information may be obtained at the harbor as to best 
fishing, their last location, and the latest CG weather 
information. 

A restful haven for crews of yachts who want to 
stop where all facilities for "refueling," "refooding" 
and "reicing" may be found. 



H. A. Schmidt 

Manager 

P. O. Box 577 

Southport, N. C. 

Phone: 919 457-2621 



(see cover) 



I 



CHARLES McNEILL 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 




WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth of 35 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 100,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
and one of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses, totaling 
456,000 square feet, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
— Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on ter- 
minal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. South- 
ern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to Port 
property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization 
cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
also easy level access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cy- 
anide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 
chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern— A&EC Railway 
System and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 

WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 



AMAZING AERIAL VIEW OF N. C. STATE PORT'S WEEKSVILLE FACILITY. NEW BEGUN CREEK IN FOREGROUND. PASQUO- 
TANK RIVER, INLAND WATERWAY AND CAMDEN COUNTY IN BACKGROUND. 

THE GIANT BUILDINGS ARE AVAILABLE FOR WATER RELATED INDUSTRY LEASES — EACH CONTAINS 300.000 SQ. FT. OF 
GOOD INDUSTRIAL SPACE. ALSO, AIRCRAFT RUNWAYS FOR COMPANY TRANSPORT. 

THERE ARE ALSO AVAILABLE OTHER BUILDINGS OF 30.000, 20.000 and 10,000 SQ. FT. FOR ELECTRONICS OR OTHER FABRI- 
CATION OR ASSEMBLY. 
CONTACT L. C. BRUCE, ACTING MANAGER— P. O. BOX 149. RALEIGH, N. C. OR P. O. BOX 717, ELIZABETH CITY, N. C. 



These pages contain photo- 
graphs of the four facilities now 
owned and operated by the 
North Carolina State Ports Au- 
thority. Information on whom 
to contact is contained in the 
data for each one of the facili- 
ties. 




r*4 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 



W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice-President 



WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice-President 



J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 



LEMUEL L. DOSS. JR. 
Trnffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



N. C. Maritime Bldg. 

State Port Terminal 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No 469 



AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 



MARINE INSURANCE 



Export Credit Insurance 



105 MURCHISON BUILDING 



PHONE ROger 2-9691 



P.O.BOX Ki7> 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 




BARBER LINE 

Specialisfs 
in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports to 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, Inc. 



GENERAL AGENTS 



New York 
Cleveland 



Chicago 



17 Battery Place 
Tri-Coast Shipping Co. 
Illuminating Bldg. 
Tri-Coast Shipping Co. 
333 N. Michigan Ave. 



AGENT 
Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



16 



\ 



A !?fc 




Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




• ' \;>y££»?£*cZ-'/r*"~r7&v»^ 



If you're looking for a "sure thing" when 
you're shipping to, from or within the 
South, give Southern the haul. We take 
the gamble out of transportation. Try 
us next time and see for yourself. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Our 

7865 - Hundredth - 1965 

Anniversary 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Corondclet Building 

JAckton 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SAratoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 

109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 

WHItehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 4il 



J 



17 



EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



or 



E. B. Peabody, Sr. 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



For Increased Sales and Profits 

Canning, Preserving Foods 

Finland — Canned fruits, vegetables, sea foods, spe- 
cialty foods, juices, jams, related items; requests 
descriptive literature, price lists, terms. Oy Provag 
Ab, Etelarantatie 10A, Helsinki. 

Bakery Products 

Belgium — Biscuits, cookies, all kinds. Agency and/ 
or direct purchase for Belgium, Germany, Nether- 
lands, France. Probisco, 6 Rue Docteur Huet, Brussels. 

Trinidad, W.I. — Biscuits, crackers, pretzels, similar 
"dry" bakery products. Grell & Co., Ltd., 60 St. Vin- 
cent St., Port of Spain. 

Girls', Children's, Infants' Outerwear 

Netherlands Antilles — Dresses, blouses, shirts for 
children, infants. Tienda Oduber (J. H. Oduber), 
Nassaustraat 83, Oranjestad, Aruba. 



Industrial Chemicals 

Taiwan — Chemicals used in textile manufacture, 
paper making, leather industry. Hsenme Trading Co., 
107, Section 2, Kwei Yang St., Taipei. 

Venezuela — Industrial chemicals for textile, phar- 
maceutical industries. Representaciones y Equipos 
Marte, S.A., Aptdo. 349, Caracas. 

Drugs 

Trinidad, W.I. — Biological products, medicinal 
chemicals, botanical products, pharmaceutical prep- 
arations. Grell & Co., Ltd., 60 St. Vincent St., Port of 
Spain. 

Agricultural Chemicals 

Taiwan — Wide variety of agricultural pesticides. 
Formosa Chemical Supply Co., Ltd., 31 Section 1, 
Chung King, South Rd., Taipei. 

Fabricated Rubber Products 

Iraq — Rubber tile; rubber cement. Hassani AI- 
Kadhum, Dafterdar Bldg., 6th Fl., Samawal St., Bagh- 
dad. 

Footwear 

Netherlands Antilles — Dress shoes: babies' sizes. 
Tienda Oduber (J. H. Oduber) Nassaustraat 83, 
Oranjestad, Aruba. 

Metalworking Machinery 

Belgium — All kinds of small portable power driven 
hand tools. Ferunion S.A., 19-23 Rue de l'Escaut, 
Brussels 2. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Taiwan — Woodworking machinery for manufacture 
of furniture. Hung 1 Cheng Furniture Works, 319 
Chung, Cheng Rd., Canghua, Taiwan. 



LL 



Venezuela — Machinery for metalworking shops, 
mainly machine tools, metal forming machines. Rep- 
resentaciones y Equipos Marte, S.A., Aptdo. 349, 
Caracas. 

Office, Computing, Accounting Machines 

Taiwan — Office supplies and equipment. Bank In- 
dustrial Co. Ltd., 90A Hwai Ning St., Taipei. 

Service Industry Machines 

Venezuela — Commercial cooking and food warming 
equipment; commercial dishwashing machines; air 
conditioning units for domestic, commercial and in- 
dustrial use. Elkin Montoya Correa — "Set Gas", 
Aptdo. 11456 Este, Caracas. 

Household Appliances 

Finland — Household appliances, equipment, related 
items. Interested in full range of products. Electric 
appliances must be for 220 v., 50 cycle, a.c. Requests 
full details, brochures, price lists. Helkama Oy, Vat- 
tuniemenkatu 27, Helsinki-Lauttasaari. 

Communication Equipment 

Belgium — Radio communication transmitters and 
receivers. Small electronic, pocket size, person loca- 
tors, for use in factories. Icorat S.A., 55 Rue du Mar- 
teau, Brussels 4. 

Germany — Commercial telecommunications equip- 
ment; microphones. Agency for W. Germany, Austria, 
Switzerland and/or direct purchase. Intermess In- 
genieurbuero Arno A.U. Preihs, 46 Westendstrasse, 6 
Frankfurt am Main 1. 

Motor Vehicles; Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Australia — Spare parts for automobiles, tractors, 
construction and agricultural eguipment. Overseas 
Business Associates Pty. Ltd., 161 Fitzroy St., St. 
Kilda. 

Photographic Equipment 

Germany — Sound movie equipment, 16 mm. Agency 
for West Germany, Austria, Switzerland and/or direct 
purchase. Intermess Ingenieurbuero Arno A.U. Preihs, 
46 Westendstrasse, 6 Frankfurt am Main 1. 

Musical Instruments, Parts 

Australia — Musical instruments, accessories. Rose 

Morris & Company (Aust.) Pty. Ltd., 8 — 14 Ross 
Street, South Melbourne, Victoria. 

Toys, Amusement, Sporting Goods 

Netherlands Antilles — Toys for infants and chil- 
dren. Tienda Oduber (J. H. Oduber), Nassaustraat 
83, Oranjestad, Aruba. 







moshi-moshi 
means hello 

in tokyo... 
Wachovia means Business! 



If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in 
Tokyo . . . see Wachovia. A Wachovia International 
Specialist can help you do business better in Japan . . . 
or anywhere in the free world. His fingers are on the 
economic pulse of six continents. He can smooth the 
way . . . right away . . . for buying and selling in every 
major world market. Wachovia was the first bank in 
the Southeast to win the U.S. Government's coveted 



new E-for-Export Award. Look to Wachovia Inter- 
national for all this . . . and more: trade leads/ credit 
reports/ untangling exchange regulations/ acceptance 
financing/ letters of credit/ collection of drafts. 



BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island — Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact' A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

109 South Sixth Street 

Morehead City, N. C. 

Telephone PArk 6-5080 or PArk 6-3652 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



20 



Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Processors 



Color 



Block & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 

Phone P.O 36263 
119 Market Street 
ED BROWNING Wilmington, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



CTTj 



\x7 w,TH 

CARTERET . . . 




. . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 



Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 



Charles Piner & Teen Piner 
Operators 



PA 6-5440 



F.M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

1211 McColl Street 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. 0. Box 93 

Atando Station 
Charlotte. N. C. 2S2S6 



Norfolk-Newport News, Va. 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldg. 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc. 



F.M.B. No. 2454 

APPLICATION NO. 70 



waters shipping co. 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 
CUSTOMS BROKER 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Morehead City, North Carolina 

P. O. DRAWER 31 

TELEPHONES 

726-6151 726-6152 



CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 

PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice President 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



A. C. Smith 

Manager 

W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice President 

J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 

LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR. 

Traffic Monager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



SULK RATE 
U- S. Pottage 

PAID 

Rololah. N. C. 
Permit No. 37 



In the 
Spirit of 1869 




The integrity, imagination and dependable performance of Heide 
Company, Inc. today is in the same spirited "do-it-well" credo that 
has prevailed since the Company was founded 96 years ago. 
These traditional qualities are blended with the most modern 
methods and equipment to provide complete agency, stevedoring 
and related services in the two great North Carolina Ports of 
Wilmington and Morehead City. 

We are proud and privileged to be partners of the North Carolina 
State Ports Authority in their dynamic growth. 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC 



ided IsiV 



LUCRENBACH 



Company 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • Forwarding Agents • Stevedores 



I 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



N. Q 

Oc 



STATE PORTS 



Winter, 1964 







'*■ "ijt^^t. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 23 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad __22 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County 17 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. Inside Front Cover 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 24 

Glasgow Hicks Co. 23 

Heide Company, Inc. - Luckenbach Back Cover 

Heide Company, Inc _ Inside Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line 22 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Front Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. 22 

New Hanover County 23 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co. 17 

North Carolina National Bank 21 

Southern Railway System Inside Front Cover 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 1 

Walker Taylor Insurance _.__24 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Service, Inc. 22 

Wilmington Shipping Co ..___ 23 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc. 24 



MOREHEAD CITY SHIPPING 
COMPANY 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents - Stevedores 
Licensed Customhouse Brokers 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. 0. DRAWER 31 


TELEPHONES 


726-6151 


726-6152 


CABLE ADDRESS 
MORESHIPCO 


A. C. Smith 
Manager 


PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 


W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice President 


W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice President 


J. P. WILSON 

Treasurer 


WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 


LEMUEL L. DOSS, JR 

Traffic Manager 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 376 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No. 469 



mi wi ™ 



T 

CARTERET 



• • • 




. . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 



Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 



Charles Piner & Teen Piner 
Operators 



PA 6-5440 




JA 



A. 




— "£>©UA*UAI 



Hunting for the best way to ship freight 
to, from and within the South? You can 
now rest easy. You've found it. South- 
ern. Try us and see. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



' \ 




(Buten %z% 
means hello in 

©usseldorf . . . 
^achotoia means business; 

If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in 
Dusseldorf . . . see Wachovia. A Wachovia Interna- 
tional Specialist can help you do business better in 
West Germany ... or anywhere in the free world. 
His fingers are on the economic pulse of six conti- 
nents. He can smooth the way . . . right away . . .for 
buying and selling in every major world market. 
Wachovia was the first bank in the Southeast to win 
the U.S. Government's coveted new E-for-Export 



Award. Look to Wachovia International for all this 
. . . and more: trade leads/ credit reports/ untangling 
exchange regulations/ acceptance financing/ letters of 
credit/ collection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 




Luckenbach Appoints Captain Karl 
F. Jensen Assistant Superintendent, 
Stevedoring And Terminals 

The appointment of Captain Jensen was announced by Mr. Edgar 
F. Luckenbach, Jr., President, Luckenbach Steamship Company, Inc., 
effective January 1, 1966. 

Captain Jensen assumes his new post with wide experience in all 
phases of stevedoring and terminal operations in United States and 
Canadian Ports. He has served in the Royal Danish Navy and as 
Master and Mate of Danish merchant vessels and was recently asso- 
ciated with Torm Lines as Port Captain in New York. 

Captain Jensen completed his education in Denmark, is an Ameri- 
can citizen and resides in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey. 



Fortnightly Service For Morehead City 
Announced By Belgian Lines 

BEGINNING JANUARY 8, 1966 BELGIAN LINES WILL OFFER TWO SAILINGS MONTHLY 
TO AND FROM ANTWERP, ROTTERDAM, AND AMSTERDAM. 

ARRIVALS— MOREHEAD CITY 
ARE AS FOLLOWS: 

JANUARY 22 TENIERS 

FEBRUARY 5 RUBENS 

FEBRUARY 19 LINDI 

MARCH 5 LUSIRA 

MARCH 19 RUBENS 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., AGENTS 

. 







MRS. VIRGINIA POU DOUGHTON SHOWS CAPTAIN PIER BAUTIER AND DOMENICO LA CAPRIA, BO'SUN, OF THE S.S. 
FRANCA HOW TO SPLICE A LINE NORTH CAROLINA STYLE. MRS. DOUGHTON, A NATIVE OF RALEIGH HAS SPENT 
MANY YEARS IN MOREHEAD CITY SAILING AND IS CONSIDERED TO BE AN EXPERT IN NAUTICAL LORE. THERE IS 
A DIFFERENCE, WE ARE TOLD, IN LINE SPLICING AN THE NORTH CAROLINA METHOD IS READILY RECOGNIZABLE 
TO THE EXPERT AND IS CONSIDERED A BETTER SPLICE. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

JOHN M. REEVES. Chairman, Pinehurst 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersom illc 
WILLIAM B. GLENN, Greenville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 
HENRY LEE'WEATHERS. Shelb\ 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE PORTS 




WINTER ISSUE, 1966, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 11, NO. 4 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. O. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON. Tobacco Supt. ' 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal— Operations 
P. O. Box 3037-28403 
Tel. 919 ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 119-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 






CONTENTS 

Page 

Authority Chairman Receives Award 4 

Athey of Raleigh 5 

Down Historyland Trail 6 

Lumber from Brazil 8 

World Tobacco Markets 10 

Facilities of SPA 14 

Ports Authority Develops Waterside Industry 16 

Destination Fort Macon 18 

South Atlantic & Caribbean Ports Asso. 18 

N. C. World Trade Asso. 20 

COVER STORY 



The cover of this issue is a very fine 
picture of the graceful curve of the Herbert 
C. Bonner Bridge. This is a tribute of the 
Ports Authority to the memory of a man 
who did a great deal above and beyond 
the call of duty while a Member of Con- 
gress to help the progress and expansion 
of the N. C. State Ports. 

While honoring his memory, the Ports 
Authority offers a view seldom seen by 
many of our readers the famous Oregon 
Inlet, which is the inlet in North Carolina 
nearest famous Roanoke Island, site of 
Raleigh's colony 1585. 

Historians of neighboring states and 
friends everywhere are thus reminded that 
North Carolina was the site of the first 
English Colony in the United States, and 
that the Albemarle area of North Carolina 
dates back to the early sixteen hundreds. 
(See story on pages 6 & 7) 



STATE PORTS 




AUTHORITY CHAIRMAN RECEIVES AWARD 



Pinehurst. X. C. — John Mercer Reeves of Pine- 
hurst was awarded the Sandhills Kiwanis Club 
Builder's Cup at Annual Ladies Night Banquet, 
held in the Carolina Hotel at Pinehurst. This 
coveted award is presented to a man or woman of 
Moore County, who by "Unselfish personal ser- 
vice, without hope of personal gain, has outstand- 
ingly contributed to the upbuilding of the Sand- 
hill section". Reeves, a native of Surry County. 
North Carolina, is Chairman of the North Caro- 
lina Ports Authority, appointed by former Gov. 
Luther Hodges, a position he held under Gov. 
Terry Sanford and now under Gov. Dan Moore. 
In the presentation words of William P. Saunders, 



of Southern Pines, former Director of Dept. of 
Conservation & Development, in Raleigh, "The 
story of the progress of N. C. Ports Authority 
Expansion at Wilmington and Morehead City 
since he became chairman is one of the most re- 
markable sagas of achievement in the entire his- 
tory of the state." 

Mr. Reeves is active in the N. C. Textile Foun- 
dation, has given generously to improvements of 
Moore Memorial Hospital, at Pinehurst, and 
through his generosity* a new Boy Scout Camp 
is now underway on the 2,000 acre reservation in 
Moore County, recently acquired by the Occono- 
neechee Council. 



JOHN MERCER REEVES. AT RIGHT. OF PINEHURST. N. C. RECEIVES THE SANDHILLS KIWANIS CLUB'S BUILDERS CUP. 
FROM WILLIAM P. SAUNDERS. OF SOUTHERN PINES. N. C. A KIWANIS MEMBER, WITH MRS. JOHN M. REEVES. AT 
LEFT. THE PHOTO WAS MADE LN THE PLNEHURST HOME OF MR. & MRS. REEVES. DUE TO MR. REEVES RECOVERY 
FROM A RECENT ILLNESS. 




Herr.mtr Photo 




ATHEY EARTH MOVER 
CALLED BOTTOM DUMP 
LOADED ON CAR IN 
RALEIGH PLANT— ONE 
OF EIGHT IN SHIPMENT 
—NOTE SIZE. 



Garria Photo 



from ATHEY of Raleigh 

to NEW DELHI, INDIA 



Dateline Wilmington, North Carolina. 

The Athey Products Corporation of Raleigh, 
North Carolina, moved eight pieces of earth equip- 
ment to the North Carolina State Port Terminal 
at Wilmington, North Carolina on December 27. 

M. F. Hunter, Export Sales Manager of the 
Athey Products Corp., announced : "the order 
consisting of eight Athey PW 630-S Bottom 
Dumps, 55 ton, 36 cubic yard capacity, was placed 
by their dealer, Tractor & Equipment Corpo- 
ration, Limited, New Delhi, India. These units 
were designed and manufactured at our new 
facility in Raleigh, N. C. The units were sold by 
our dealer to Neyveli Lignite Corporation, Ltd., 
(Madras State) India. 



Also of interest is a spare parts order for the 
eight PW 630-S Bottom Dumps to assure the 
mining company of a minimum of down time." 

For many years Athey Products has designed 
and engineered products for that country. To- 
day, a visitor to India can see Athey mining 
machines at work in a variety of mining and con- 
struction work. 

Photos of the loading were made at Wilming- 
ton, on Monday afternoon, Jan. 3, and the N. C. 
State Port's officials announced that this was a 
culmination of a long series of conferences begun 
when Athey Products Corporation located in Ral- 
eigh. 



f T * & - 



ATHEY BOTTOM DUMPS— BE- 
ING MOVED TO SHIPBOARD 
AFTER ARRIVAL IN WILMING- 
TON FROM RALEIGH. 





DOWN THE HIS 1 



THESE OLD CANNON' COMMAND THE 
HARBOR OF COLONIAL EDENTON. 



By P. D. Midqette former State Senator and Xow 
President, X. C. Coastal Historyland Association 

North Carolina Coastal Historyland Association was conceived and incor- 
porated as a non-profit organization in the spring of 1963, its primary purpose 
being to sponsor and assist in the restoration and preservation of historic sites 
in that area of North Carolina lying between Virginia and South Carolina and 
east of Interstate 95. 

It would be difficult to find an area of similar size which has a greater his- 
torical heritage and at the same time, one that has been so grossly neglected. 
For many years North Carolina has been recognized as a land of FIRSTS and 
the location of the large majority of these first is in the area comprising the 
Coastal Historyland : 

FIRST attempt of English colonization in America 

FIRST "White child born of English parents 

FIRST Teaparty 

FIRST resolution proclaiming independence 

FIRST flight by man in a heavier-than-air machine, to mention a few — 

The oldest Church, the oldest incorporated town, the first state capitol. the 
first library in State. 

The battle which proved to the British that Tory strength in North Caro- 
lina was largely a myth and could not be depended upon (Moore's Creek 
Bridge). 

The Tuscorara Indian wars which all but annihilated the colony were fought 
entirely within the area of the Coastal Historyland. A great deal of research 
would be required to establish the exact locations of the high spots of the wars. 

One of the major turning points of the Civil War was the fall of Roanoke 
Island in 1862. which lost to the Confederacy the transportation system pro- 
vided by the inland sounds and rivers, and also the granary of the rich 
Albemarle-Pamlico area. The importance of this loss can be more readily un- 
derstood by pointing to the fact that the Cape Fear area with its blockade 




A GEM OF EARLY MILITARY ARCHI- 
TECTURE. FORT MACON PLAYED AN 
IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE CIVIL WAR 
AND IS TODAY RESTORED AS A STATE 
PARK. THE FORT STANDS AT THE 
ENTRANCE TO THE MOREHEAD CITY- 
BEAUFORT HARBOR. 




-SOMERSET PLACE" IN PETTIGREW 
STATE PARK BETWEEN PLYMOUTH 
AND COLUMBIA. BL'ILT ABOUT 1790, IS 
A FINE EXAMPLE OF COASTAL PLAN- 
TATION HOUSES OF THIS PERIOD. 



DRYLAND TRAIL 




TRYON I'AI.ACK. COM PI.ETED IN 1770 



runners furnished the major source of supply for 
the Confederate army up to the battle of Benton- 
ville which was the last major encasement of the 
Civil War and was fought on Coastal Historyland 
ground. 

Proof of the effectiveness of air craft against 
naval power was demonstrated by Billy Mitchell 
operating from an improvised base on the Outer 
Banks (General Mitchell was court martialed for 
his achievement.) 

The colorful pirate, Blackboard operated in this 
area until he was captured and slain at Ocracoke 
— a fact that would appeal to the venturesome 
type. 

During the Colonial and Ante-Bellum eras there 
developed in the Coastal Historyland area a way 
of life that was the envy of the nation. Beautiful 
homes were built in great number throughout the 
area. Many of these have been preserved, but 
unfortunately far too many have not been. One 
of the primary objectives of the Association is to 
halt the further deterioration of these buildings 
and bring about their restoration. 

Another objective is to educate the people and 
make them appreciative of what we have. People 
who live with an old building, or an historic site, 
from day to day have a tendency to treat them as 
commonplace and of no particular value. This is 
a state of mind which the Association hopes to 
eradicate. This is a challenge that has been ac- 
cepted by five area development groups within 
the Historyland area. Historyland hopes to co- 
ordinate the efforts of these groups. 

Basically the objectives of Historyland are cul- 
tural and educational, however the economic angle 
cannot be denied. In this day of good roads, easy 
travelling conditions and spare time it is felt that 
in order for our area to get its fair share of the 
travel dollar we must exploit every resource. To 
date the appeal to the travelling public has been 
based on sports and recreation, yet it is a known 
fact that to a large number of people historic 
sites and shrines are a powerful magnet — Item: 
Tryon Palace and the Battleship North Carolina. 
Other areas with much less to offer have for 
years been cashing in on what they have while 
we have been draging our feet. Coastal History- 
land believes that it is time for us both to develop 
an interest, knowledge and pride in what we have, 
and also, to advertise these attractions to t-iie 
world. 




THE HOUSE IN THE HORSESHOE NEAR DEEP RIVER IN MOORE 
COUNTY— SCENE OF WHIG-TORY SKIRMISH OF 1781. 




THE CAPTURE OK PLYMOUTH. OCTOHKR 81, 1864. FROM \ 
DRAWING. 



LUMBER FROM BRAZIL 




LUMBER HEADY TO MOVE TO MARKET. 



by F. H. Wall, Jr. 
Pat Brown Lumber Corp. 

Here are facts concerning a large shipment of 
lumber from Brazil which arrived at Wilmington 
on board the KALLIANAIX. 

The shipment contained approximately one 
million board feet of lumber which may be the 
largest number of board feet of lumber ever 
unloaded at a North Carolina port from one 
vessel. 

This lumber primarily will be used by the 
furniture industry in this immediate area 
with approximately 70 to 75 % of the ma- 
terial being used in the states of North Caro- 
lina and Virginia. 

The entire shipment of lumber was produced 
in Brazil and is made up of three different 
species which grow there. 



(L.) FLETCHER WALL, OF PAT BROWN LUMBER CO., TALKS TO WALTER FRIEDERICHS, OPERATIONS MANAGER, WILMINGTON (r). 
ABOUT SHIPMENT FROM BRAZIL. 





UNLOADING. 

From the standpoint of different species of 
trees available, these species only represent 
about 5% of the different types of trees which 
we have available in the forests where we are 
working as there are approximately sixty dif- 
ferent species of trees growing in the area. 
The shipment represents about five weeks 
of our production capacity in Brazil and this 
production capacity has been attained over a 
period of four years from the time we initially 
started our operation in Brazil. 
The production is the result of new sawmill 
machinery and equipment being erected there 



and the acquisition of timber holdings in the 
area in access of 180,000 acres. 
Because of the extremely difficult and remote 
conditions under which we have to work down 
there, the operation is supported by major 
equipment which is absolutely necessary such 
as eight tugboats to move rafts of logs to the 
mills by rivers ; three open top barges which 
are necessary to transport logs which will not 
float; a twin-engine Amphibian Grumman 
Widgeon which is used to transport personnel, 
machine parts, and supplies to the mill sites. 
No landing strips are available and it is neces- 
sary for landings to be made on the river 
itself. 

At present there are seven Americans living 
and working in the area concerned with the 
supervision of the logging operations, the pro- 
duction at the mills, and the preparing of 
cargos for shipment, as well as qualified pilots 
for transporting men and supplies in the Am- 
phibian aircraft. 

We feel that by operating in these remote areas 
there, and providing steady employment for peo- 
ple who have never enjoyed such a situation be- 
fore, plus the investment in physical equipment 
and the dollars which are being sent into that 
country to support the operation- — that we are in 
some small way helping to cement the relation- 
ship between our country and all of the countries 
in Latin America from which we import lumber. 
Surely more trade and better relationships are 
badly needed at this time. 



WALL AND FRIEDERICHS SEE LUMBER REMOVED FROM HOLD. 




WORLD TOBACCO MARKETS - 

Prospects and Problems 



r 


> 




1 



I greatly appreciate this opportunity to discuss 
some recent developments in the world tobacco 
situation. 

To assure a continuing high level of foreign 
trade it is important that consumers here and 
abroad get accurate information regarding U. S. 
tobacco. 

One of the important barometers of world to- 
bacco activity is the level of world cigarette out- 
put. It is a key factor affecting world trade in 
tobacco. 

I want to examine with you here today the 
recent trends in world cigarette output. Along the 
way I will discuss some of the problems relating 
to "tobacco and health" and their impact on 
world cigarette output and trade. 

With the recent dramatic advances in trans- 
portation and communication we live today in a 
small world. Events of economic, military or polit- 
ical significance happening in any part of the 
world are known to most other parts of the world 
in a matter of minutes or hours. 

The U S. plays a dominant role in the world 
tobacco economy; consequently, most foreign 
countries follow developments here very closely. 
The United States is: 

(a) The world's largest producer of tobacco 

(b) The world's largest producer of cigarettes 

(c) The world's largest exporter of tobacco 

(d) The world's largest exporter of cigarettes 

(e) The world's third ranking importer of to- 
bacco. 

In addition, the United States conducts the 
most extensive research on tobacco and tobacco 
products of any country in the world. 

High quality cigarettes in all parts of the world 
are made from U. S. leaf or a blend containing 
U. S. leaf. 



Summary of remarks by Hugh C. Kiger, Director, Tobacco 
Division, Foreign Agricultural Service, U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, at the annual meeting of the Tobacco 
Growers Information Committee, at Raleigh, A 7 . C, No- 
vember 1, 1965. 



Consumers around the world continue to show 
a preference for cigarettes made from light to- 
bacco. Consequently, changes in cigarette output 
have an important influence on the usings of 
flue-cured, light air-cured and oriental tobaccos. 

During the period 1956-63 the percentage rise 
in world cigarette output from the preceding year 
averaged about 4.6 percent annually. 

New records in cigarette production are being 
established each year, but recently the upward- 
trend has slowed somewhat because of the effects 
of the smoking and health controversy in some 
important consuming countries and because of 
general higher cigarette prices. 

Nevertheless, world cigarette output in 1964 
totalled about 2,526 billion pieces — up 2.8 percent 
from the 1963 level. However, this represents a 
50 percent rise in the past decade. 

It now appears that the rise in world cigarette 
production during the next few years will be in 
the range of 3 to 4 percent annually. 

The increasing world population and improved 
economic conditions will help insure this increase. 
Even with the smaller rate of increase, however, 
a 1975 world output of cigarettes is likely to be 
over 3.000 billion pieces annually. 

On an overall basis it appears that the smoking 
and health controversy has been a factor in the 
following developments : 

(1) There has been a rapid increase in the out- 
put of filter-tipped cigarettes, which re- 
quire less tobacco per cigarette than the 
regulars. 

(2) Cigarette advertising has been curtailed 
and restricted in several markets. 

(3) Cigarette taxes and import duties on to- 
bacco have been increased in several mar- 
kets. This has caused an increase in 
cigarette prices. 

(3) Consumption of smoking tobacco, cigars 
and cigarillos has increased in a number 
of markets. It is too early to determine 
whether or not these increases will be 
substained. 

(5) Efforts are being made in a number of 
countries to discourage cigarette smoking. 



10 




TOBACCO GOING TO WORLD MARKETS. 

Let's take a look at what is happening in cer- 
tain areas and countries around the world. For 
comparison purposes the world can be divided 
into three main groups, depending on their role 
in the Cold War. 

The first of these is the Communist Bloc, com- 
prising roughly a billion people or a third of the 
world's population. It is with the exception of 
Cuba, a geographically contiguous bloc of nations. 
It proposes to annihilate free government and 
free society wherever they exist and bring the 
whole human race under communist domination. 

In 1964 these countries produced about 780 
billion cigarettes accounting for about 31 percent 
of world output. 

Information available to us indicates that 
cigarette output and consumption have not been 
adversely affected by the smoking and health con- 
troversy in the Bloc countries. 

WILMINGTON DOCK SCENE— TOBACCO EXPORT. 




Because of political and economic problems the 
U. S. exported only 4 1 _> million pounds of tobacco 
to the Bloc countries in 1964. 

Recently administration officials indicated that 
steps would be taken to encourage more truth 
with the Bloc cotuttries in Eastern Europe. 

At present U. S. trade with Communist China, 
North Korea, North Vietnam and Cuba is banned. 
There will have to be a change in the political 
climate before trade could be resumed with these 
countries. 

The second group of nations consists of the 
less developed areas of the world, which are fre- 
quently referred to as developing countries. This 
group represents about one-half the population 
of the world, or roughly a billion and a half peo- 
ple. The annual per capita income in most of these 
countries is less than $100.00. 

In 1964 the developing nations produced about 
524 billion cigarettes, accounting for about 21 
percent of world output. Cigarette output in these 
countries during the past five years has increased 
at about 5 percent per year. 

The smoking and health issue has not adversely 
affected cigarette output and consumption in 
these countries. 

The U. S. exported about 90 million pounds of 
tobacco in 1964 to the developing countries. Be- 
cause of a shortage of dollars these countries 
have purchased a substantial part of their U. S. 
leaf requirements under provisions of Title I of 
P.L. 480 during the past few years. 

Together, the Bloc countries and developing 
countries account for about 83 percent of the 
world's population. However, they account for 
only about 52 percent of world cigarette output 
and provide an outlet for less than 20 percent of 
U. S. leaf moving into world trade. 

These nations, with their tremendous popula- 
tion, represent a vast potential market. I am sure 
that all of us hope that the serious economic and 
political problems which hamper trade with these 
areas can be resolved. For trade results in friends, 
and friendship results in peace. 

The third group of countries is composed of 
free industrialized nations, namely Western 
Europe, the United States and Ca>iada — as well 
as Japan, Australia and New Zealand. These na- 
tions represent only one-sixth of the world's peo- 
ple, but have an importance far out of proportion 
to their population and area. They control about 
two-thirds of the industrial capacity of the world. 

The free industrialized nations account for 
about 48 percent of world cigarette output and 
provide an outlet for about 80 percent of the U. S. 
leaf going overseas. Practically all of these sales 
are for dollars. 

It is in these nations where cigarette consump- 
tion per capita is highest and where the tobacco 
and health issue has caused serious problems. 



11 



The United Kingdom is the largest foreign 
market for U. S. tobacco, accounting for over 
'4. of all U. S. exports of tobacco and about 1/3 of 
U. S. flue-cured tobacco. 

The Royal College of Physicians' report and the 
Surgeon General's report received widespread 
publicity in the U. K. market. The Government 
has conducted a vigorous campaign to discourage 
smoking. Cigarette advertising on television has 
been banned and steps to further curtail advertis- 
ing may be undertaken. 

MOTOR CARRIERS BRING TOBACCO TO PORT. 







Other developments in the U. K. market related 
to the tobacco and health issue are the following : 

(1) Import duties on tobacco from non-Com- 
monwealth sources has been increased to 
$12.23 cents per pound. 

(2) The retail price of regular cigarettes has 
been increased to 76 cents per pack of 20 
and filter-tipped cigarettes to 69 cents. 

(3) There has been a rapid shift to production 
of filter-tipped cigarettes. Filter-tipped 
cigarettes accounted for about 16 percent 
of the total in 1960 and will likely account 
for 50-60 percent this year. 

Cigarette sales in the U. K. were about 113 
billion pieces in 1961 but dropped to about 110 
billion in 1962. Sales in 1963 were 115 billion 
pieces and in 1964 about 114 billion. 

These developments, combined with larger 
U. K. imports from Commonwealth sources, have 
adversely affected the usings of U. S. leafs. 

Usings of U. S. leaf dropped from about 154 
million pounds in 1960 to 136 million pounds in 
1964. It now appears that we have difficulty in 
maintaining our recent level of exports to that 
market. 

West Germany is the second largest market 
for U. S. tobacco. Last year about 77 million 
pounds of U. S. tobacco — mainly flue-cured and 
burley — were used in cigarette manufacture, 
compared with 70 million in 1963. 

Publicity concerning the smoking and health 
controversy did not stop an increase in cigarette 



smoking in 1964. West German consumption of 
cigarettes rose to a new record in 1964, and the 
per capita sales (for those 15 years and over) 
were 2,008 pieces vs. 1,905 pieces in 1963. 

West German output of cigarettes in 1964 
totaled 94 billion pieces, compared with 88 bil- 
lion in 1963, and the 1955-59 average of 58 bil- 
lion. In 1964, about 80 percent of total cigarette 
production consisted of filter-tipped brands. Early 
reports for 1965 indicate that cigarette output 
for the first half of 1965 shows a rise of about 8 
percent from the comparable period of 1964. 

The outlook seems favorable for an increase in 
demand for U. S. tobacco by German manufac- 
turers. 

Netherlands The impact of the publicity given 
to the Surgeon General's report on smoking and 
health was quite significant in the Netherlands. 
There has been an active campaign to discourage 
smoking. Cigarette consumption dipped 14 per- 
cent from the 1963 level, while sales of other 
products (except full-sized cigars) rose. However, 
there has been a sharp recovery in Dutch ciga- 
rette consumption this year, according to early in- 
formation. It is likely that sales for the full 
calendar year 1965 will approach the previous 
high of 1963. 

Growth in sales of filter-tipped brands has been 
slower than in most big importing countries. Thus 
this factor has not appreciably reduced the vol- 
ume of tobacco required to produce a given vol- 
ume of cigarettes, as in the cases of West Ger- 
many, the United Kingdom, and other countries. 

Japan is an excellent example of a firmly- 
established, growing market for U. S. cigarette 
leaf. Cigarette output in that country totaled 
some 161 billion pieces in 1964, compared with 
148 billion in 1963, and with an average of only 
102 billion in 1955-59. Most of the increased sales 
have consisted of brands containing substantial 
percentages of U. S. leaf. 

Immediately following the release of the U. S. 
Surgeon General's report on smoking and health 
in January 1964, there was a drop in cigarette 
consumption. It was of short duration, however, 
and sales of cigarettes in Japan last year were 
up some 6 percent from 1963. There appeared to 
be some increase, however, in demand for filter- 
tipped cigarettes, probably a result of the publici- 
ty regarding the health report. The Government 
of Japan does not have an active program to dis- 
courage smoking, however, the Monopoly has 
made some changes in their advertising program 
as a result of the tobacco and health issue. 

The big gain in cigarette consumption in Japan 
in recent years has been reflected in sharply in- 
creased use of U. S. tobacco. In 1955, only about 
5 million pounds of U. S. tobacco were processed 
in the factories of the Japan Monopoly Corpora- 
tion. During the next year Japan will likely pur- 
chase 35-40 million pounds of U. S. tobacco. 

Tobacco has been plagued by numerous prob- 
lems during the past few years. Most of you have 



12 



devoted much time and effort to helping resolve 
these problems. 

Perhaps in the period ahead more effort can 
be devoted to emphasizing the opportunities and 
favorable aspects of tobacco. Some of the favor- 
able factors that can be emphasized from a 
foreign trade standpoint are the following: 
Historical role. First shipment of tobacco to U. K. 
was the beginning of international trade in 
farm products. Our total exports of agricul- 
tural products now total over 6 billion 
annually. 
Quality. Adoption of the acreage-poundage pro- 
gram was a giant-step forward in improv- 
ing our quality". 

Foreign and domestic manufacturers are 
enthusiastic about the quality of the 1965 
crop. 

The improvement in the quality of the 
1965 flue-cured crop and the further im- 
provement expected in the years ahead will 
assure foreign manufacturers that they can 
depend upon the U. S. as an assured source 
of supply of high-quality leaf. 

Furthermore, under this program the 
U. S. should be able to further widen the 
gap between the quality of U. S. flue-cured 
leaf and that produced in competing coun- 
tries. 

Balance of Payments. Our exports of tobacco and 
tobacco products are valued at about $500 
million annually. Most of these sales are for 
dollars and make an important contribution 
to our balance of payments. 

Liberal trade policy. The U. S. has a liberal trade 
policy and encourages other nations to lib- 
eralize and encourage trade. 



At press time, this magazine learned, 2 Ports Authority 
people were honored by their peers. 

H. L. Weathers, Authority member, and Chairman 
of SPA P.R. Committee, who lives in Shelby, ac- 
cepted for the newspaper he publishes (Shelby Daily 
Star) the community service award of the N. C. 
Press Association in Chapel Hill, January 19. The 
award was presented by Governor Dan Moore during 
the annual Press Institute. 



Awards for Excellence in P.R. during- 1965 were 
presented at the January 17, meeting of the Raleigh 
Public Relations Society. The awards were Riven by 
the First Citizens Bank and will become an annual 
event. Lewis Holding-, President, made the presenta- 
tions and noted the new prominence being- placed 
on P.R. by successful management everywhere. Top 
winners were James Goodwin of Eastern Airlines, 
Raleigh, and Bernadette Hoyle, who won a third 
place also. She represents the N. C. Department of 
Welfare. Other awards went to David Murray of 
John Harden Associates, Raleigh, Nan Hutchens of 
Cameron Village Inc., L. C. Bruce, P. R. Director of 
N. C. State Ports Authority, Raleigh. 



Stable government and assured source of supply. 
The U. S. has a stable government and ade- 
quate supplies of all types of tobacco. Foreign 
importers can depend upon the U. S. as an 
assured source of supply of high quality 
tobacco. 
Source of Revenue. High quality tobacco prod- 
ucts are an important source of revenue in 
foreign countries. In many countries they 
are a major source of revenue. 
Export possibilities for U. S. tobacco and to- 
bacco products are good, and we see possibilities 
for growth in the period ahead. 

The fundamental world situation favors export 
expansion. Populations continue to increase rapid- 
ly. Increased prosperity, a natural result of eco- 
nomic growth, has brought stepped-up demand 
for high quality tobacco products, better foods 
and consumer goods. It is the policy of the USDA 
to develop foreign markets for our agricultural 
products — to take advantage of the inherently 
favorable world situation. 

Your organization can play an important role 
in helping expand export trade. 



HOGSHEADS OF BRIGHT LEAF GO OVER SIDE. 





WALTER FRIEDERICHS 



WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses of 396,000 
square feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL: Customs Appraisal Service pro- 
vided in modern appraiser warehouse at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water (being deepened to 38 
feet) , and supported by tank farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds with 266,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
with sprinkler and deluge systems (new 120,000 sq. ft. 
shed under construction). 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Ten acres paved open storage, acces- 
sible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
truck and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 3,205 feet long with a 46-foot apron. Capacity — seven 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water (being deep- 
ened to 38 feet) . 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnet 
work and 2-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomo- 
tive crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




\ 



80 



*EIL 




Wil 



H. A. Schmidt 
)Ort Manager 




SOUTHPORT is easily ac 
Wilmington, North Carolit^ 
133, and 211 or 87 from Ui 



A Facility of 
forth Carolina State Poi 

fo^m p - °- b ° x 578 

Southport, N. C. 28461 
Area 919-457-2621 



i 



CHARLES McNEILL 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



-<f - ■'- 



WHARF : Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth of 35 feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 100,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
and one of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses, totaling 
456,000 square feet, with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
— Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on ter- 
minal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length of rear of transit sheds and warehouses. South- 
ern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to Port 
property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization 
cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 



LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
also easy level access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cy- 
anide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 
chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern— A&EC Railway 
System and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad and num- 
erous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




Ports Authority Develops Waterside Industry 
In Northeastern North Carolina 




In 1941 the U. S. Government purchased eight 
hundred twenty-one acres of land on the shores 
of the Pasquotank River in northeastern North 
Carolina near Elizabeth City. 

Subsequently, an anti-submarine patrol base 
was established here at a cost of fourteen and 
one-half million dollars. The U. S. Navy continued 
to operate the base during the war years with 
a complement of about two thousand personnel, 
but after the war, as "Lighter-Than-Air" craft 
became obsolete, the huge hangars, each contain- 
ing about three hundred twenty thousand square 
feet of floor space and ceiling heights of two 
hundred feet, became more and more of a liabil- 
ity to the property. 

By 1960 the base had become obsolete except 
for possible use by large seaplanes or large naval 
"Heavier-Than-Air" craft. And so at a cost of 
about one million dollars to the U. S. Navy, the 
base was reactivated as a seaplane modification 
center, and the State of North Carolina was per- 
suaded to build an access ramp to the river to 
provide for the launching and beaching of air- 
craft. 

The practice of building access roads to indus- 
trial sites is a common practice in the Commerce 
& Industry Division of the Department of Con- 
servation & Development, with the acquiescence 
and cooperation of the Highway Commission. The 
property then belonged to the US Navy, and 
the access ramp became a part of the property. 

A contract was awarded to the Hayes Aircraft 
Corporation, in 1961 which subsequently devel- 
oped an industry there with payrolls totalling 
eight million dollars and employment of eight 
hundred people through mid-year 1964. 

This eight million dollar payroll in northeastern 
North Carolina was made possible by the co- 



operation of the State of North Carolina with the 
U. S. Navy, and resulted in the five-county area 
changing from depressed to self-supporting in 
economics. 

Finally, in 1964 the U. S. Navy declared the 
land surplus and offered it to the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Health, Education & Welfare or the U. S. 
Department of Labor. Local officials of the area, 
wanting to retain an industry on the site rather 
than establishing a federal institution of doubt- 
ful future, came to the Ports Authority for assist- 
ance. 

Through efforts of the late Congressman Herb- 
ert Bonner and with the assistance of Senators 
Sam Ervin and Everett Jordan, and wholehearted 
cooperation of state agencies and departments 
that might have been in line for a slicing up of 
this property, the Ports Authority was named as 
bargaining agent to secure the property from the 
U. S. General Services Administration. 

A fair appraisal of the property was made by 
GSA, and the Ports Authority was allowed to 
purchase eight hundred twelve acres, including 
the entire site and the railroad spur line, for four 
hundred twenty-five thousand dollars on a long 
term basis. Cash down payment involved was 
forty-two thousand five hundred dollars. Title 
was passed in January, 1965 and physical oc- 
cupancy of the base, with a maintenance force of 
six men, took place in August, 1965. 

The Ports Authority asked Governor Dan 
Moore and the Council of State to approve an 
option to the I-XL Corporation of Goshen, Indi- 
ana for the entire tract, based on proposals by 
them to install an industry using water, rail 
and highway transportation. The approval was 
granted. In November Westinghouse Electric 
Corporation of Pittsburgh announced the pur- 
chase of the I-XL Corporation, and on December 
16th Governor Dan Moore announced the execu- 
tion of the option to purchase the land by the 
Westinghouse Corporation. 

On January 1st, twelve carloads of machinery 
arrived in Elizabeth City, and by early summer 
the I-XL Division of Westinghouse will be manu- 
facturing kitchen cabinets and other wood prod- 
ucts on this industrial site. 

The purchase price from the Ports Authority 
was five hundred thousand dollars, gross profit, 
$75,000.00 before deduction of expenses for six 
months of operation, and one year's ownership. 

The purchaser has assured the community of 
an industry employing at least four hundred fifty 
people. There are indications of plans that may 



16 



lead to an industrial complex in the 
area. The railroad will be activated, 
causing an increase in tonnage for the 
Norfolk-Southern Railroad in an area 
where railroad tonnages have de- 
creased, motor carrier transportation 
volume will double, and the inland 
waterway will see a marked increase 
in traffic if present plans are brought 
to fruition. 

Once again the N. C. State Ports 
Authority was able to fulfill its purpose 
as stated in its charter; to do anything 
and everything reasonable to promote 
commerce on the inland waters, harbors 
and seaports of North Carolina." 







MARCH 24 & 25, 1966 

Regional Export Expansion 
Council To Sponsor Export 
Sales Workshop 

U. N. C. at Charlotte will host second of a series 
of these workshops. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




Mo/-eAe*<£ C/ty 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

G. D. Zealand, Executive Director 

Drawer B 919-728-4527 

Beaufort, N. C. Courthouse Annex 



Topics to be Studied 

"How To" Aspects of Export Sales 

Export Market Research 

Indirect Export Sales Methods 

Direct Export Sales Methods 

Export-Import Bank Program 

Marine Insurance 

Ocean Freight Service 

Air Freight Services 

Documentation 

Export Credit Regulations 

Applications may be made to Export workshop REEC 
P. 0. Box 1950, Greensboro, North Carolina 

Reg. Fee Including Meals and Instructional Material 
$30.00 

Registration limited to 40 persons — 



oWo/ttk Cd/toftna Skipping Co. 



STEAMSHIP & FORWARDING AGENTS 

STEVEDORES 
MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



TWX: 919-255-2925 
Phone: 919-726-6173 
P. O. Box 650 



F.M.C. License rrl079 
Cable Address 
"Dovics" 



17 






r * 




m^^m 



W 153 




Departure - 
N.C.S.P.A. 
Destination - 
Fort Macon 



USCG SHIP CHILULA. 

The day you officially departed from our docks was a nostalgic one for Morehead State Port Terminal. 

During the past several years there have been many times your ship was asked to move to another 
berth or to coordinate your operation in some way with activity at this terminal. We are also sure 
there have been many times when you or your predecessors have "bent over backwards" to carry out 
such requests. 

We would like, at this time, to let you know we have sincerely appreciated this spirit of cooperation 
and your understanding of the problems in our growing port. During time of stress and crises presence 
of the Chilula has been most reassuring and, as the records show, completely in control of whatever the 
situation demanded. 

I sincerely hope you find your new berth adequate and operationally "comfortable". Call on us if 
we can assist you in any way and extend our thanks to the officers and crew of the Chilula for their 
cooperation through the years. 
Letter to Commander of the Chilula from 
C. R. McNeill, Operations Manager 
State Port Terminal 

South Atlantic & Caribbean Ports Association 



Meeting of the South Atlantic & Caribbean 
Ports Association was held in Jacksonville, Fla., 
on November 8. Appearing in the photo from 
left to right, J. W. Davis, NCSPA, W. Thomas 
Rice, president of Atlantic Coast Line who was 
guest speaker at the luncheon, Raymond W. Gage, 



general manager of Jacksonville Port Authority 
and Edwin H. Fletcher, vice chairman of Jack- 
sonville Port Authority, Jacksonville, Fla. Davis 
is president of the Association and Gage is first 
vice president. Fletcher introduced Rice. 




EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 

U. 8. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
Edward L. Mercaldo 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



For Increased Sales and Profits 



Hosse, Barmenmusterkartenfabrik, 49 Alte Landstr. 
Radevormwald. 



Fruit, Tree Nut, Vegetable Farms 

Belgium — All types of good quality apples. Agro- 
fruit Compagnie Belgium P.V.B.A., 167 Italielei, An- 
twerp, Belgium. 



Household Furniture 

Germany — Garden furniture; children's furniture. 
Erbacher, Heinrich Hammer K. G., 7904 Erbach 
Wuerttemberg, Postfach 20, Germany. 



Canning, Preserving Foods 

Australia — Frozen vegetables and fish. Sunkist Snap 
Frozen Distributors Pty. Ltd. 50 Nott St., Port Mel- 
bourne, Victoria. 

Peru — Canned and preserved foods of all kinds. Re- 
quests replies in Spanish. Organizadora y Adminis- 
tradora de Mercados S.A., Dos de Mayo 820, Tacna. 



Industrial Chemicals 

Philippines — Reagent chemicals. Lee Peng Tuan, 
Manager, Edwardson's Experimental Supply, Rm. R, 
2nd Floor, 924 O'Donnell, Box 2387, Manila, the 
Philippines. 

Sweden — Industrial chemicals all kinds; Kemi-In- 
tressen AB, Jakobstorg 3, Stockholm. 



Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

Australia — Cotton piece goods, 36" and 48", suitable 
for window curtains. Imfine Furnishing Co. Pty. Ltd., 
44 Sydenham Rd., Marrickville, N.S.W., Australia. 



Floor Covering Mills 

Austria — Broadloom carpeting; scatter rugs. Heim- 
tex-Weberei Maly & Co., Mariahilferstrasse 106, 
Vienna 7, Austria. 



Yarn, Thread Mills 

Sweden — Synthetic yarns for manufacturing cur- 
tains, draperies; spun nylon yarn for manufacturing 
furniture textiles. AB Marks Jacquardvaveri, Bjorke- 
torp. 

Men's, Youths, Boys' Furnishings 

Netherlands Antilles — High Quality work clothing. 
Oranjestad Agencies, 19 Fahrenheitstraat, Oranjestad, 
Aruba. 

Fabricated Textile Products 

Germany — Draperies, cotton, linen or synthetic; cif 
European ports; requests replies in German. H. Georg 



Metalworking Machinery 

Finland — Machine tools. Requests full details, 
prices, terms. Suomen Koneliike Oy, Vattuniemenkatu 
27, Helsinki 20. 

Germany — Machine tools for metalworking indus- 
try, including metalworking tools. Emil Wolf, Inh. R. 
Kassberger, Werkzeuge-Maschinen-Kugellager, 73 
Esslingen Neckar, Ebershaldenstrasse 33, Germany. 

Farm Machinery 

Iran — Agricultural tractors. Machine Rah Co., Ltd. 
1619 Ghazvin Ave., Serah Azari, Tehran, Iran. 

Construction, Mining, Materials Handling 
Machinery, Equipment 

Hong Kong — Crawler cranes, shovels, draglines. 
Blair & Co., Ltd., Union House. 

Engineering, Laboratory, Scientific, Research 
Instruments 

Malaysia — Laboratory, scientific instruments and 
equipment, all kinds, for use in schools and colleges. 
The Anglo-Thai Corp. Ltd., Lee Rubber Bldg.. Kuala 
Lumpur. 



19 




NORTH CAROLINA 

WORLD TRADE ASSOCIATION, INC. 

205 SOUTH CHURCH STREET. ROOM 301 

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA 28202 




RUFFIN 



The North Carolina World Trade Association was the outgrowth of a continuing effort of the Regional 
Export Expansion Council to persuade the industrial and commercial firms of North Carolina to come together 
for a common purpose, or purposes, in the promotion of world trade. 

The World Trade Association was formed in 1964, and Charles Harris of Charlotte was elected presi- 
dent. There are now 200 members, representing firms from all over the state. For example: manufacturers of 
cigarette paper and wood products from the mountains; textile, cigarette and furniture manufacturers from 
the piedmont; hardware distributors textile machinery manufactures, heavy equipment manufacturers; dry 
goods merchants, tobacco dealers and chemical importers from the coastal plains. 

The North Carolina State Ports Authority has long had an interest in this organization, and part of the 
services furnished to North Carolina industry by the Ports Authority is to keep in contact with this and other 
similar associations for information and exchange of ideas. 

Recently, Peter Brown Ruffin of Wilmington was elected president, and an important drive was begun to 
bring the membership up to 500 hundred. 

If you are in World Trade in North Carolina, or if you propose to become a part of the "Billion Dollar 
World Trade Picture" of North Carolina, it would be helpful to you to contact the World Trade Association 
at the above address. 

World Trade in North Carolina has increased since 1961 more than 60 million annually to a billion 
dollars in 1964 and well over a billion in 1965. A steady increase in volume is being maintained. Sixty-eight 
firms have made their first export since January 1, 1965 and over one hundred eighty firms have made their 
first export sales from North Carolina in the past three years. 

For further information contact this magazine; Joel New, U. S. Dept. of Commerce of Greensboro; Ed 
Mercaldo, Dept. of Conservation & Development, Raleigh, or the North Carolina World Trade Association. 




Export Coordinator 
Appointed By C&D 



The appointment of Edward L. Mercaldo, an official of Wachovia Bank and Trust Co., Winston- 
Salem, as exports coordinator for the State Department of Conservation and Development was an- 
nounced recently. 

With Wachovia since 1963, Mercaldo was employed in the bank's International Department, where 
his responsibilities included day to day operations of the unit, foreign exchange and acceptance trading, 
letter of credit operations, credit analysis, and supervision of the collection department. 

Mercaldo, who succeeds E. Bruce Peabody, is a graduate of Georgetown University's Edmund A. 
Walsh School of Foreign Service. 

C&D Director Dan E. Stewart said Mercaldo's employment "is another indication of the progressive 
steps being taken to strengthen our Division of Commerce and Industry." 

The Exports Coordinator in C&D resulted from efforts of the REEC, the State Ports Authority and 
interested industries, led by the U. S. Dept. of Commerce Greensboro office to have a central communi- 
cations and coordinator office in Raleigh, to promote export trade in North Carolina industry. 



20 



North 
Carolina 

Our state's getting to be a big name in international trade, 
and it takes a big bank to keep up. A bank big enough and 
experienced enough to offer North Carolina business and 
industry direct banking and commercial connections 
throughout the world. Backed by total resources of more 
than $825 million and capital funds over $55 million, 
NCNB's International Department serves exporters and 
importers through letters of credit, acceptance financing, 
foreign collections, foreign exchange and remittance of 
funds. Whatever it takes, we're doing our best to meet the 
demands of this fast-moving state. And well we should. 
After all, it's part of our name. 

National 
Bank 

Offices in Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point. North Wilkesboro. Raleigh, Research Triangle. Statesville. Tarboro. Tryon, Wilmington and Winston Salem 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island -Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



22 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 



W. D. WILLIAMS 

Vice-President 



WADE H. PIERCE 

Secretary 



W. P. EMERSON 

Exec. Vice-President 



J. P. WIL80N 

Treasurer 



LEMUEL L. DOS8. JR. 
Trnffic Manager 



Wilmington Shipping Go. 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores 

LICENSED CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 



N. C. Maritime Bldg. 

State Port Terminal 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Telephone 763-7333 WILSHIPOO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 



Federal Maritime Board Freight Forwarder 
Registration No. 367 

F.M.C. Forwarder Application No 469 








N 



AT ITS BEST : 



New Hanover County, N. C. 



Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 

Wilmington, North Carolina 





I \ 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Plocc 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 



Agent: Morchcad City ond Wilmington, N. C 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



23 



&Jtop, 




&"m 



JIRST- 
CITIZENS 

BANK J TRUST 
COMPANY 




^1 



** 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



7865 



707 
Years - 1966 
Now 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondelet Building 

JAckson 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SArotogo 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 

WHItehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 4il 



24 



F.M.C No 496 



The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 



1211 McColl Street 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. Box 93 

AUndo Station 

Charlotte. N. C. 28286 



Norfolk-Newport News. Va 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond, Va. 
Tra»elers Bldo 



Alexandria. Va. 
P 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc 



F.M.B. No. 2454 
APPLICATION NO. 70 

waters shipping co. 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Mo re head Citg 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 
CUSTOMS BROKER 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C, Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADOUAITERS. TRUCKING SUUDING. IAIEICH 



Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Processors 



Color Black & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



ED BROWNING 



Phone RO 36263 
119 Market Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO, 2-4232 
Water & Market St.. 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC 



International 

Freight Forwarders 
F. M. B. No. 223 

F. M. C. No. 69 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 
STEVEDORES 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 763-8271 
AND 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

TELEPHONE 726-3080 



RICHARD BARKER 

President 

MERLE TEACHEY 

Traffic Manager 



MANAGER 



MOREHEAD CITY 



R. H. FUTCHS 
Gen. Mgr. 
E. MAYO HOLMES 
Sec. & Trcos. 

JACK TILLEY 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



BULK RATE 
U. S. Poiioj. 

PAID 

Raleigh. N. C. 
P.rmll No. 32 



In the 
Spirit of 1869 




The integrity, imagination and dependable performance of Heide 
Company, Inc. today is in the same spirited "do-it-well" credo that 
has prevailed since the Company was founded 97 years ago. 
These traditional qualities are blended with the most modern 
methods and equipment to provide complete agency, stevedoring 
and related services in the two great North Carolina Ports of 
Wilmington and Morehead City. 

We are proud and privileged to be partners of the North Carolina 
State Ports Authority in their dynamic growth. 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC 

Founded 1869 

A LIJCKENBACH Company 
WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • Forwarding Agents • Stevedores 






North Carolina State Library 



Raleiqh 

5TBTE POITS 






Sprint, 1964 




' ' ^I Hlfr l lfl fr 








North 
Carolina 

Our state's getting to be a big name in international trade, 
and it takes a big bank to keep up. A bank big enough and 
experienced enough to offer North Carolina business and 
industry direct banking and commercial connections 
throughout the world. Backed by total resources of more 
than $825 million and capital funds over $55 million, 
NCNB's International Department serves exporters and 
importers through letters of credit, acceptance financing, 
foreign collections, foreign exchange and remittance of 
funds. Whatever it takes, we're doing our best to meet the 
demands of this fast-moving state. And well we should. 
After all, it's part of our name. 

National 
Bank 

Offices in Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Research Triangle, Statesville, Tarboro, Tryon, Wilmington and Winston-Salem 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines _ 23 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 22 

Colorcraft Studios ... Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County .— 15 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. ... —24 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 24 

Glasgow Hicks Co. 23 

Heide Company, Inc. - Luckenbach Back Cover 

Heide Company, Inc. Inside Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. _... - Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line „ - -22 

Morehead City Shipping Co. 24 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. ... 22 

New Hanover County _ _ 23 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. „ Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co. - - —15 

North Carolina National Bank Inside Front Cover 

Southern Railway System _ 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co —19 

Walker Taylor Insurance — 1 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc. _ 22 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 23 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc. 1 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 




Southern doesn't stop when the sun goes 
down. We go 24 hours a day, 365 days 
a year. That means when you ship via 
Southern your freight keeps moving. It's 
a wise thing to remember. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



101 

1865 - Years 
Now 



1966 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 

PArtt 6-3300 

New Orleoni 12, La. 

CarondoUt Building 
JAckien 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercontilc Trust Building 
SArotooa 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 

109 W. Main Sfroot 
Phon. 625-4312 



New York 4, N. Y. 

33 South William Stroot 

WHif.hoil 4-9120 

F.M.C. Lien,. No. 411 




FINN-ENSO ON HER MAIDEN VOYAGE TO WILMINGTON 



Maiden Voyage 
of the FINN-ENSO 



This sterling wine cooler was presented to the M/S Finn-Enso 
by the N. C. State Ports Authority and the City of Wilming- 
ton on the occasion of her maiden voyage to Wilmington, 
January 24, 1966. 





KAUNO ARMAS LEHTO, VICE CONSUL FOR FINLAND; CAPTAIN NILO NYKANEN OF THE FINN-ENSO, O. 0. ALLS- 
BROOK. MAYOR OF WILMINGTON AND R. A. DE VANE, COMPTROLLER OF THE N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 
JOHN M. REEVES. Chairman, Pinehurst 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
WILLIAM B. GLENN, Greenville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS. Fayetteville 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 
HENRY LEE WEATHERS, shclln 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STRTE PORTS 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce ir Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

HUGH HARDAWAY, Engineer 



SPRING ISSUE, 196(3, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 12, NO. 1 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drvv. 648-28557 

Telephone PArk 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON. Tobacco Supt. ' 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal— Operations 
P. O. Box 3037-28403 
Tel. 919 ROger 3- 1 62 1 

TWX 919 762-5661 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 
H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 
Telephone 919-457-2621 
P, O. Box 578-28461 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Maiden Voyage of Finn-Enso 2 

Need : East-West Highways 4 

Address by John T. Conner 6 

Carolina Salt 8 

Containerization is Here 9 

Trucks Bring You Better Living 9 

Wilmington "All- America City" 10 

Ports Authority Bows Out in Pasquotank 11 

Down The Historyland Trail 12 

World Trade Association 16 

N. C. Furniture Sold in Europe 17 

COVER STORY 



STATE PORTS 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 




This cover of the State Ports Magazine 
shows the Morehead City Port Terminal, 
looking west, with a beautiful view of 
Marsh Island in the center background. 

Marsh Island will be the location of the 
new bulk handling facility, funds for which 
were announced recently by Congressman 
David Henderson and Senator Everett 
Jordan. 

This spectacular aerial photograph by 
Bob Simpson caught a merchant vessel 
passing through Beaufort Inlet inbound. 
332 of these vessels called at Morehead 
City State Port Terminal during the year 
1965. There will be an estimated twice 
this many vessels using the port in 1968 
due to the new facilities now being built. 
(See Page 15) 



Need East- West Highways-Governor Says 

Ports 
Authority 

Says 
We Agree 





REEVES 



GOVERNOR OF XOETH CAROLINA 



Committee Presents Plan for 
Highway System 

In February. John M. Reeves. Chairman, said at the Ports Authority — 

Meeting. "The most important thing to the welfare of the state and the 
Ports Authority is an up-to-date, modern highway system, tying the state 
together in an east-west direction. I want to appoint a committee to push 
for this highway network, composed of George Purvis of Fayetteville. 
Chairman: W. B. Glenn of Greenville; H. L. Weathers of Shelby, and F. H. 
Ross. Jr.. of Charlotte. This committee will please do anything and every- 
thing possible to encourage the immediate construction of a better high- 
way system leading to the ports. The committee will operate through the 
Public Relations Office in Raleigh.*' 

This committee appeared before the Highway Commission the last week 
in February and presented a proposal as outlined by these maps. A series 
of speaking engagements has been set up by the Public Relations Office on 
a statewide basis. In addition, there have been television shows and radio 
spots covering a wide area. 




PURVIS 



J 



•^ 





WEATHERS 



ROSS 



GLEXX 



, 





TWO LANE EXISTING ROADS 
US 6/ 70. 7+, 17 and +2! *<h,<.h 
feed /nta-stat* system „,6o porti 





ADDRESS BY SECRETARY OF COMMERCE 
JOHN T. CONNOR. DELIVERED BEFORE THE 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE, RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA, 
7:00 P.M., THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 1966 




L. TO R. NED HUFFMAN, EXEC. V. P. RESEARCH TRIANGLE, INC. 
FORMER SECY. OF COMMERCE LUTHER H. HODGES, CHM. RESEARCH 
TRIANGLE INSTITUTE U. S. SECRETARY OF COMMERCE— JOHN CON- 
NER. 



I am delighted to be here tonight in the state 
where American history began, and where so 
many proud and stirring chapters of that history 
have been lived through the years. 

Today, you North Carolinians have achieved 
widely recognized distinction and leadership in 
many areas of our national life. As a prominent 
publisher and educator has written, North Caro- 
lina "today ranks as one of the leaders not only 
of the South, but of the nation, in statecraft, 
in industry, and in education." 

Nor is there a state in the union with brighter 
potentials for future growth and development. 
Governor Dan Moore said recently, "Never before 
in our history have the opportunities been so 
obvious or so abundant." In this I wholeheartedly 
concur. 

The facts about North Carolina — past, present, 
and future — speak for themselves. I must admit, 
however, that I do look at your world through 
Hodges-colored glasses. 



In five years the Gross National Product of the 
United States, the value of all our goods and 
services, has increased by nearly $200 billion to 
an annual rate of $697 billion at the end of 1965. 
The increase alone is more than equivalent to the 
Nation's total GNP in 1943. 

North Carolina can tell the national story from 
its own experience. 

Personal income in your State rose from $7.6 
billion in 1961 to $9.3 billion in 1964 — an increase 
of 22 percent, or 4 percent above the national 
average for this thriving nation. Per capita 
income rose at a corresponding rate — 5 percent- 
age points above the national average. Final 
figures for 1965 are not yet in, but it is clear that 
they represent a continued surge. 

More people are at work in North Carolina than 
ever before — nearly 2 million last year in a popu- 
lation of some 5 million. Unemployment in North 
Carolina, at 4.2 percent, was below the national 
average of 4.6 percent for the year. 

No one is more aware than you that North 
Carolina leads all other states in the manufacture 



of textiles, tobacco products, furniture and bricks. 

North Carolina businessmen are alert to market 
opportunities abroad as well as at home. Your 
state ranks close to the top in total exports. North 
Carolina is currently selling an estimated $800 
million worth of goods overseas each year. You 
lead the Nation in the export of tobacco and 
textile mill products. 

Just last week in Washington, Governor Hodges 
joined me in presenting Presidential "E" Awards 
for export excellence to 12 companies and organi- 
zations which made significant contributions to 
the balance of payments and to growth in the 
national economy by expanding foreign markets. 

The "E" is a familiar symbol in North Carolina. 
Your State Department of Conservation and De- 
velopment was the first state agency in the 
country to receive the "E" Award, and 10 "E" 
flags now fly in North Carolina. 

There has been no finer example of the active 
acceptance of joint economic responsibility than 
the President's voluntary balance of payments 
program. Under this program, the payments 
deficit was cut in half last year through the de- 
termined efforts of the nation's business and 
banking communities, and the voluntary effort 
is expected to yield further major contributions 
toward balancing the nation's international books 
this year. 

In each of these areas, the Department of Com- 
merce has a prime responsibility in the federal 
government. And they are also areas of special 
interest to you business leaders here in North 
Carolina. 

The Public Works and Development Act passed 
by Congress last year marks a new step forward 
in the economic development of this country. It 
provides for an expanded program of Federal, 
technical and financial assistance to areas of high 
unemployment or low family income, administered 
by the Economic Development Administration of 
the Department of Commerce. 



Financial assistance is provided under this 
program only on the basis of a sound development 



J 



plan established by the locality, state, or region. 
North Carolina and her counties have responded 
in the best possible fashion with plans for creating 
new jobs and industrial opportunities. 

Several of the most promising initial projects 
in the nation are based in North Carolina. A $9.5 
million public works loan to the State Ports Au- 
thority to expand the port at Morehead City will 
make it possible to export at least a million tons 
of phosphate a year from the new mining oper- 
ations in Beaufort and Hyde counties. A study of 
the ultimate potential indicates port development 
could set off a new chain of economic progress — 
including up to 50 new plants with a combined 
investment of nearly $100 million and an employ- 
ment capacity of more than 3,000. 



Across the entire land there is no more excit- 
ing venture than the Research Triangle within 
the perimeter of your great universities. You 
are transforming a tract of pineland into an 
intellectual, scientific, and technological resource 
of the first magnitude. 

The North Carolina Research Triangle is ce- 
menting a relationship between industry and uni- 
versity that will yield dividends to every element 
of society. The universities are now better 
equipped to produce the industrial leaders of 
tomorrow because the facilities and students are 
more conversant with the problems and oppor- 
tunities of industry. And industry now stands at 
an open doorway to the knowledge and skills that 
are cultivated in the universities' research labora- 
tories. 

This Triangle represents the kind of building 
for the future that has been the key to progress 
throughout the history of this state and this 
broad nation. 



In this state where the four T's of textile, 
tobacco, tourism, and timber products are among 
your economic mainstays, another advance under 
the fifth T of technology can make an additional 
important contribution. The technology of the 
space age is bringing dramatic changes to weather 
forecasting an art that is now well on the way 
to becoming a science. 



The importance of this development to your 
beautiful state — with its world-famous coastline — 
cannot be exaggerated either in terms of life and 
property, or in terms of the annual income of 
your large and growing tourist industry. 

The rate at which you are building roads in 
this state is another boost for your important 
tourist industry, as well as for all of your own 
citizens and for all of your business activities. 

Well over half of North Carolina's 770 miles 
in the Interstate system are open to traffic. North 
Carolina's highways already are among the best 
in the Nation, and approval of the $300 million 
roads bond issue last year indicates you are de- 
termined to keep this the case. 




BULK HANDLING FACILITY AS PROJECTED 

The Federal Government also maintains a 
strong interest in the continuing improvement 
of North Carolina's highway system. The Bureau 
of Public Roads' apportionment for fiscal year 
1967, beginning July 1, totals almost $50.5 mil- 
lion, of which $27 million is for Interstate mileage 
and the balance for other Federal-aid projects. 

An important aspect of this current program — 
and one that has received broadly enthusiastic 
response — is beautification of the nation's high- 
ways. Opinions differ in some of the specifics of 
this program, of course, and many considerations 
and interests are involved in various parts of the 
country. Now underway is the process of develop- 
ing roadside standards that are equitable and 
reasonable both from the standpoint of the public 
interest and private interests concerned so that 
Americans can, in the President's words, "touch 
nature and see beauty" as they drive through 
their countryside. 

The economic road ahead for North Carolina is 
as broad and exciting to contemplate as the great 
new highways that make vacation-time Tarheels 
of millions of Americans each year. The economic 
superhighway that leads from your proud "vale 
of humility" to even brighter horizons is paved 
with many of the components of your present-day 
prosperity. 

Diversification is one key word, both in agricul- 
ture and industry. This is an old story for North 
Carolina, and one in which you have achieved 
considerable success in the past. Along with this 
diversification will go further increased emphasis 
on export expansion — of agricultural products, 
furniture, textiles, minerals, and other products 
of your farms and factories. 

And I am sure that pioneering education and 
training programs that you have sponsored here 
in North Carolina — and which have played such 
an important role in your past progress — will 
go forward to new and even greater heights of 
achievement. In short, with the continued en- 
lightened efforts of leaders like yourselves, I feel 
safe in predicting that the horn of plenty in your 
North Carolina state seal will continue to over- 
flow in the years ahead — from your mountains to 
your Piedmont to your ocean white with foam. 

There is no goal you cannot attain. 



500 TONS PER HOUR LOADING 




*u 



GRAHAM KERR. PURCHASING- AGENT, LOOKS AT NEW 6 
YARD BUCKETS, RECENT ACQUISITION AT WILMINGTON. 




SALT POURS INTO HOPPER EN ROUTE TO CAROLINA SALT 
COMPANY'S NEARBY DEPOT. 




CH --" 



' 




6-YARD BUCKET OPERATING UNLOADING SALT FROM HOLD 
OF VESSEL. 



CAROLINA SALT COMPANY— a private firm 
operating on a lease at Wilmington State Port 
Terminal, uses one of the 6-yard buckets added 
to the gantry cranes. Each crane is equipped with 
this new bucket and can handle bulk similar to 
this cargo at a rate of 500 tons per hour, accord- 
ing to Manager Walter Friederichs. 



GIANT GANTRY DEPOSITS SALT FOR TRUCK LOADING. 




Containerization Is Here - Wilmington Is Ready 




NEW WHARF EXTENSION AT WILMINGTON— OPEN BERTH FOR CONTAINERS— NEW 120.000 SQ. FT. TRANSIT SHED- 
RIGHT FOREGROUND— CONTAINER TERMINAL CENTER. 

TRUCKS BRING YOU BETTER LIVING 



RALEIGH, N. C. (Special)— "There are more 
"long-line" inter-state motor carriers with home 
offices in North Carolina than any other state in 
the nation," according to J. T. Outlaw, Exec. V. 
Pres., North Carolina Motor Carriers Association. 




Trucks move most everything you eat, use, 
wear, and sell with 575 authorized motor truck 
freight carriers and 60 contract carriers. North 
Carolina leads the Nation in the number of long- 
line interstate domiciled motor freight carriers. 

"They induce national companies to build and 
locate here, providing useful and accurate trans- 



portation for all industries whenever and wher- 
ever needed." 

Outlaw pointed out that there is also "a tre- 
mendous fleet of individually-owned trucking com- 
panies operate within our State . . . developing 
more business and trade for the local communi- 
ties." 

"Truck wheels never cease to roll in every part 
of North Carolina. Industry needs only to pick 
the spot to locate and trucks will be there to 
bring the raw materials and deliver the finished 
products. Residents of more than 200 Tarheel 
communities depend entirely on trucks for every- 
thing they eat, wear, use and sell," Outlaw stated. 

"The North Carolina Motor Carriers Associa- 
tion, with more than 9,000 members has the larg- 
est membership of any state trucking association 
in the Nation. They are always ready to furnish 
new and modern truck transportation whenever 
and wherever needed in the 100 counties of North 
Carolina," he reminded. 

"The true importance of highways and motor 
transportation in the industrial development of 
our state becomes even more apparent when one 
realizes that North Carolina has the largest state 
highway system with more miles of highways 
(71,845) under state jurisdiction than any other 
state in the Nation," Outlaw concluded. 



WILMINGTON DECLARED 
ALL - AMERICA CITY 




Wilmington Star (reprint) 

THE MAN WHO UNFOLDED HIS CITY'S STORY BEFORE THE EYES OF THE NATION 
Dan D. Cameron As He Delivered Wilmington's Presentation To The All-America Cities Jury 

Presentation Of Case 
Was Work Of Many... 



By LYNDAL WARREN 

Staff Writer 

Wilmington's steady climb to 
All-America City fame began 
many years ago, but this na- 
tional recognition would not 
have come to the city if it had 
not been for the pride, confi- 
dence and old-fashioned hard 
work exhibited by one group of 
men. 

The people of Wilmington 
molded their community into 
All - America City material; 
members of the Greater Wil- 
mington Chamber of Commerce 
undertook the task of placing 
this material before the eyes of 
the nation. 

Preparations for Wilmington's 
strong bid as an All-America 
City began almost a year ago 
when Dan D. Cameron was 
named chairman of the Cham- 
ber's All-America City Com- 
mittee. 

Of vital assistance to Cam- 
eron in compiling Wllming 



ton's application were How- 
ard A. F enton Jr., then Cham- 
ber president; and H. Van 
Reid, Chamber executive vice 
president, as well as commit- 
lee members Rye B. Page, 
Leslie N. Boney, Join Fox 



and Henry J. MacMillan. 
The fruition of these intial 
efforts was realized last Octo- 
ber with the announcement that 
Wilmington had been selected 
from among 142 entrants in the 
All- America City competition as 



Port City 7th 
N. C. Winner 

Wilmington is the seventh 
North Carolina city to win the 
All-American City title during 
the 16 years of the national 
competition. 

It is also the second city east 
of Raleigh to gain the outstand- 
ing honor. 

According to a report by Miss 
Jane Douglas, Coordinator of 
Civic Programs of Look Naga- 
zine, North Carolina has been 
in a real winning streak during 
the past few years. It places 
fifth among states with a large 



number of winners over the 
years — led only by Illinois, Ohio, 
California and Missouri, in that 
order. 

One North Carolina city — 
Winston-Salem — has won twice. 
The first time was in 1959 and 
the second in 1964. 

The Tar Heel state's record 
follows : 

1965— Wilmington. 

1964— Winston-Salem. 

1963— Gastonia. 

1962— High Point. 

1961— Salisbury. 

1959 — Winston-Salem. 

1966 — Laurinburg. 

1951 — Asheville-Buncombe 
County. 

Charlotte received Honorable 
Mentions in 1964 and 1957, as 
did Mooresville in 1960. 



one of tbo 24 finalists. 

Then the difficult task of put- 
ting together Wilmington's pre- 
sentation began. 

Members of all news media 
cooperated in promoting the 
city; local architects combined 
their talents to design and con- 
struct a replica of Wilmington 
for display during the presenta- 
tion and Hugh Morton created 
a series of color slides to com- 
plement Cameron's speech. 

When the big day arrived 
November 16 for the city's ac- 
tual presentation of its case 
before the All-America City 
Jury in St. Louis, Mo., a 44- 
man delegation was on hand 
to lend enthusiastic support. 
Cameron unfolded the city's 
story: 

"Wilmington was shaken out 
of a half century of compla- 
cency on tbe moring of Decem- 
ber 15, 1954. when the Atlantic 
Coast Line Railroad announced 



10 



Westinghouse Gets 
NAF Property Deed 



At ceremonies at the former 
Weeksville Naval Air Facility 
this morning, Westinghouse 
Corp. became official owner of 
the property. 

L. C. Bruce, acting manager 
of the facility for the State Ports 
Authority, read a statement by 
John M. Reeves, chairman of 
the Ports Authority, who was 
111 and could not be present. 

"The North Carolina state 
Ports Authority considers it a 
rare occasion for service to 
transfer the deed to this property 
to the Westinghouse Electric 
Corp. The purchase of this 
property for $500,000 seems a 
pretty good guarantee that fu- 
ture Industrial development of 
the area Is a certainty. When 
the Ports Authority acquired 
this land in January 1965, from 
the U. S. Navy, its firm inten- 
tion was to develop water- 
related commerce and Industry 
here. This transfer to West, 
inghouse, we believe, has ful- 
filled this purpose, and once 
again we take this opportunity 
to thank Governor Moore, the 
Council of State, the Depart- 



The City Council, County Com. 
missioners, tax supervisor, and 
manager of the Chamber of Com- 
merce were all introduced to 
Andrews. 

Herbert Small, representing 
the Ports Authority, handed over 
the deed of the facility to An- 
drews and Bruce gave Andrews 
the key to the front gate. An- 
drews said that "this key sym- 
bolizes a new facility for West- 
inghouse and the area." 

He mentioned that Westing- 
house had received another key 
which symbolizes friendship and 
appreciation. He was referring 
to the key to the city given to 
Westinghouse when a group of 
area business and civic leaders 
flew to Pittsburgh to personally 
thank Westinghouse. 

Bruce then turned over the 
North Carolina state flag and 
the American flag to Andrews 



ment of Conservation and De 
velopment, and all the people 
of the community who have co- 
operated so well In this endea 
vor," the statement read. 

Richard Andrews, industrial 
relations manager for Westing, 
house, handed the check for 
$500,000 to Bruce. Andrews 
said that never before had West- 
inghouse been so well received 
in a community. "We'll do our 
best to provide good work for 
this area, and above all we will 
be good neighbors," he said. He 
added that neither Leigh Bench, 
manager of I-XL, or Donald C. 
Burnham, president of Westing, 
house, could attend, but that both 
men had sent their sincere ap. 
preclation to the area and the 
hope that the relationship be 
tween Westinghouse and the area 
will be a warm and lasting one. 

Bob Leak of the Department 
of Conservation and Develop 
ment said that the people of 
Northeastern North Carolina de 
serve this opportunity thorough 
ly and he expressed his appre 
elation on the part of the depart 
ment to the Westinghouse Corp. 



PORTS AUTHORITY 

BOWS OUT 

IN PASQUOTANK 



Daily Advance (reprint) 



ELIZABETH CITY, N. C, THURSDA 




WESTINGHOUSE GETS DEED-In a formal 
ceremony at the former Weeksville Naval Air 
Facility this morning a deed was formally 
turned over to WestinRhouse Corp. bv the State 
Ports Authority. Dick Andrews (left), industrial 
relations manager for Westinghouse, turned 



over a check for $500,000 and in turn receivec 
from Herbert Small (right), a deed to the pro- 
perty. In center is L. C. Bruce, who has beei 
acting manager of the facility for the Port; 
Authority. 



11 



DOWN THE HISTORY 




12 



iAND TRAIL 




1779 MAP OF NORTH CAROLINA SHOWING 
THE RIVERS AND HARBORS. THE RE- 
MARKABLE THING IS THE NEAR ACCU- 
RACY USING CANOES INSTEAD OF AERIAL 
PHOTOGRAPHY. (THIS MAP COURTESY OF 
DEE GEE'S GIFT SHOP, MOREHEAD CITY, 
N. C). 



13 




JA5. W. DAVIS. 
S7ATZ;-"A?AN 
THE N. C. MAR: 

AT THE W n . M I 



IXECTTTVE DIP.ECTOB. SPA AXD MASAYA MIYOSHI. ECOXOMIC RESEARCH COXSELTAXT, EXITED 
RADE COrXCIL. WASHLXGTOX, D. C. LOOKLXG AT THE MOSAIC MERAL AT THE EXTRAXCE TO 
ME BETLDLXG, WTT.M TV GTOX. OX THE OCCASIOX OF MS. MTYOSHTS VISIT TO BE GEEST SPEAKER 
TOX ETWAXIS CLEB. 



South Atlantic & Caribbean Ports Association 



THE SOETH ATLANTIC & CARIBBEAN' PORTS ASSOCLATIOX HELD ITS AXXEAL MEETTXG IX WASHLXGTOX. D. C WITH 
SEVERAL XCSPA STAEF LX ATTEXDAXCE. JAMES W. DAVIS OF SPA IS PRESIDEXT, HARRY JACKSOX IS SECP.ETART. 
E. E. LEE, JR., AXD CHARLES McXEELL ALSO ATTEXDED. 



TO N. C STATE UNIVERSITY PRINT SHOP 

BOX 5517 

STATE COLLEGE STATION 

RALEIGH. N. C. 27607 

Please let us have your correct address and zip code if you wish to 
continue the North Carolina State Ports Magazine. 



Name 



Address 



Zip 



Westward Expansion Begins 
at 
Morehead City 



Jean Moore SPA 





EXPANSION HAS BEGTUN AT MOREHEAD CITY. THE WHARF 
LINE IS BEING EXTENDED 1075 FT. TO THE WEST. THIS 
EXPANSION IS THE RESULT OF A 3y 2 MILLION DOLLAR 
APPROPRIATION FROM THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 1965. 
MOREHEAD CITY HAS SHOWN STEADY GROWTH IN GENERAL 
CARGO AND BULK COMMODITIES. 



MISS JEAN MOORE, AN EMPLOYEE OF THE N. C. STATE 
PORTS, SHOWN HERE AS SHE RECEIVES COMMENDATION. 
MISS MOORE MADE A SUGGESTION WHICH CHANGED BUSI- 
NESS FORMS USED IN TRANSFER OF CARGO RECORDS, SAV- 
ING TIME AND LABOR OF SEVERAL PEOPLE INVOLVED. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




JOty 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

G. D. Zealand, Executive Director 

Drawer B 919-728-4527 

Beaufort, N. C. Courthouse Annex 



WORKSHOP IN CHARLOTTE SUCCESS 

Forty people from that many industries at- 
tended the REEC Workshop in Charlotte on 
March 24 and 25 at UNC. Joel New of the United 
States Department of Commerce said it was the 
best yet. 



oWofttd (Vo&na Skipping Co. 



STEAMSHIP & FORWARDING AGENTS 

STEVEDORES 
MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



TWX: 919-255-2925 
Phone: 919-726-6173 
P. O. Box 650 



F.M.C. License .= 1079 
Cable Address 
"Dovies" 



15 



World Trade Association To Meet In Pinehurst 



On May 22nd and 23rd at the Carolina Hotel in 
Pinehurst will be the second annual meeting for the 
North Carolina World Trade Association, composed 
of two hundred members from all over North Caro- 
lina. 

Peter Browne Ruffin, the President, recently an- 
nounced that this would be the first two-day meeting 
of the association. A full program is planned for 
everyone. Early arrivals will probably want to play 
golf on Sunday afternoon. There will be a Dinner 
Meeting that evening; a golf tournament for the 
ladies Monday; a meeting for the membership and 
a golf tournament for the men on Monday. Accommo- 



dations are available at the Carolina Hotel in Pine- 
hurst. 

In charge of the program is Walker Taylor, Jr., of 
Wilmington. Chas. (Pete) Harris and Gene Hum- 
phries of Charlotte are looking after entertainment; 
Tad Shell of Charlotte is in charge of publicity; Lem 
Doss of Wilmington is chairman of golf, and L. C. 
Bruce of Raleigh is coordinator of arrangements and 
information. 

Over one hundred couples are expected to attend, 
and if you are in world trade in North Carolina and 
are interested in membership, contact the World 
Trade Office, 205 South Church Street, Room 301, 
Charlotte, N. C, Zip Code 28201. 



RIEGEL PAPER CO. 







THE STEEL FRAMEWORK FOR RIEGEL PAPER CORPORATION'S 15,000,000 NEW PAPERBOARD MACHINE RISES ALONGSIDE 
THE BUILDING HOUSING THE "CAROLINA BELLE." THE PULP AND PAPERBOARD DIVISION OF RIEGEL IS LOCATED IN 
THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF COLUMBUS COUNTY ON THE CAPE FEAR RIVER. RIEGEL IS GOOD CUSTOMER OF SPA. 



16 




HERE'S A SPECTACULAR VIEW OF BEAUFORT INLET LOOKING SEAWARD SHOWING THE COAST GUARD CUTTER CHILULA 
AT HER NEW BERTH, FORT MACON, THE NEW GROINS AT FORT MACON BUILDING UP THE BEACH, AND A NAVY VESSEL 
LYING OFF SHORE IN THE INLET. BEAUFORT INLETS HAS A PROJECT DEPTH OF 35 FT, MAINTAINED BY THE U. S. 
CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 



N. C. Furniture Sold in Europe 



On his return from the International Furniture Fair 
held in Cologne, Germany, January 25th through 30th, 
where eight North Carolina manufacturers exhibited their 
products for the first time in the United States exhibit, 
Ed Mercaldo, Export Coordinator, reports that the exhibit 
was a real success. Sales of furniture by the sixteen 
manufacturers who took part in the United States exhibit 
are estimated at between six and seven million dollars 
this year. 

While in Europe for the Fair, the Coordinator visited 
key cities in England, The Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, 
Switzerland, Italy, Spain, Sweden and Denmark, where 
he contacted top U. S. officials, leading bankers, Chambers 
of Commerce and other important parties to discuss the 
wide range of North Carolina products available to poten- 
tial buyers in these countries. 

As a result of this trip and the contacts made, it is felt 
that there are outstanding opportunities for North Caro- 
lina exporters to enter the export market in Europe at 
this time. Currently plans are being formulated for new 
and distinctive approaches for selling North Carolina 
products. 

Interested manufacturers who would like to increase 
their export sales or to enter the export market for the 
first time are invited to call on the Coordinator to discuss 
means for accomplishing these ends. 




SALES MANAGER E. H. Hoouk of the Hickory Chair Co. (top. left), and Edword 
E. Sheldon (bottom, left), vice president of Western Stickley Co., had a busy 
time with buyers. Many visitors came for business, others to admire (below, right). 



17 



EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
Edward L. Mercaldo 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 

Meat Products 

Germany — Meat, game, poultry, portioned, for use 
in large kitchens ; poultry parts and edible internal 
organs. "Jaegermeyer", Jaeger & Meyer, 75 Karls- 
ruhe -Baden, Amthausstrasse 16. 

Dairy Products 

Iraq — Powdered skim milk, in bags. Iraq Biscuit 
and Chocolate Industries, W.L.L., c o Hasso Market- 
ing, Rashid St., Bagdad. 
Canning, Preserving Foods 

Australia — Foodstuffs, vegetables, fruit, fish, canned 
and frozen. Bernard Cohen, Box 1739, G.P.O., Sydney, 
N.S.W. 
Grain Mill Products 

Denmark — All kinds of feed supplements. Kemovit 
A S, 131 Eygaards Alle, Copenhagen, Hellerup. 

Textile Mill Products 

Australia — Textile piece goods of all descriptions. 
A Zbar & Son Pty. Ltd. 234 Flinders Lane, Melbourne, 
Victoria. 

Jamaica — Textile dry goods, piece goods of cotton, 
rayon, wool, synthetic fibers for sale to garmet manu- 
facturers and retail stores. Central Services Ltd., 98 
Orange St., P. 0. Box 189, Kingston. 
Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Manmade Fiber, Silk 

Finland — Fabrics of manmade fiber and silk (yard 
goods only), women's dress fabrics, curtain fabrics. 
Requests full details, price lists, terms. Oy Asionin- 
tikeskus W. J. Maass, Mikonkatu 9, Helsinki 10. 

Mali — Synthetic cloth for women's robes. Requests 
samples, replies in French. Somiex ( Government- 
owned importer, wholesaler, retailer), B.P. 182, 
Bamako. 
Narrow Fabrics, Other Smallwares Mills 

Austria — Lace, elastic lace, other accessory ma- 
terials for foundation garments. Not interested in 
offers of finished foundation garments. Requests re- 
plies in German. Leo Auer, Goldschmiedgasse 8, 
A-1010 Vienna. 
Yarn, Thread Mills 

Mali — Thread for sewing machines. Requests re- 
plies in French. Somiex (Government-owned importer, 
wholesaler, retailer), B.P. 182, Bamako. 
Textile Goods 

Finland — Textile fabrics (yard goods only), 
women's dress fabrics, curtain fabrics. Requests full 
details, price lists, terms. Oy Asiointikeskus W. J. 
Maass, Milonkatu 9, Helsinki 10. 
Wood Products 

England — Hickory pick and sledge hammer shafts. 
Hardun & Sons Ltd., Contractors Tools Division, Hor- 
ton Rd., West Drayton, Middlesex. 
Pulp Mills 

Korea — Wool pulp, bleached or unbleached, sulphate. 
and sulphate. Ewon Industrial Co., Ltd. I. P.O. Box 
2468, Seoul. 



Industrial Chemicals 

Mali — Sulphuric acis, in 5-gallon bottles. Requests 
replies in French. Somiex (Government-owned im- 
porter, wholesaler, retailer), B.P. 182, Bamako. 

Netherlands — Chemicals; all kinds. Exclusive com- 
mission agency for western Europe. N. V. Inter- 
nationale Ertshandel "Wambersie", 7a Calandstratt, 
or P. O. Box 1439, Rotterdam. 
Cement, Hydraulic 

Tahvan — White cement. Alliance Industrial Corp., 
P. O. Box 1668, Taipei. 

Cutlery, Hand Tools, General Hardware 

Germany — Hardware for windows and doors. Re- 
quests quotations cif Hamburg; replies in German. 
Schmidt & Meldau, 46 Follerstrasse, 5 Koeln a. Rh. 
Fabricated Metal Products 

Belgium — All kinds of tube fittings; couplings el- 
bows, nuts. Agency for Benelux countries. Societe 
Beige de Representation et de Fabrication Industriel- 
les, S.O.B.E.F.A.R.E. S.P.R.L., 88 Rue Mercelis, 
Brussels. 
Farm Machinery 

Korea — Agricultural equipment : farm emplements. 
Samsung Moolsan Co., Ltd., 5th floor Samsung Bldg., 
50, 1-ka, Ulchi-ro, Chung-ku, Seoul. 

Pakistan — Agricultural equipment for planting and 
harvesting of crops ; farm earthmoving equipment. 
Requests catalogs, quotations c&f Karachi. Taseer 
Sons, 5 Nadir House, McLeod Rd., Karachi 2. 
Construction, Mining, Materials Handling 

Machinery 

Belgium — Industrial stackers, hoists, trucks, capable 
of handling containers with capacity of 50,000 lb. 
Gebroeders Verbist, 1 bis Autostrade, Breendonck. 

Korea — Heavy equipment for construction and other 
purposes, including dredging machinery. Samsung 
Moolsan Co., Ltd., 5th Floor, Samsung Bldg., 50, 1-ka, 
Ulchi-ro, Chung-ku, Seoul. 
General Industrial Machinery 

Australia — Machinery for filling plastic containers 
with liquid or powder (used in film developing). Olims 
Consolidated Ltd., 51-61 Princes Highway, St. Peters, 
N.S.W. 

Office, Computing, Accounting Machines 

Finland — Machines for bulk mailing, counting, 
wrapping, bundling. Requests full details, price lists, 
terms. Paul Rinne & Co., Dosentintie 3, Helsinki. 
Electric Transmission, Distribution Equipment 

France — Electronic measuring instruments. Fabri- 
cations Radio-Electroniques Industrielles, 172 Rue de 
Courcelles, Paris 17e. 
Toys, Amusement, Sporting, Athletic Goods 

Kenya — Fishing tackle, such as reels, rods, lures, 
lines. G.S. Martin & Co., Ltd., P. O. Box 30189, Nai- 
robi. 

Morocco — Mechanical and educational games for 
use in nurseries, holiday camps, kindergartens. Quo- 
tations Casablanca. Sgafimex, 115 Boulevard Mo- 
hammed V, Casablanca. 



18 






/ 




namaste 
means hello 

in india... 
waehcroia means business! 

If you want to establish a plant, trade or travel in India... see Wachovia. 
A Wachovia International Specialist can help you do business better in 
India... or anywhere in the free world. His fingers are on the economic 
pulse of six continents. He can smooth the way... right away... for buying 
and selling in every major world market. Look to Wachovia International 
for all this... and more: trade leads/credit reports/untangling exchange 
regulations/acceptance financing/let- "\7C77V€" >, T-Tf"Y\ZT A 
ters of credit/collection of drafts for ^^^Vi^-^coMpk^ 

gOOOS Shipped abroad. MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 




WALTER FRIEDERICHS 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WAREHOUSES: Storage warehouses of 400,000 square 
feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. Bonded ware- 
house space available. Additional 100,000 square foot 
warehouse under construction. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL: Customs Appraisal Service pro- 
vided in modern appraiser warehouse at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water (being deepened to 38 
feet), and supported by tank farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Transit sheds with 386,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry with 
sprinkler and deluge systems (new 120,000 sq. ft. shed 
under construction). 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Ten acres paved open storage, acces- 
sible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
truck and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 3,695 feet long with a 50-foot apron. Capacity — seven 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water (being deep- 
ened to 38 feet). 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnets 
and 2 and 6-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomo- 
tive crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




i 



~ 



i 



CHARLES McNEILL 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth of 35 feet at mean low water. 
Additional 2 ship berths totaling 1,075 feet under con- 
struction. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 100,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
and one of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses, totaling 
456,000 square feet, with sprinkle and deluge systems. 
— Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on ter- 
minal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, full 
length of wharf. Single depressed track full length of 
rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Southern Rail- 
way freight car storage yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with de- 
tachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization 
cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 




LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
also easy level access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cy- 
anide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 
chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern-A&EC Railway Sys- 
tem and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 






A Facility of 
North Carolina Sta 
P. O. Box 578 
Southport, N. C. 
Area 919-457-2621 



tate Ports Authority 

28461 
21 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 



H. A. Schmidt 
Manager 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island - Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



22 



PETER B. RUFFIN 

President 

W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Manager — Import Dept. 



L. L DOSS, JR. 
Vice President — Traffic 



L. M. WALLACE 
Manager — Export Dept. 



JESSE C. JACOBS 
Asst. Mgr. — Import Dept. 



Wilmington 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



P. O. Box 1809 
Phone 763-7333 



Cable Address 
WILSHIPCO 



TWX NO. 510 937-0311 




AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. 

2. 

3. 



Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 
Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 
N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



M 






BARBER 



LINE 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES. INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Coost Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 



Agent: Morehcad City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



23 



PETER B. RUFFIN 
President 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Traffic Manager 



A. C. SMITH 

Manager 



L. L. DOSS. JR. 
Vice President — Traffic 



L. M. WALLACE 
Mgr.-Export Dept. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City Shipping Co. 



ai,l-i 



ffib 



F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919 255-2989 



T 



W W,TH 

KTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Finer & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 



fc Jfe 




Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



24 



F M.C. No 49E 



The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 



1211 McColl Street 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. Box 93 

Atando Station 
Charlotte, N. C. 28286 



Norfolk-Newport News, Va. 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldg 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 91 9-762-6352 



Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 



"YOUR KODAK DEALER' 



Photo Processors 



Color 



Block & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone RO 36263 



119 Market Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO, 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING BUILDING. RALEIGH 



Heide Company, Inc. 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

PO Box 232. Tel: (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



IULK » 
U. 5 Poi | 

PAI 

Rokiflh. I- 
Permit No I 



Heide Salutes 
1,893 YEARS 
of Distinguished Servi 




This impressive collective number of years reflects the exceptional 
durability and scope of service rendered to international com- 
merce by the progressive companies with which Heide is privi- 
leged to work in the productive ports of Wilmington and Morehead 
City, North Carolina. 

We take pride in saluting these distinguished companies which 
have contributed so dynamically to the prosperity of North Carolina 
and to the success of the North Carolina State Ports Authority. 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC 



FOUNDED 1869 



(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 
WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • Forwarding Agents • Stevedores 



VottA 




honour 
mexarag fiieJfo 

axaeBouica mexaRg bygiraegg! 

A Wachovia International Specialist can help 
you do business better in France... or 
anywhere in the free world. His fingers are on 
the economic pulse of six continents. He 
can smooth the way . . . right away . . . for 
buying and selling in every major world 
market. Look to Wachovia International for 
all this . . . and more: trade leads/credit reports 
untangling exchange regulations/acceptance 
financing/letters of credit/collection of 
drafts for goods shipped abroad. 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 




North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 22 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad - 24 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County 23 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. _... -24 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 17 

Glasgow Hicks Co. - 1 

Heide Company, Inc.-Luckenbach Back Cover 

Heide Company, Inc. — 1 

Hi-Page Co. _._ Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line - 23 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. ... 23 

New Hanover County _. 22 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. ... Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co. - -22 

North Carolina National Bank 19 

Southern Railway System 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. Inside Front Cover 

Walker Taylor Insurance 24 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc 23 

Wilmington Shipping Co 22 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc. —23 



N. C 
Doc 



F^K*) 








Whenever shipping worries make you 
grouchy it's time to give one of our Sales 
Representatives a call. He'll have you 
feeling like a cub again in no time. Try us 
and see. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 




Heide Company, Inc. 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS ■ STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

PO Box 232 Tel (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



Texas Gulf's Earnings More Than Doubled 
In First Quarter On 54% Increase In Sales 



GOVERNOR MOORE ANNOUNCES PLANS 



TGS MEETS IN AURORA, N. C. 




The Council of State, meeting in Raleigh Tuesday, 
July 12, approved a contract between Texas Gulf 
Sulphur Company and the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority calling for construction by the Authority of 
a bulk cargo facility at Morehead City through which 
the mining company will ship an anticipated one mil- 
lion tons of export cargo annually, beginning on July 
1, 1968. 

The shipping facility will cost approximately 10 
million dollars and is to be financed by a loan being 
negotiated by the Ports Authority with the Economic 
Development Administration of the United States De- 
partment of Commerce. Plans and specifications are 
ready and bids will be invited as soon as financing ar- 
rangements have been completed. 

The facility, which will be located in and adjacent 
to the present Morehead City Port Terminal, will 
consist of docks to accommodate two ocean-going 
vessels, a 2500 tons per hour loading tower, a con- 
veyor system, a storage warehouse of 106 thousand 
tons capacity, and a barge unloading terminal on the 
Inland Waterway. The site is approximately 42 miles 
from Texas Gulf Sulphur's multi-million dollar Lee 
Creek phosphate mine and fertilizer material com- 
plex on the Pamlico River near Aurora in Beaufort 
County. 

Although Texas Gulf will have priority on use, the 
shipping facility has been designed to handle other 
types of bulk cargo and will be available to other com- 
panies, as required. 




By Albert R. Karr 
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal 



AURORA, N. C— Texas Gulf Sulphur Co. reported 
first quarter earnings that more than doubled year- 
earlier profit on a 54% rise in sales. 

Claude 0. Stephens, president, told the annual meet- 
ing, however, that while Texas Gulf expects 1966 to 
be "a much better year" than 1965, "we won't be able 
to maintain the same percentage increase (in earn- 
ings) for the year as a whole as we experienced in the 
first quarter." 

The Texas Gulf stockholder meeting was held out- 
side Texas, where the company is incorporated, for 
the first time in its 57 years of shareholder meetings. 
The meeting, held in a still-empty building that will 
house the maintenance facility of the company's new 
Lee Creek phosphate mine and fertilizer plant, was 
attended by about 225 stockholders. This is about the 
same number who showed up for the Texas Gulf meet- 
ing in Houston a year ago. 
CHANGE IN SITE "JUSTIFIED" 

Mr. Stephens told shareholders that the decision to 
meet at this site about 130 miles southeast of Raleigh, 
N. C, "has been well justified by the attendance. We 
have stockholders in attendance from more places than 
ever before." 

"From time to time," Mr. Stephens said, we may 
have the annual meeting at other company locations." 
Stockholders at this meeting were shown color slides 
depicting major Texas Gulf operations, with a re- 
corded narrative; treated to a postmeeting lunch of 
fried fish and hush puppies prepared by the Beaufort 
County Fish and Wildlife Association; and taken on a 
tour of the Lee Creek facilities, which recently went 
into operation. A railroad official commented privately 
that extra railroad cars were put on for the occasion 
though they seemingly weren't needed to serve the 
plant. 

The Texas Gulf executive said the Lee Creek phos- 
phate complex was planned so that capacity can be 
doubled when needed, and he said world needs for 
phosphate and other chemical fertilizer materials are 
growing so fast "that expansion is only a matter of 
proper timing." In remarks during the post-meeting 
press conference he said annual output of the Lee 
Creek facilities will reach 3 million tons of phosphate 
rock later this year. 

Wall St. Journal 
(SEE PAGE 11) 



BULK HANDLING FACILITY AS PROJECTED 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

JOHN M. REEVES. Chairman, Pinehurst 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
WILLIAM H. GLENN, Greenville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS. Fayetteville 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 
HENRY LKE WEATHERS, Shelby 



North Carolina Sfate Library 

Raleigh 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 




STBTE PORTS 




WILMINGTON OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

HUGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



SUMMER ISSUE, 1966, SPA MAGAZINE 



. VOL. 12. NO. 2 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 
Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PArk. 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



CONTENTS 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 
P. O. Box 3037-28403 
Tel. 919 ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 
W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 
H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 
Telephone 919-457-2621 
P. O. Box 578-28461 



Texas Gulf Sulphur Coming to Morehead 

Reeves Completing Nine Years 

Newsmen Visit SPA 

1,000th Tobacco Ship in Morehead City 

Mr. Goto Promoted 

The Dredge Cherokee 

British Consul Visits Port City 

N. C. World Trade Association 

Down The Historyland Trail 

Newsmen Visit SPA 

Trimaran Launched 

Tar Heel Products Invade Europe 

Exportunities 



Page 

2 
4 
5 

6 

8 

8 

9 

10 

12 

14 

15 

17 

18 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 




RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 119-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE. Director Public Relations 



■. 




COVER STORY 

First man used a raft 20.000 yrs. 
ago. Then he developed ships. 

Here is a pictorial history of 
ships taken from a photograph of 
an educational poster, available at 
the Book Exchange in Chapel Hill 
and other sources. 

Notice the ancient Phoenician 
and early ships of 6.000-4.000 B.C. 

In the next 7.000 years we pro- 
gressed to the steamboat. In the 
next 100 years we made it to the 
atomic era. (Large poster of cover 
copyrighted by Educational Post- 
ers, Inc.. and available at book 
stores.) 



REEVES COMPLETING NINE YEARS 
As Leader Of Burgeoning N. C. Ports 




JOHN M. REEVES SIGNS CONTRACT 

This issue of the State Ports Magazine is the 35th 
in succession published during the time one man has 
been Chairman of the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority. He has been Chairman since November, 
1957, and has just completed the most successful 
fiscal year in the history of the Ports Authority. 

Therefore, it is appropriate this issue be dedicated 
to the native North Carolinian who has steered its 
course through nine, sometimes stormy, but suc- 
cessful years. He is John Mercer Reeves of Pine- 
hurst. He is Chairman of the Board of Reeves Broth- 
ers, Inc., New York City. He is a native of Surry 
County, and was educated at the Mt. Airy Schools, 
Oak Ridge Preparatory school and received his A.B. 
at the University of North Carolina in 1910. He also 
did graduate work at the University of Chicago and 
in textiles at North Carolina State University. He 
has been awarded an L.L.D. from American Univer- 
sity at Washington, D. C. and the same degree from 
Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina. 




MRS. JOHN M. REEVES AND MR. REEVES 
AT HOME, PINEHURST, N. C. 

Mr. Reeves is former president of the Board of 
Education of Summit, New Jersey, and served as a 
member of the Board of Directors of the Greater New 
York Councils, Boy Scouts of America and as a Chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees of American University 
and Centenary College for Women at Hackettstown, 
New Jersey. He has been active in YMCA work and 
is a benefactor of the Methodist College of Fayette- 
ville and the Boy Scout Camp, which bears his name, 
near Carthage, N. C. He is married to Virginia Mc- 
Kenzie Reeves and they have three daughters, Virginia 
C, Ann C. and Emily M. 

During his tenure, the Ports Authority has seen 
the terminals at Wilmington and Morehead City 
increased from a $7,500,000 Capital Investment to 
over $33,000,000 committed investment. 

Tonnages approach the 1,000,000 per year mark, 
and income this past fiscal year from operations will 
be in excess of $1,800,000 compared to 1952-53, the 
first year of operation when income was less than 
$100,000 and tonnages about 35,000. 



Newsmen 
To Take 
SPA Tour 



A dozen North Carolina news- 
paper editors and publishers 
will tour the State Ports Au- 
thority (SPA) terminals here 
Thursday. 

SPA director James W. Davis 
said the newspaper executives 
will arrive at the New Hanover 
Airport about 10:30 a.m 

Davis said the men will be 
taken to the SPA Maritime 
Building on Bnrnett Boule- 
vard for a briefing on the 
terminal's operation. Follow- 
ing that, the executive will 
tour the facilities. 
After the tour here, the group 
will board an airplane for 
Morehead City, where they will 
tour the SPA facilities there 
during the afternoon. 

Representing newspapers wfll 
be: Al. G. Dickson, Star-News 
Newspaper; Tom Inman, Ra- 
leigh News and Observer; J. 
Patrick Kelly, Winston - Salem 
Journal; Mark Longcrier, Fay 
etteville Observer; Robert C. 
Page III, Durham Morning 
Herald. 

Rye B. Page, Star • News 
Newspapers; Conrad Paysour. 
Greensboro Daily News; 
Douglas Reid; Ashville Citiz- 
en - Times Richard Senter 
Elizabeth City Daily Advance; 
M. S. Van Hecke, Charlotte 
Observer; and Henry L. 
Weathers, Shelby Star. 
Representatives of port indus- 
try to be present: 

Richard E. Barker, Heidc 
Co.; William T. Davies, N. C 
Shipping Co.; Peter Broon Ruf 
fin, Wilmington Shipping Co. 
and 0. W. Waters Jr.; Water; 
Shipping Co. 

James H. Witherspoon witl 
the N. C. National Bank vvil 
also be present. 

Representing the SPA will 
be Henry L. Weathers, board 
member, James W. Davis, L. 
C. Bruce, director of Informa- 
tion; Walter H. Friederichfi 
Jr., Wilmington operations 
manager; E. E. Lee Jr., di- 
rector of commerce; a n 
Charles R. McNeill, Morehead 
City operations manager. 




An Eye-Opener 
On Fort Side I 

WILMINGTON— The men who run | 
the State Eorts Authority sing i 
a state song. 

You think at first that this is the 1 
same old advertising jingle. 

You hear that the merchants in | 
Wilmington feel it every time a ship 1 
is worked at the docks. You see in 1 
the new manufacturing and service 1 
plants around here, Morehead City, § 
and other Coastal Plains towns ad- 1 
ditional evidence of the impact the i 
ports have on this area's economy. 

But then the ports authority | 
people hit you with this figure: 80 f 
per cent of the tonnage handled at 1 
the Wilmington and Morehead City I 
ports last year originated west of § 
Raleigh. 

That's 80 per cent of roughly one 1 
million tons. 

The second verse of the state 1 
ports' song is in a foreign language 1 
... a dozen languages, really. 

Because we've been told we have 1 
the two fastest growing ports along 1 
the Eastern seaboard in the handling 1 
of foreign trade. 

All of which should broaden § 
North Carolinians' vision — and our | 
economy — considerably. 

Reprint — JOURNAL AND SENTINEL, 
Winston-Salem 




By ROBERT C. PAGE 

Hartld sun Wriltr 



I 



Included in a great deal of enlightenment about 
North Carolina ports showered upon a group of 
newsmen last week was the fact that commercial 
firms which assume responsibility for 
seeing that cargo is loaded and dis- 
charged from vessels are known as 
stevedores. 

Port officials have found that most 
people believe that stevedores are the 
men who actually do the labor at the 
docks. They are part of organized la- 
bor known a3 longshoremen. 

Another misunderstanding about 




PAGE 



the state ports is that Eastern 
North Carolina benefits exclu- 
sively from the operation of the 
ports. 

Representatives of the steve- 
doring companies and officials 
of the State Ports Authority are 
anxious to make the public, 
especially businessmen, aware 
of the enormous potential of the 
state's shipping enterprise to 
the entire economy of North 
Carolina, 

Because of growing pains, the 
SPA is forced now to turn away 
business. Movement of some 
commodities requires a long 



storage period, which creates 
the need for more storage space. 
However, about 1.200 different 
commodities pass through North 
Carolina's ports every year. 

A typical growth statistic for 
comparison can be found at the 
Wilmington port. It handled 16 
vessels in 1952. The number last 
year was 417. 

At Morehead City, which spe- 
cializes in tobacco processing, 
the number grew from two to- 
bacco vessels in 1953 to 124 ves- 
sels. The total vessels last year 
was 332. 



'Business Beat. 




Everything 
But Cotton 

By Conrad Paysour — 



Reprint— WILMINGTON NEWS, 
May 12, 1961! 



Goods from all over the world flow through 
the North Carolina jiorts at-Witarngton and More- 
head City. And products from North Carolina, 
bound for the four comers of the world, flow out. 
' Coming in, there are such things as fine wines 
from France, steel from West Germany, textile 
machinery parts from many parts of the world, 
synthetic fiber, chemicals for the U. S. textile in- 
dustry, lumber for the furniture industry, fertilizer 
compounds for farmers and many other items. 

The items being exported are about as varied. 
For example, take the month of March. During 
that month, commodities which were shipped out 
included such things as firebrick, machinery, dry 
milk, rations for military personnel overseas, road 
making equipment, tobacco, woodpulp and scrap. 

Last week, a group of newspapermen visited 
the State ports at Morehead City, and although it 
really wasn't planned that way, tlie freighter Wurt- 
temberg from Hamburg, Germany, was tied up at 



Reprint— DURHAM HERALD. May 17. 1966 

the Wilmington docKS. She was unloading :j,uUU tuns 
of general cargo — the largest - : nX» 
general cargo ever to v.oir.'e through a North Caro- 
lina port. 



Textiles Largest Customer 

One thing that struck us was that the North 
Carolina textile industry is probably the largest 
fingle user of North Carolina ports. 

Yet, not one single bale of cotton is shipped in 
or out of state ports. The reason this seemed un- 
. usual at first glance is that the textile industry is 
certainly the state's most important industry. Yet, 
the industry uses very little North Carolina cotton, 
because most of the cotton grown in the state is 
not suitable for use by the industry. So the in- 
dustry uses cotton from such places as California, 
Texas and Egypt. 

Most of the foreign cotton used by the textile 
industry comes through the port at Charleston, 
S. C. 

Why doesn't it come through North Carolina 
ports? 

James W. Davis, executive director of the 
North Carolina Ports Authority, explained that at 
present, the ports in the state are not equipped to 
handle cotton. 

Cotton requires long storage, and all of the 
storage space now at the ports is taken up with 
items which can be moved through the ports 
quickly. 

Reprint QRBENSBORO DAILY NEWS, May 15. 1966 






1,000th Ship at Morehead 



Reprint— NEWS & OBSERVER, Raleigh 



Milestone in Tobacco Exports 



By ROY HARDEE 

MOREHEAD CITY - Thir- 
teen years ago the first North 
Carolina tobacco was loaded at 
the State pert here for export 
overseas. 

A total of .1,000 hogheads of 
leaf was shipped from the new 
port as it fought for survival 
and entry into the world mar- 
ket with limited facilities. 

Last week, the 1,000th ship 
arrived in Morehead City for 
Eastern Carolina tobacco. 

Since that meager beginning 
in 1953, the Morehead City port 
has become an important cog 
in oversea tobacco shipments, 
shipping yearly one third of the 
total exported tobacco. 

Bright Future 

Its future in the world tobac- 
, co export market appears very 
bright and its growth will be 
controlled by the extent to 
which its port facilities are ex- 
panded. 

In 1965 a total o* 127,000 hog- 
heads of tobacco went through 
the Morehead City port to set 
! a new record and port records 
! indicate that this will be topped 
| by several thousand in 1966. 

The Korendyk, a merchant 
j ship of tne Holland- America I 
j Line, was received with a cele- 
l bration when it docked this 
[week and the captain, E. H. J. 
Cunaeus, was presented the 



keys to the city by Mayor 
George Dill 

More than 1400 hogheads of 
North Carolina leaf was loaded 
ahead of schedule on the Koren- 
dyk. 

The 491-foot craft with a crew 
oi 46 has Rotterdam as its 
home port. 

Value of the tobacco cargo 
was estimated in excess of $1.5 
million. 

Long lines of transfer trucks 
are familiar sights at the More- 
head port. 

Storage units are generally 
booked just as soon as new 
ones are constructed and all in- 
dications point to additional to- 
bacco business when more ware- 
house and handling space is 
provided. 

Many other items move in 



and out of the port during the 
year, such as lumber, oil and 
gasoline and general cargo but 
tobacco is the lifeblcod of the 
port's volume. Considerable 
military traffic is channeled in 
and out of the port carrying 
Camp Lejeune Marines and 
their equipment. 

At present the port is being 
expanded to give it two addi- 
tional berths and preparations 
are underway for the handling 
of large shipments of phosphate 
from the Texas Gulf mine in 
Aurora. 

Phosphate may well be a 
strong contender as the lead- 
ing money producer in years to 
come but the future of North 
Carolina tobacco shipments for 
export remains bright. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: JIM EDMUNDSON, TOBACCO SUPT.; CHAS. MCNEILL. MGR.: GEORGE DILL, 
MAYOR, MOREHEAD CITY; CAPT. E. H. J. CUNAEUS: DICK BARKER OF HEIDE CO., INC: 
AND JACK TILLEY OF HEIDE CO., INC. 



MAYOR GEORGE DILL. MOREHEAD CITY, GIVES THE KEY OF 
THE CITY TO CAPT. E. H. J. CUNAEUS, SS KORENDYK. 



THE SS KORENDYK— 1000th TOBACCO SHIP TO 
CALL AT MOREHEAD CITY IN ITS HISTORY. 




Members Of Ports Authority Met In Pinehurst 
In May, And Wilmington July 14 




1. to r. Ports Authority Members: E. G. Anderson, Chr. Southport Committee, William Pharr, member Fi- 
nance Committee, J. 0. Foil, Chr. Finance Commitee, E. N. Richards, V. Chairman of Authority and Chr. of 
Planning, which committee helped create history on page 2. F. H. Ross, Jr., Chairman of Personnel. Next 
to them "being sworn in last August is pictured (1.) William B. Glenn, member of Planning Committee and 
Highway Committee, (r.) George Purvis, Chr. of Highway Committee. (Shown on page 10 is H. L. Weathers, 
Chr. of Public Relations) and (Chairman John M. Reeves is on page 4.) 



Ancient Countries - Greece and Egypt -Trade In N.C. 

EGYPTIAN BOUND TOBACCO GOES IN HOLD OF S.S. HELLENIC TOBACCO GOES ABOARD S. S. HELLENIC PIONEER BOUND 

PIONEER. FOR UNITED ARAB REPUBLIC. 




GOTO PROMOTED - Nagasawa Succeeds Him 




LEFT TO RIGHT: MASATOSHI NAGASAWA: HAJIME GOTO 



Effective July first Mr. Masatoshi Nagasawa as- 
sumed the duties of Representative in Charge of the 
Raleigh Office of the Japan Monopoly Corporation. 
Mr. Hajime Goto has held this position since the open- 
ing of that office in 1963. He will return to Japan to 
accept an assignment with the Monopoly's Sales De- 
partment in Tokyo. 

Mr. Nagasawa will be assisted by Mr. Hiroshi Itoh 
who will arrive in the United States July 1 and by Mr. 
Masanao Iida who has been in the Raleigh office since 
July 1965. Mrs. Mary M. Bruce will continue to serve 
as their executive secretary. 



H. Goto, known to his American friends as "John", 
succeeded in many things during his three years in 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 

He established a wide circle of personal friends and 
performed ably as a representative of his Corporation 
and his Country, winning many new friends for both. 

Incidentally, he and Mrs. Goto are the proud par- 
ents of four children, each one of which became one 
of the top scholars in their respective schools in 
Raleigh. 



State Port Terminal 
Morehead City 



^ 



THE DREDGE. CHEROKEE, NOW WORKING ON THE WEST- 
WARD EXTENSION HAS OPENED A NEW AVENUE OF PUBLIC 
RELATIONS. NOW DREDGING AT 50 FOOT DEPTH, THOUSANDS 
OF SHINY LETTERED OLIVE SHELLS ARE BEING DUMPED 
ON THE FILLED AREA. THESE OLIVE SHELLS, LOCALLY 
KNOWN AS KEY SHELLS, ARE A FAVORITE POCKET CHARM 
FOR COASTAL PEOPLE AND THROUGH AN IDEA STARTED 
BY OUR CHIEF OF POLICE, KENNETH CANFIELD, HAVE 
BECOME A MUCH IN DEMAND SOUVENIR FOR OUR UP STATE 
VISITORS. MR. CANFIELD PASSED OUT OVER 2,000 OF THESE 
SHELLS AT THE MAIN GATE LAST MONTH. COMING FROM 
SUCH DEPTHS, THESE SHELLS, SOME HUNDREDS OF YEARS 
OLD, OFFER AN EXCELLENT REMINDER TO THE VISITORS 
AS COMING FROM THE '•HEART" OF THE STATE PORT TERMI- 
NAL. 1,136 VISITORS WERE RECORDED AT THE MAIN GATE 
DURING JUNE. 



: j^£ ^ 



^sT^ -" V 



* 



ON TRADE MISSION 







British 
Consul 
Visits 
Port City 



BRITISH CONSUL— GERALD UNDERWOOD, BRITISH CONSUL FOR THE SOUTH- 
EASTERN U .S. THURSDAY VISITED THE N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY HERE. 
JAMES W. DAVIS, EXEC. DIRECTOR NCSPA, ACCOMPANIED HIM ON A TOUR. THE 
BRITISH SHIP IN THE BACKGROUND FROM LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND, DELIVERED 
A CARGO OF LUMBER FOR N. C. FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS. (SECO PHOTO) 



A representative from the 
British Consulate - General in 
Atlanta, Ga., visited Wilming- 
ton Thursday to drum up pos- 
sibilities of increased trade. 

Gerald Underwood of Atlanta 
said his office had taken on 
additional' responsibility for 
North Carolina and was mak- 
ing a special effort to expand 
trade in the Southeast. 

The Atlanta office, he said, 
has expanded from 8 to 14 per- 
sons and has taken on about 
40 per cent more territory. The 
area now covers the Carolinas, 
Georgia, the eastern part of 
Tennessee and Alabama. 

Underwood has been making 
a series of visits in the Tar 
Heel state, contacting bankers, 
purchasing agents and similar 
persons who would be likely 
prospects for British goods 
and services. 



"Our most important j o b 
now," he explained, "is trade 
promotion. We're seeking new 
outlets for British goods. 

"We buy quite a bit of your 
leaf in Eastern North Carolina, 
but there aren't too many op- 
portunities for export," he add- 
ed. 

He said his office would be 
concentrating on the "crescent 
area" of the Piedmont, where 
he anticipated textile machinery 
would be sold. 

Wilmington was Important be- 
cause of its port, through which 
British goods would flow. Un- 
derwood visited James W. 
Davis, executive director of 
the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority. 

A native of Sussex, on the 
southern coast cf England, Un- 
derwood went into consular ser- 
vice after discharge in 1947 
from the Royal Air Force. 



He became a specialist in the. 
Hebrew language — one of the 
few consular officials facile in 
the tongue. With this special 
language ability (he also speaks 
French and German) he was 
assigned to Near East nations 
about nine years, with principal 
posts in Israel and Turkey. 

He had also served in Egypt 
and the Near East while in 
military service during World 
War II. Consular posts have 
also included Hungary, Ger- 
many and Holland. 

He has been in this country 
about 8 years and although he 
eventually hopes to return to 
a Near East post, he has a 
special reason lor returning to 
this country. 

"I brought my daughter over 
here with me," he said. "She 
was married last year to an 
Atlanta boy. We'll be coming 
back to visit even after I'm 
transferred." he added. 



Underwood has visited most 
of the cities of the Piedmont 
— Greensboro, Durham, Raleigh 
and Fayetteville. He indicated 
he would also visit Morehead 
City before returning to his At- 
lanta office. 

"I also plan to stay a little 
longer, next time I visit," he 
said, explaining that he expect- 
ed to make only preliminary 
contacts this trip, but more ex- 
tensive ones during the next. 



Reprint- WILMISGTON STAR-SEWS. 
July 8, 1966 



World Trade Association Holds Annual Meeting 




The World Trade Association 
met in Pinehurst in May for 
its annual meeting. New officers 
were elected, and Leon Moody 
of BASF in Charlotte was 
elected President. Robert Mur- 
ray was introduced as new 
Executive Director. Honorary 
memberships were awarded to: 
Former Governor Luther Hod- 
ges, Former Governor Terry 
Sanford; Former Constitution- 
al Officer John Bright Hill; 
Former Export Coordinator E. 
B. Peabody. 



HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S, CONSUL GENERAL T. C. SHARMAN, WILLIAM RUFFIN, 
BURLINGTON INDUSTRIES, LEON MOODY, PRESIDENT N. C. WORLD TRADE ASS'N. AT 
PINEHURST ANNUAL MEETING. 




LEFT TO RIGHT: JOHN M. REEVES, CHAIRMAN NCSPA; W. C. CALDWELL, MEMBER 
REEC; LEON MOODY, NEW PRESIDENT NCWTA; C. R. HARRIS, NCWTA CHR. EXEC. COM. 




JACK LEE, NCSPA; PETER B. RUFFIN, WILMINGTON SHIPPING CO. AND IMMEDIATE 
PAST PRES. NCWTA: H. L. WEATHERS, PORTS AUTHORITY MEMBER AND PUBLISHER 
OF SHELBY DAILY STAR; AND DICK FUTCHES, ASST. MG'R. HEIDE CO. INC. 

10 



Phosphate Barges Call 




Tied up at Berth No. 2, Morehrad City port, It Teiaa Golf barge No. 17. These are (be first two of a number of teiruoloadliiK 
oirftei which wW eventually bring phosphate Into Morehead City from Aurora. 




.TEXAS GUL-FSulphui barges, 
Jupt-bullt and en route to Lee's 
Creek, where the TCS mine Is 
located, stopped at Morehead City 
last week The two, TCS-16 



and TOS-17, labeled Moruhuart 
City, N. C„ were built at the 
Engals Shipbuilding firm In Mis- 
sissippi. 
Yet to be built are the speclal- 



type pusher -tugs which will 
propel the 245-foot barges. They 
were brought to North Carolina 
by a seagoing tug, using the ocean 



DELIVERY WAS madebyR.W. 
Thomas 01 the 1BC Co., Aurora. 
IBC Is a subsidiary of Interstate 



HUGH MORTON OF WILMING- 
TON AND GRANDFATHER MOUN- 
TAIN SENDS THIS PHOTO OF 
THE INIMITABLE "MITCH" MIL- 
LER IN WILMINGTON LOOKING 
AT SHIPS AT ONE OF THE INI- 
MITABLE N. C. TERMINALS. 





1 'i«~ 

tk lit r:~=53? 




DOWN THE HISTORY] 








painting by C. R. McNeill 

Tony's Sanitary Fish Market & Restaurant, 
North Carolina 

Extending out over Bogue Sound near Atlantic Heach in Morehead City, this 

restaurant with its large picture windows offers customers a perfect view of 

fishing boats and pleasure craft wending their way up and down the still waters 

of the Sound. As the name suggests, the restaurant developed from owner 

Tony Seamon's fishing boats and market. Open daily from 11 :00 a.m. to fi:30 p.m.; 

closed December IS to the first of February. The address is 501 Evans Street. 



Bogue Sound Clam Chowder 

1 quart clams 

lVS cups onion, chopped 

Vi cup salt pork or bacon fat 

3 cups potatoes, diced 

Salt and white pepper, to taste 

Clean and chop clams to desired 
size. Add onions to clams. Cover with 
water (or clam juice), add fat drip- 
pings or cubed pork and cook 30 min- 
utes or until tender. Then add potatoes; 



let come to boil. Cook until potatoes 
are creamy. Season to taste. Serves 6. 

Tar Heel Hush Puppies 
Stir together: 1 pound fine white corn 
meal; 1 egg; 1 tablespoon salt; 1 table- 
spoon sugar; pinch of soda and 1 cup 
buttermilk. Add water to make a thick 
consistency. Drop by spoonfulls into 
375° oil; cook until crisp and golden. 
Remove with slotted spoon and drain. 
Serve- with fish. Makes 6 portions. 



From Recent Issue of Ford Times Magazine. 



- 



USTD TRAIL 




This is the original survey ol North Carolina, 
reprinted through the courtesy of the State 
Department of Archives and History. If you 
wish a 36" x 19" reproduction, write to North 
Carolina State Ports Authority. P. O. Box 149, 
Raleigh, N. C. 






CAPTAIN T. J. TERPSTRA COMMANDS THE 
SOESTDYK OF THE HOLLAND-AMERICA 
LINES. SHE CALLS AT MOREHEAD CITY. 
9,492 GROSS TONS— BUILT AT BELFAST IN 
1960—493 FEET OVERALL. 





NEWSMEN AND PORT RELATED PEOPLE ON PORTICO 
N. C. MARITIME BLDG., WILMINGTON. 




The group was flown to Wilmington, then to 
Morehead City and returned home. Although the 
event was of the "whirlwind" variety, it neverthe- 
less accomplished much in providing information 
on the undertakings of these ports. 

For instance, newsmen found out that pilferage 
at Wilmington amounted to less than one-tenth of 
one per cent of the goods shipped to and from that 
port. 



Ports Authority Believes In Publicity 

If there is an agency within the framework of 
North Carolina government that realizes to the full 
extent the value of publicity, it's the State Ports 
Authority. 

This group is constantly beating the drum for 
its cause and they do it in such a way that to ignore 
the sounds would virtually be an impossibility. 

This past Thursday the Ports Authority spon- 
sored a trip for newsmen from across the state to 
take a first-hand look at port facilities at both Wil- 
mington and Morehead City. The plane — The Tar- 
heel — was donated by S & W Cafeterias and North 
Carolina National Bank. It made stops in Charlotte, 
Greensboro and Raleigh to pick up newsmen for the 
trip. 



Problem Has Old Ring Of Familiarity 

Newspapers from as far west as Asheville were 
represented on the trip. And, a point was made to 
impress upon the newsmen the far-reaching im- 
portance of adequate port facilities — even to the 
western part of the state. 

At Morehead City, one official commented that 
although that port exports about one-third of the 
total amount of tobacco shipped out, with additional 
facilities they could handle even more. "We've told 
officials that if they would get us the facilities, we 
could get the ships to dock here. In return, they tell 
us to get the ships to dock here and we'll get the 
facilities." 

That conversation seems to ring a bell — right 
close to home. 

Reprint— F A YETTEV1LLE OBSERVER. May 15, 1966 




NEWSMEN FROM 14 N. C. DAILIES WATCH GERMAN VESSEL 
APPROACH WHARF AT WILMINGTON. 



rr 




.. 



TRIMAR "52" * 

The first 52 foot trimaran built by Intercontinental 
Trimarans, Inc., Hamlet, N. C. was launched from 
the N. C. State Port Docks by their large 45 ton 
gantry crane on July 1st, 1966. 

This boat was built for Capt. and Mrs. Bud 
Geiselman of Nassau, Bahama Islands. She has a 
length of 52 feet, a beam of 26'6" and an empty 
weight of 7 tons. She carries close to 1000 square 
feet of sail in a ketch rig and a 55 H.P. diesel engine 
is installed for auxiliary power. With her triple long 
lean hulls, this boat will be able to attain speeds 
upward to 25 knots. With three private staterooms, 
each sleeping two persons and owner's quarters are 
for the Capt. and his family, the "Tri-Wind" will be 
used for charter work out of Nassau. 



I 



Hugh Hardaway has been made Director of Engi- 
neering for NCSPA. He served as assistant to the 
engineer from 1963 to December 1965. He assumed 
additional duties in January 1966 until July 1, when 
he was appointed Director. 



Q a 

"!*>**% "* «- 




E. E. Lee, Jr., Director of Commerce, which is the 
section of the Ports Authority concerned with Trade 
Development, has announced the employment of a new 
man to assist in solicitation of shippers in eastern 
North Carolina. The man who went to work on July 
1st is Miles Ray Matthis. 

Matthis lives at 114 Chula Vista Drive, Wilmington 
with his wife, Judy, and daughter, Pamela. He comes 
with us as Trade Development Representative for 
eastern North Carolina. 

He attended Oak Ridge Military Academy and At- 
lantic Christian College in Wilson. He joined Thurs- 
ton Motor Lines, working there for five years. He was 
Terminal Manager for Thurston in Wilmington be- 
fore joining the Ports Authority Staff. Ray originally 
hails from Wilson, N. C. and knows eastern North 
Carolina well. 




-AT PRESS TIME- 



R. T. Ellett — Community Relations Representative 
of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and immediate Past 
President of N. C. Travel Council told the Durham 
Rotary Club on July 25, 1966 . . . 

"The lack of east-west highways of interstate qual- 
ity is preventing our coastal areas from attracting 
more out-of-state vacationers to these resort areas. 
Our two state ports are suffering because of the lack 
of these facilities. 

"The ports of Norfolk, Charleston and Savannah and 
their beaches are served by interstate routes while 
Morehead City and Wilmington do not have even obso- 
lete four-lane highways. 

"I suggest that you give strong consideration to 
advocating the extension of Interstate hO from 
Greensboro east to the coast. When the presently 
planned Interstate hQ is completed, it will extend west- 
ward from Greensboro to Barstow, California, where 
it connects with Interstate 15 and Interstate 10 to 
the Pacific." 

15 



State Hunts 
New Buyers 
In Europe 



Edward L. Mercaldo of the 
State Conservation and Develop- 
ment said Thursday the first 
step has been taken in a project 
to sell North Carolina products 
to European countries. 

Mercaldo, export development 
coordinator for C&D, said plans 
are complete for an exhibition 
of North Carolina textile prod- 
ucts in Stockholm, Sweden. 
Oct. 24-29. 

Twenty firms already have 
signed up for the show, Mercal- 
do said, adding, "One had to 
drop out because demand for 
its products in Sweden alone j 
exceeded its production capa- 
bilities." 

The State is spending about 
$15,000 in an effort to crack 
the European market. 

Other Projects 

In addition to the textile ex- 
hibition, the projects call for 

1— A trade mission to five 
major European cities. 

2— An industrial develop- 
ment mission to key companies 
in four European countries. 

3— A mission by travel ex- 
perts to explain vacation op- 
portunities in North Carolina. 

Mercaldo said details of these 
portions of the European ven- 
ture, including itineraries and 
participants, will be announced 
in about two weeKs. 

Members of the trade mis- 
sion will include three C&D of- 
ficials and several business and 
industrial leaders. Governor 
Moore has indicated he hopes 
to spend some time this fall 
with one of the missions. 

"The people there want Amer- 
ican goods, and they can af- 
ford them." 



Reprint— NEWS & OBSERVER, 
Raleigh 






■■■» 









■"■«.«■ 







U.S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE TRADE CENTER, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN. 




COMMERCIAL 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY, MAY 1 9, 1 966 



To Kick-Off Sales Drive 

Tar Heels to Invade 
Europe During the Fall 



Svecial to Journal of Commerce 

RALEIGH, May 18 — North 
Carolina is planning to invade 
Europe in an unprecedented 
selling job of Tar Heel prod- 
ucts. Governor Dan Moore an- 
nounced today that plans call 
for the state to hold the first 
presentation featuring products 
of a single state at the U. S. 
trade center in the Swedish cap- 
ital of Stockholm on Oct. 24, 
in cooperation with the U. S. 
Dcpl. of Commerce. 

This will be the kick-off of a 
three-pronged program to pro- 
mote "North Carolina Exportu- 
nity 1966" during October and 
November by Tar Heel manu- 
facturing firms in five major 
European cities. 

"We are going to Europe," 
Governor Moore said "w i i h 



the firm conviction that this ef- 
fort will be a significant con- 
tribution to America's export ex- 
pansion program to reduce our 
balance of payments deficit. 

"We arc going because for 
each additional $1 million in- 
come in exports the State of 
Carolina will gain 150 new and 
better paying jobs for its peo- 
ple. And we are determined to 
do a selling job that will result 
in thousands of new jobs in the 
state." 

The governor's new three- 
pronged program calls for : 

1. North Carolina apparel and 
household textiles show at the 
U. S. trade center in Stockholm, 
Oct. 24-29. 

2. A North Carolina trade mis- 
sion which will cover the five 
major European cities of Stock- 



holm, Hamburg, Brussels, Rot- 
terdam, and London. 

3. A North Carolina industrial 
development mission that will 
call on key firms in Sweden, 
Germany, Switzerland, and Eng- 
land to discuss industrial devel- 
opment opportunities in North 
Carolina. 

"There is an excellent mar- 
ket for apparel and household 
textile products of our state in 
the Scandinavian countries," ac- 
cording to officials of the U. S. 
Dept. of Commerce, Governor 
Moore said, "And I hope that 
those firms who have not signed 
up will give urgent attention to 
this opportunity." 

The chief executive pointed out 
that more than 100,000 North 
Carolinians depend on export for 
their livelihood. 



16 



Your 

new symbol for 

banking in the 

growing port cities 




FIRST-CITIZENS BANK 

the Can-Do Bank with the Can-Do People! 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



EXPORTUNITTES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
Edward L. Mercaldo 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh. N. C. 



FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Canning, Preserving Food 

Trinidad — Canned vegetables and fruits for insti- 
tutions, 109 oz. or No. 10 cans, packed 6 cans to case. 
W. B. C. Hillebrand & Co., 27-31 Henry St., Port of 
Spain. 

Grain Mill Products 

Belgium — Prepared feed for animals and cattle. 
Hubrix n.v., 18 St. jansplaats, Kontich near Antwerp. 

Broad Woven Fabric, Manmade Fiber, Silk 

Italy — Fiberglass fabric for covering aircraft. In- 
dart, S.p.A., 11/b Via Ruggero Bonghi, Rome. 

Lumber, Wood Products 

Belgium — Western red cedar, hemlock, Douglas fir. 
Lemahieu Gebroeders n.v., 61 Julien Liebaertlaan, 
Kortrijk. 

Furniture, Fixtures 

Belgium — Metal furniture, racks, shelves, fixtures, 
for hospitals and offices. Ahrend n.v., 12 Lentestraat, 
Antwerp. 

Synthetic Materials 

Belgium — All kinds of synthetic fibers to be woven 
mixed with wood or cotton. Exclusive agency. Es- 
tablissements Leon Delrue S.P.R.L., 118 Rue Auguste 
Reyers, Brussels. 

Philippines — Plastic raw materials. Dante G. San- 
tos, President and General Manager, Philippine Appli- 
ance Corp.. Dr. A. Santos Ave., Paranaque, Rizal. 

Glass, Glassware 

Germany — Household glassware, all kinds. Rastal- 
Werk, W.u.G. Sahm OHG, 541 Hoehr-Grenzhausen, 
Lindenstrasse 18. 

Steel Mill Products 

Philippines — Cold rolled steel sheets; steel tubing. 
Dante G. Santos, President and General Manager, 
Philippine Appliance Corp., Dr. A. Santos Ave., 
Paranaque, Rizal. 

Cutlery, Hand Tools, General Hardware 

Trinidad — All types of hand tools. Lue Choy's Hard- 
ware Store, 16 Saddle Rd., San Juan. 

Fabricated Metal Products 

Belgium — Pipe fittings and valves for all purposes. 
Sobecomin S.A., 20 Rue du Luxembourg, Brussels. 

Farm Machinery 

Belgium — Lawn mowers, all kinds. Ets. Daniel 
Stevens, n.v., 79a Brusselsesteenweg, Ledeberg, Ghent. 



Construction, Mining, Materials Handling 
Machinery 

Finland — Heavy road construction machinery of all 
types, except road graders. Requests brochures, price 
lists, terms. Kone-Tukku Oy, Veneentekijantie 14, 
Helsinki 20, Finland. 

Metalworking Machinery 

Belgium — All kinds of metalworking machine tools, 
cutting tools (except sawing machines, blades) , such as 
lathes, shapers, milling machines. Exclusive agency. 
S.A. Integra, 22 Rue de La Vieille Montagne, Liege. 

Service Industry Machines 

Angola — 1,000-ton-freezer storage at 0° F or under. 
Interested in both plate and blast freezing equipment. 
Capacity desired is to process 10-12 tons of fish a 
day. Also interested in machinery to make 12 tons of 
flake ice per day. Uniao Angolana de Pesca e Industria, 
S.A.R.L., Attn: Mr. J. S. Botha, P. O. Box 11, Cacuaco. 

Electric Transmission, Distribution Equipment 

France — Electronic test equipment, such as micro- 
wave test equipment, high frequency radio testing 
oscilloscopes. Union Radio Import Co., 2 Boulevard 
Pereire, 75-Paris (17). 

Electronic Components, Accessories 

France — Electron tubes, radio and television receiv- 
ing types. Union Radio Import Co., 2 Boulevard 
Pereire, 75—, Paris (17). 

Electrical Machinery, Equipment, Supplies 

Hong Kong — Miniature mercury dry batteries, volt- 
ages from 1.35 to 5.6 volts with current ratings suit- 
able for hearing aids, photoflashes, and key-ring-flash- 
lights. Requests catalogues and c&f prices. Forward 
Trading Co., P. O. Box 2167, Hong Kong. 

Motor Vehicles, Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Australia — Automotive parts and accessories and 
road safety equipment. Denhart Industries Pty. Ltd., 
63 Kingsway, Melbourne, S.C.5, Victoria. 

Ship, Boat Building 

France — Accessories for motor boats. Fenwick S.A., 
Department Marine, 15 Rue Fenelon, Paris, lOe. 
Surgical, Medical, Dental Instruments, 

Safety Devices 

Canada — Inflatable life jackets. British Mercantile 
Co. Ltd., 367 Water St., Vancouver 3, B.C. 

Toys, Amusement, Sporting Goods 

Trinidad — Children's toys and games, all kinds. 
C.A. J. Lashley Co., Ltd., 11 Edward St., Port of Spain. 

Manufacturing Industries 

Finland — Audio-visual teaching devices and equip- 
ment. Requests brochures, price lists, terms. Oy Bell 
Ab, Laajasuontie 16-18 C 24. Helsinki 32. 



18 



North 
Carolina 

Our state's getting to be a big name in international trade, 
and it takes a big bank to keep up. A bank big enough and 
experienced enough to offer North Carolina business and 
industry direct banking and commercial connections 
throughout the world. Backed by total resources of more 
than $825 million and capital funds over $55 million, 
NCNB's International Department serves exporters and 
importers through letters of credit, acceptance financing, 
foreign collections, foreign exchange and remittance of 
funds. Whatever it takes, we're doing our best to meet the 
demands of this fast-moving state. And well we should. 
After all, it's part of our name. 

National 
Bank 

Offices in Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham. Greensboro, High Point. North Wilkesboro. Raleigh. Research Triangle. Statesville. Tarboro, Tryon. Wilmington and Winston-Salem 







WALTER FRIEDERICHS 



su» 



WAREHOUSES: Storage warehouses of 400,000 square 
feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. Bonded ware- 
house space available. Additional 100,000 square foot 
warehouse under construction. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL: Customs Appraisal Service pro- 
vided in modern appraiser warehouse at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tankers; depth 
of 34 feet at mean low water (being deepened to 38 
feet), and supported bv tank farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Transit sheds with 386,000 square 
feet, constructed of steel, concrete and masonry with 
sprinkler and deluge systems (new 120,000 sq. ft. shed 
under construction). 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, open 
ends, consisting of 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, overhead 
bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Ten acres paved open storage, acces- 
sible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, handling both 
truck and rail cars. Certified weightmasters on 24-hour 
duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with crossovers, 
full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks at rear of 
transit sheds and warehouses, entire length. Storage 
yard for 370 freight cars. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

\Y. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf 
is 3,695 feet long with a 50-foot apron. Capacity — seven 
500-foot vessels simultaneously. Channel and turning 
basin depth — 34 feet at mean low water (being deep- 
ened to 38 feet). 

HEAVY EQL'IPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes used 
single or in tandem and equipped for 80-inch magnets 
and 2 and 6-yard bucket operation. One 35-ton locomo- 
tive crane. Four Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts of vari- 
ous sizes and accessories such as cotton clamps, etc. 
Light and heavy tractors and trailers and 5-ton mobile 
crane. Facilities for full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
ramps for easy access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumigation 
plant with two vacuum chambers 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and 
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Companies, and numerous 
highwav motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 







CHARLES McNEILL 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the wharf is 
2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It is capable of 
berthing four 500-foot cargo ships and one petroleum 
tanker, with a depth of 35 feet at mean low water. 
Additional 2 ship berths totaling 1,075 feet under con- 
struction. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 100,000 square 
feet. One constructed of steel, concrete and masonry 
and one of metal. All with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses, totaling 
456,000 square feet, with sprinkle and deluge systems. 
— Total 25 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on ter- 
minal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, full 
length of wharf. Single depressed track full length of 
rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Southern Rail- 
way freight car storage yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with de- 
tachable accessories such as barrel clamps, cotton 
clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for full palletization 
cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 




LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks for 
loading and unloading at transit sheds and warehouses; 
also easy level access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum Cy- 
anide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel 
chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern- A&EC Railway Sys- 
tem and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad and numerous 
highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 






A Facility of 

North Carolina State Ports Authority 

P. O. Box 578 

Southport, N. C. 28461 

Area 919-457-2621 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Booting Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 




H. A. Schmidt 

.Manager 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



WADE H. PIERCE 
Mnnaper — Import Dept. 



L. M. WALLACE 
Manager — Export Dept. 

JESSE C. JACOBS 
Assl. Mgr. — Import Depl. 



Wilmington 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 

Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

Charlotte, N. C. Morehead City, N. C. 




SSL BARBER 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 



New 



GENERAL AGENTS 
York — 1 7 Battery 



Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., P. 0. Box No. 6334 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



cAlo/itd Ca/tofaa Sfuppwg Co. 



STEAMSHIP & FORWARDING AGENTS 

STEVEDORES 
MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



TWX: 919-255-2925 
Phone: 919-726-6173 
P. O. Box 650 



F.M.C. License #1079 
Cable Address 
"Davies" 



TO N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
P. O. BOX 149 
RALEIGH, N. C. 27602 

This is my correct address and zip code. I wish to 
continue the North Carolina State Ports Maga- 
zine. 

Name 

Address 

Zip 



in 



AT ITS BEST ! 




h S * 



New Hanover County, N. C 



Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 




MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



7865 



707 
Years 
Now 



1966 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-S300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondolot Building 

JAckson 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SAraroga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Stroot 
Phon.: 625-4512 



Now York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
WHItohall 4-9120 

F.M.C. Lkenie No. 481 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agent* 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




■MoreAe*^ Qty 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

G. D. Zealand, Executive Director 

Drawer B 9)9-728-31 15 

Beaufort, N. C. Courthouse Annex 



23 



c-d 



mi *'™ 



CARTERET . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 
Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island -Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



24 



J 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
Internationa] Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone R(\ 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Colorcraff of Wilmington. Inc. 

"YOUR KODAK DEALER" 

Photo Processors 



Color Block & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone RO 36263 



119 Market Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 
OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. 0. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 91 9-762-6352 



F M.C. No 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

1211 McCall Street 

Chorlotte, North Carolina 

P. 0. Bon 93 

Atando Station 
Charlotte. N. C. 28286 



Norfolk-Newport News. Va. 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldg. 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member Notionol Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc. 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolino Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADOUAITEIS. TRUCKING IUUDINC. IAIEICH 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Mgr. -Export Dept. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



^u4^k^it 



_> . 



F.M.C. 469 



STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919 255-2989 

Branch Office: Charlotte. N. C. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



IUIK 


RATI 


U. S. 


•ouog. 


PAID 


DaUIgh 


N C. 


Nnrt 


No 33 



HEIDE LAUNCHES 
"OPERATION ATTRACT" 




WHAT REALLY MAKES A PORT ATTRACTIVE TO COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY? 

Strategic geographical location, favorable climate, cooperative labor, excel- 
lent wharves, transit sheds, deep water berths, warehouses and complete 
terminal facilities help make a port desirable. All things considered, however, 
one port is selected over another for the simple reason of greater economy. 

Wilmington and Morehead City are already attractive ports. To assure their 
continued growth agents, stevedores, tug operators, pilots, and line handlers 
realize they must work together to provide rates, port charges and services 
second to none in the United States. 

Increased stevedore production, safer methods of handling cargo, more 
complete agency representation, faster forwarding, simplified documentation, 
expeditious ship turnaround are just a few of the goals for which Heide con- 
tinually strives. We invite and urge all deriving their livelihood from our great 
North Carolina ports to join in "Operation Attract." 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC 



FOUNDED 1869 



(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 
WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • Forwarding Agents • Stevedores 









STDTE PORTS 



■' ■ 



A'%: 



WL&Sb 



!*3lt3 






<*' 



■Bf 



: 




^ 



lA^wi^^MMl 



'63a 



MHHpNP 
4H 



SM5CT 




North 
Carolina 

Our state's getting to be a big name in international trade, 
and it takes a big bank to keep up. A bank big enough and 
experienced enough to offer North Carolina business and 
industry direct banking and commercial connections 
throughout the world. Backed by total resources of more 
than $825 million and capital funds over $55 million, 
NCNB's International Department serves exporters and 
importers through letters of credit, acceptance financing, 
foreign collections, foreign exchange and remittance of 
funds. Whatever it takes, we're doing our best to meet the 
demands of this fast-moving state. And well we should. 
After all, it's part of our name. 

National 
Bank 

Offices in Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Research Triangle, Statesville, Tarboro, Tryon, Wilmington and Winston-Salem 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 22 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad .. 24 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County 23 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. 24 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank & Trust Co. 21 

Glasgow Hicks Co. 1 

Heide Company, Inc.-Luckenbach Back Cover 

Heide Company, Inc. 1 

Hi-Page Co. Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line .-23 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. .. ....23 

New Hanover County 22 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co. 22 

North Carolina National Bank Inside Front Cover 

Southern Railway System .. 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 19 

Walker Taylor Insurance 24 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc. 23 

Wilmington Shipping Co. .. 22 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc 23 




: -'• vkV-^V- : * ';'- : .".r^tf""*^ 



If you're looking for a "sure thing" when 
you're shipping to, from or within the 
South, give Southern the haul. We take 
the gamble out of transportation. Try 
us next time and see for yourself. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 



MARINE INSURANCE 



509 MURCHISON HUILDING 



PHONE 762-180C 



P. O. BOX 1678 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Heide Company, Inc. 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS ■ STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

PO Box 232 Tel (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



REEVES RETIRES; 
RICHARDS ELEVATED 




Photo — Roy Hardee, N&O 
(L. TO R.) E. N. RICHARDS OF RALEIGH, JOHN M. REEVES OF PINEHURST, HENRY L. WEATHERS OF SHELBY. 



E. N. Richards, previously Vice-Chairman of the 
Authority, who has served as a member since 1961, 
in his third year of a six-year term beginning in 
1963, was elected Chairman to succeed Reeves. Henry 
L. Weathers was elected Vice-Chairman. Weathers 
was appointed to the Board by Governor Moore in 
July, 1965. J. O. Foil of Greensboro, whose term ex- 
pires in 1967, continues on the Executive Committee. 



On September 19th, in Washington, N. C, (the 
original Washington in the United States), Governor 
Dan K. Moore and the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority accepted, with regret, the resignation of 
John M. Reeves as Chairman of the Ports Authority. 
(Mr. Reeves letter and the Governor's reply are 
reprinted below). 

The Honorable Dan K. Moore 
Governor of North Carolina 
Raleigh, North Carolina 
Dear Governor Moore: 

With deep regret it has become necessary for me 
to tender my resignation as Chairman of the North 
Carolina Ports Authority, effective this date. 

When your illustrious predecessor, Governor 
Hodges, appointed me in 1957, I did not realize what 
a great experience was in store or that I would 
be involved for as long a period as these nine years. 
However, I take great pride in our accomplishments 
during this period. 

Congratulations on your choice of appointment of 
the three most recent members to the Ports Author- 
ity. They have added a great deal to our group and 
have indeed been a pleasure to work with. 

My experience with the members of the Authority 
and the entire staff has been most satisfactory, and 
I feel confident that this branch of North Carolina 
Government is in excellent hands. 

Sincerely, 
John M. Reeves 
2 

— AT PRESS TIME — 

On October 14, Governor Moore announced appointment of Asheville Attorney V. Lamar Gudger, Jr., 47, as a member 
of the State Ports Authority to succeed John M. Reeves of Pinehurst, who has resigned. Gudger will serve the re- 
mainder of the term expiring June 30, 1969. (Picture & Biography will appear in January issue) 



Governor Moore sent the following telegram to 
Mr. Reeves upon receipt of the letter announcing his 
resignation : 



"It is with sincere regret that I learn of your 
resignation as Chairman of the North Carolina 
Ports Authority. Under your leadership our ports 
facilities have become a major stimulus to the 
economy of North Carolina. I am sure the impetus 
of your initiative and dedication will be a guiding 
factor in the continued development of these 
facilities for years to come. All North Carolinians 
join me in thanking you for a job well done." 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 
ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonvffle 
WILLIAM B. GLENN, Greenville 
V. LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
JOSEPH EOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 

HENRY LEE WEATHERS, Shelby, V. Chairman 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE PORTS 



k WILMINGTON OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION 
JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce ir Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

HUGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



FALL ISSUE, 1966, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 12, NO. 8 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PArfc 6-3158 

TWX 919 255-2995 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON. Tobacco Supt. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 
P. O. Box 3037-28403 
Tel. 919 ROger 3-1621 

TWX 919 762-5661 
W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Advisory Budget Commission Visits Terminals 4 

Alcoa Exports Ingots 5 

Mrs. Moss Retires 5 

North Carolina Highway Map 6-7 

Coastal Historyland Map 8-9 

Swedish Cargo Discharged at Wilmington 10 

Do's and Dont's from Bureau of Customs 15 

Morehead Expands Tobacco Exports 16 

N. C. Motor Carriers 17 

Exportunities 18 

U. S. Expects Gain in Exports to Sweden 20 



COVER STORY 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwIing Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box I 19-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE. Director Public Relations 



STATE PORTS 



*. 




The cover illustrates the need for 
trunk east-west highways in North 
Carolina. The porthole is taken from 
a ship in berth at Morehead City. The 
mountain scene in the opening of the 
port hole is a section of Interstate 40 
in McDowell County in North Caro- 
lina's Blue Ridge Mountains. Eighty 
percent of the shippers using the 
North Carolina ports lie west of Ral- 
eigh, the State Capitol. 

On the center page, there is a V ik- 
ing Ship, and the words in Swedish 
saying "Ports of North Carolina." 
This is in four-color and was repro- 
duced from a previous issue of the 
State Ports Magazine. (See story on 
Sweden, Page 10). 







I 



r \ 




ADVISORY 

BUDGET 

COMMISSION 

VISITS 

TERMINALS 



SECO— Photo 



(L. TO R.) GOVERNOR MOORE AND CHAIRMAN OF THE AD- 
VISORY BUDGET COMMISSION, TOM WHITE, LOOK AT PORT 
TERMINAL MAP. 



BUSY DOCK SCENE AT WILMINGTON STATE PORT TERMINAL. 



Photo — Pat Ol 







ALCOA EXPORTS INGOTS 




'*1J. '>V 

Fifty tons of aluminum ingots from Aluminum Company of America's plant at Badin, N. C, 
were loaded aboard the Hasselburg Tuesday at Morehead City port for shipment to northern Eu- 
rope. This is the first such shipment through Morehead City, a cargo long sought by port person- 
nel. (PhotO by Walter Phillips) CARTERET County News-Times 



Mrs. Una Home Moss Retires 

Mrs. Moss, who prior to September 17, 1966 was 
Mrs. Lina Home, is leaving the employment of the 
North Carolina State Ports Authority October 31, 
1966. She has set a record, in that for this relatively 
new and growing agency of the State, she is the 
first person to go on State retirement directly from 
Authority employment. 

"Lina" as she is affectionately known to all, was 
employed by Roberts & Company, Architects and 
Engineers for the original Ports Authority con- 
struction in Wilmington, in October 1950 and served 
as Secretary to the Resident Engineer. In 1952, this 
job having terminated, she was employed by J. W. 
Hunter Construction Company, which company con- 
structed the Transit Sheds 1 and 2. 

Following that employment, she transferred to the 
Ports Authority in 1953 performing work in several 
different offices, and finally settling in the Comptrol- 
ler's office in 1954 as Secretary to the Comptroller. 
She held this position until her retirement and win 
have the lasting satisfaction of having seen the Ports 




Authority grow in physical size and in service to the 
State of North Carolina. 

It is with regret that we see this fine colleague leave 
us, and we use this opportunity to wish her the best 
in health and happiness, from all of us who have 
worked with her. 




In the previous issue of this publication the center spread contained a survey map of 
North Carolina dated 1808, with the offer that the State Ports Authority would furnish a 
full size reproduction suitable for framing, upon request. 

The response to this offer resulted in the distribution of over five hundred of these maps. 
Many of the requests have come from far away places. 

The publication has a circulation of ten thousand copies and is distributed in forty-eight 
countries. The majority of the distribution, of course, is in North Carolina. 

Having proved to ourselves that our readers like maps, we are, now, presenting two more. 
Here is a black and white reproduction of the annual publication by the North Carolina 
Highway Commission in full color. This map is available upon request at most any Highway 




Commission Office; at the N. C. State Port Terminal Offices; at highway rest-stations, and 
many Chambers of Commerce Information Desks. It contains valuable information to the 
traveler and the student of North Carolina Geography. 

On Pages 8 and 9 following, is a reproduction of a guide to Coastal Historyland North 
Carolina. This map, in limited supply, is available in most of the thirty-five counties east of 
1-95 and in the Department of Conservation & Development, Travel Information Division; at 
Tryon Palace in New Bern, and the Ports Authority Office in Raleigh. 

The tie in of the Ports with Highways and History of North Carolina is obvious to many, 
but is often taken for granted and over looked by most. 






GJuastal Mistnrylanii -X'lirtli (Carolina 



■ 



17 









■ 


t 8 

■ 


- 


■ 


- 


- 


- 

■ 


19 

■ 









I • 



■ 

- 









■ 



■ 

■ ■ 

■ 

■ 
■ 

■ 
■ 

■ 

- 

■ 

■ 
■ 

- 

■ 
■ 

I 

■ 
■ 

■ 

■ 

■ 



■ 



- 

- 

■ 
■ ■ 






■ 

■ 
■ 
■ 

. ■ ■ ■ ■ . 1 . 

' ■ - 
20. 

■ ■ 

- 

■ - 

21 

■ 

■ 



■ 






■ 








.■ 










23 






■ 






■ ■ 










■ 


■ 




■ 














• . 






■ . 






24 




■ 












■ 







■ 
■ 

■ 
■ ■ 



25. 


■ 












■ 


. 


. 




■ 



f . ■ ■ ■ 

26 

. . . 

■ 
27 












■ 

■ 
■ 












■ 
■ 

- 







30 

■ 
■ 

■ 
■ 

■ ■ 
■ 

■ 
■ 

31 

■ 

■ 
■ 



■ 

32 

- 

■ 

■ 
■ 

. - 
■ 

■ 

■ 
■ - 

• ■ 
■ 






^2i . 







if: . ■*■; ' 



[it 

■ 

■ 



>0!" Hil OI!l 



SWEDISH CARGO 

On September 13, the S/S KRAGEHOLM, 3,887 
gross tons, Swedish American Lines, Captain Niels 
Lindquist, Master, discharged cargo from Stockholm, 
and Gothenburg, Sweden, Kotka, Finland and Hull, 
England, making Wilmington her first port of dis- 
charge in the United States. 

Among other items, she carried steel tubing 
blanks, shown in pictures inside the transit shed 
and on the dock, destined for S K F Industries, Inc., 
Asheville, North Carolina, where these blanks are 
turned into railway and other types of roller bear- 
ings. This is the third importation of this raw 
material through Wilmington for the American 
Branch of the Swedish S K F Industries. Until 
recently these tubing blanks were being imported 
through more Northern ports. Other steel stock for 
manufacturing bearings, loaded at Gothenburg, was 
also discharged for delivery to S K F, Asheville. 

The vessel also discharged plywood from Kotka, 
Finland, and Machinery from Hull, England. 

Unfortunately, drizzling weather prevented good 
photographs. One photograph showing Swedish 
American emblem on stack with Blue Peter Flag 
flying from signal halliard above stack may illustrate 
the Swedish theme. She started discharging at 0800 
and sailed at 1700 the same day. 

The vessel also carried 6 passengers, four of whom 
left the vessel at Wilmington. The other two, a 
mother and daughter, were bound to join the father 
of the family at Veracruz, Mexico. 

Walter H. Friederichs 






PORTS AUTHORITY TO SWEDEN 

Chairman E. N. Richards and Mrs. 
Richards, Member F. H. Ross, Jr. of Char- 
lotte and Mrs. Ross, while visiting in 
Europe will be present in Stockholm, 
Sweden during the North Carolina Wear- 
ing Apparel Show at the U. S. Dept. of 
Commerce Trade Center, October 24-29. 

E. E. Lee, Jr. of N. C. State Ports' 
administrative staff will also be in Stock- 
holm at the textile show. Lee will repre- 
sent the Ports Authority as Director of 
Commerce, on the Trade Mission to nine 
countries with Ed Mercaldo, Export Co- 
ordinator of C & D as mission leader. 

While in Stockholm at the textile show 
Lee will be present at the N. C. Ports 
Authority display in the lobby of the 
U. S. Trade Center and adjacent to the 
Travel Information Booth of C & D. 

The next four pages will be used as a 
leaflet for information about the State 
Port Terminals. 

The Public Relations section of the 
Ports Authority has prepared a slide 
series in four colors which will be shown 
continously in the booth. In addition, 
using the photography of Hugh Morton, 
and Pete Knight, two large four-color 
reproductions of the port terminals at 
Morehead City and Wilmington will flank 
the slide show. 

The Trade Mission will end in London 
on November 14, where Governor Moore 
and his party, vacationing in Europe, will 
join them, as will the Travel Mission 
which tours Europe at the same times. 



THE BLACK DIAMOND LINES SS BLACK FALCON FLYING 
THE FLAG OF NORWAY WAS IN PORT AT MOREHEAD CITY 
ONE FINE DAY IN AUGUST. SHE WAS LOADING CARGO 
FOR NORTHERN EUROPE. WE MET CAPTAIN OSVALD L. 
HALVORSEN WHO LIVES IN OSLO. WE TOLD HIM ABOUT 
THE SCANDANAVIAN VISIT OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
TEAM IN OCTOBER. * 



9CoVtA Cahfifaax, 



Fall 1966 



\ 





















*£%^ 



POSlDi 




STATE PORT TERMINAL. 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



FRIEDERICHS 



WAREHOUSES: Storage warehouses of 400,000 
square feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
Bonded warehouse space available. Additional 
100,000 square foot warehouse under construc- 
tion. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL : Customs Appraisal Ser- 
vice provided in modern appraiser warehouse 
at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tank- 
ers ; depth of 34 feet at mean low water (being 
deepened to 38 feet), and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Transit sheds with 506,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, 
open ends, 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, over- 
head bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE : Ten acres paved open storage, 
accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, hand- 
ling both truck and rail cars. Certified weight- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs, full length of wharf apron. Depressed 
tracks at rear of transit sheds and warehouses, 
entire length. Storage yard for 370 freight cars. 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 3,695 feet long with a 50-foot apron. 
Capacity — seven 500-foot vessels simultane- 
ously. Channel and turning basin depth — 34 
feet at mean low water (being deepened to 38 
feet). 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry 
cranes used single or in tandem and equipped 
for 80-inch magnets and 2 and 6-yard bucket 
operation. One 35-ton locomotive crane. Four 
Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
of various sizes and accessories such as cotton 
clamps, etc. Light and heavy tractors and 
trailers and 5-ton mobile crane. Facilities for 
full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; ramps for easy access into 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumi- 
gation plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road and Seaboard Air Line Railroad Com- 
panies and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



STEAMSHIP SERVICES AVAILABLE AT WILMINGTON STATE PORT TERMINAL TO AND FROM 
NORTHERN EUROPE: 



Finnlines 
Head Line 
Manchester Lines 
Ozean/Stinnes Lines 



Scandinavian American Line 
Swedish American Line 
United States Lines 




McNeill 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 






WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships 
and one petroleum tanker, with a depth of 35 
feet at mean low water. Additional 2 ship 
berths totaling 1,075 feet under construction. 

TRANSIT SHEDS : Two transit sheds of 100,000 
square feet. One constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry and one of metal. All with sprink- 
ler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses, total- 
ing 456,000 square feet, with sprinkle and de- 
luge systems. — Total 25 fire segregation sec- 
tions. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available 
on terminal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
over, full length of wharf. Single depressed 



track full length of rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Southern Railway freight car 
storage yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
with detachable accessories such as barrel 
clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for 
full palletization cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; also easy access into transit 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest va- 
cuum Cyanide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 
cubic foot steel chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern- A&EC Rail- 
way System and the Beaufort-Morehead Rail- 
road and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



STEAMSHIP SERVICES 
NORTHERN EUROPE: 



AVAILABLE AT MOREHEAD CITY STATE PORT TERMINAL TO AND FROM 



Belgian Lines 
Black Diamond Lines 
Holland America Line 
Manchester Lines 



North German Lloyd/ Hamburg American Lines— joint service 
Ozean/Stinnes Lines 
United States Lines 






■;!'■ 



■%*'" 



fcw ^^S^s^: .;W^ . : -^ffi»*Bfr%n- 



^-- y ^^^■'^'■■'■■^'•Bmfcv^—* 






P?P*^ :: '^w - 






■,■"-■':,". 

■ : ■:-... 






Ka^iMi^-" 



^*™^m»«^ 










your cargo is headed for the midwest U.S.A., head for North Carolina ports 



Dm Europe to the midwest U.S.A., often the quickest route is 
rough North Carolina State Ports. 

Closer to most midwestern markets than any other deep water 
irt on the Atlantic, State Port Terminals at Wilmington and 
orehead City are equipped for fast cargo handling to and 
>m much of eastern U.S.A. 



In addition to this closeness to major U.S. markets, N. C. Port 
offer other important advantages: no delay laying in the strea; 
waiting for a berth . . . fast turn around . . . immediate dock-sic t 
rail and truck service . . . pilferage and cargo damage are n 

The name of the game is efficiency. Fast, experienced can]; 
handling is the way it's played at North Carolina State Por! ! 



For full cargo information, contact 
EXECUTIVE OFFICES AND OPERATIONS 
P. O. Box 3037, Wilmington, North Carolina 28403 
Phone (919) 763-1621, TWX: 919-762-5661 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 
PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE 
Box 149, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602 
Phone (919) 829-3855 



OPERATIONS 

P. O. Box 648, Morehead City, North Carolina 28557 

Phone (919) 726-3158 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

26 Broadway, Suite 767, New York, New York 10007 

Phone (212) 269-1843 



North Carolina Ports 






__— ~--~-— 








1 ZcVSTo 




l^H . ip. I; u 


• 








^^^ 







///W States Customs 






DO'S and DON'TS 



read Customs Hints . Know your Customs rules. 

get Customs information from Customs officials. 

declare every article acquired abroad and accompanying 
you, including gifts. 

keep a record of all acquired items. Save sales invoices. 
Convert prices to U.S. currency to save time. 

pack your purchases and gifts in one piece of luggage. 

have all your baggage ready for inspection. 

know your State as well as Federal liquor restrictions. 

understand every country insists upon a thorough customs 
examination for returning residents. 

realize we want to help you clear Customs quickly. 

understand we appreciate your patience. Remember, 
Customs inspectors have a difficult task to fulfill. 



exceed your customs exemption without expecting to 
pay duty. 

forget your purchases sent home are subject to duty. 

be surprised if we open all your luggage. 

forget all accompanying foreign purchases must be 
declared, even those you have worn or used. 

accept the offer of a "false" sales invoice. This could 
result in seizures and penalties. 

rely on the "experienced" traveler, or foreign seller for 
your customs information. 

bring back lottery tickets. 

bring back fruits, plants, vegetables or meat without 
permits or advice from the Department of Agriculture. 

bring back gold coins, gold medals, or gold-coin jewelry 
without obtaining U.S. Treasury authorization. 



i 5 NSP@eTiorvf 








BUREAU OF CUSTOMS / WASHINGTON, D.C. 20226 



Morehead Expands Tobacco Exports 



Ml 




<>W6B 




EXPANDING PORT — This thousand -foot at left is 75 feet from top to bottom. Over a 
fill and sheet piliiip will support dotkinp facilities thousand wood pilings will be driven into the area, 
to expand the Morehead State Port. The steel piling ISECO Photo) 







PONDER BIDDING — Four construction ex- 
ecutives ponder the bidding after bids' were opened 
in the Morehead city hall last week for the §10 
million bulk loading facility at the port. From the 
left are Herschel Williams, Greenville; Jim Gold- 
smith, Washington, N. C; Gene McWatty and Bill 
Hinton, Wilmington. (SECO Photo) 

Bj LESLIE GRUBEK Expansion has followed. 

Regional Editor Currently, the port b building 

MOREHEAD CITY — North additional berthing space and 
Carolina products most of the additional transit and ware- 
nation's flue - cured tobacco house space. Prospects for 
and today 3o per cent of all continued cargo increases are- 
flue - cured tobacco exports good. 

Soon, ■ the largest single 
project in the State ^ports' his- 
tory, the huge bulk 'handling 
facility will be built at a cost 
of about $10 million. 

Due to t h e 12S million 
poitids-a-year tobacco export 
movement through the More- 
head City port, expanded fa- 
cilities for both tobacco and 
general cargo became aeces- 



THOrSANDS OF POUNDS — Thousands of 
pounds of tobacco are stored in hogsheads like these 
in the transit sheds and warehouses of the More- 
head State port. This tobacco has all been previous- 
ly purchased by foreign companies, run through the 
redrying plants, packed in hogsheads and moved 
to the port to await shipment. (SECO Photo) 
and on buildings to provide Now under construction Is 
acres of space. the west dock extension of 1.- 

075 feet that will berth t w o 
additional ocean going ships, a . 
120.000 square foot transit 
shed and a 100,000 square foot 



LOADING OUT — Hogsheads of tobacco, each 
weighing a gross 1,100 pounds, are slung aboard a 
German freighter for shipment to Europe from 
from Morehead City was 14 uary. 

per cent greater than in 1964. Edmundson said So per cent 
However, U. S. tobacco ex- of the tobacco purchased for 
port was down nine per cent the Japanese Tobacco Mono- 



Morehead's state port. The port moved 128 million 
pounds of tobacco last year, 14 per cent more than 
in 1%4. (SECO Photo) 



The work also bidod.es 

dredging harbor facilities. 
In the process of dredging 



trij 



of I 



The port at Morehead tjiy 
h..- become (he specialized 
tobacco port. In the last two 
or three years Morehead 
Oty has become a major 
tobacco exporting center, 
cutting Into the business of 
the traditional tobacco porta 
of Newport News and Nor- 
folk, Va. 



ill be created at the 
edge of the present port 
which also is built largely 
on filled land. The dredsing 
is bringing up many "key" 
shells which are ghen visi- 



The mixture of sand and 
she'.l at the bottom of the 
bay here makes good, solid 
fill material, Charles McNeill 
operations manager of the 




The pre - formed cement 
walls, roof and steel frame- 
work of the newer buildings 
at the Morehead port provide 
favorable facilities for tobac- 
co movement. J. R. Edmund- 
son, tobacco superintendent, 
pointed out. 

Additional storage building 
is planned for the near future. 

Edmundson said 64,000 
tons of tobacco moved 
through the Morehead port 
last year. The 19CG move- 
ment promises an 13 per 
cent increase over that fig- 
Tobacco sh I p m e n t s from 
this port have mounted stead- 
ily since one ship took out 3,- 
000 hogsheads or 1,500 tons 
of leaf in 1952. In 1953. the 
second year of operations two 
shiDS took out 6,000 hogsheads. 
During 1965 124 ships took 
out 127.000 hogsheads. The 
port berthed 332 ships in 1965. 
The 1965 tobacco movement 



from' 1964. 

U. S. tobacco exports in 1965 
were 46S million pounds. 

The Morehead City port 
moved 128 million pounds or 
27.3 per cent of this total. The 
percentage for this year will 
be higher, Edmundson be- 

Relocation of major tobac- 
co processing facilities in east- 
ern North Carolina from Vir- bacco going 
and other areas of the Egypt 



through the por 
The Monopoly has 15 sup- 
pliers, the official said Twelve 
of the 15 ship tobacco out 
of here. The Japanese Mono- 
poly maintains an office in 
Raleigh, headed at present by 



"There Is about S70 mil- 
lion worth of tobac c o 
port," the manager de- 
clared. 



the 






. Ttaa 



Nagas 



. The 



tobat 



The additional storage 
space both proposed and 
building here will enable the 
tobacco. 



moved 40,000 hogsh i 
through here last year. 
Virtually all the U. S. to- 
Thailand and 
through the 



This 



region is helping the Morehead port. 
d increase, the offi- Huge piles of hogsheads, 
cated. each holding 90o to a thou- 

sand pounds of tobacco fill 
warehouses here. "We have 
about 55,000 hogsheads in stor- 
age, "McNeill said. He s a i d 
there were 75,000 hogsheads 



.■.,ii , 



the 



port tonnage from the port. 

Foreign buyers like to store 
their tobacco at Morehead, 
Edmundson said, due to cli- 
matic conditions and the 
kind of facilities and 
provided tfor fees oi 
which means profitable opera- 
the port and the 
state). Some people, like the 
Japanese, he added, move 
their tobacco out within a few 
months, others, like the Ger- 
mans, tend to leave it in stor- 
age for a long period, Japa- 
nese ship most of their to- 
bacco in December and Jan.- 



i the trai 
shipment. 









tobacco can be loaded i 
raigated. and loaded out In 
less than five hours. 

The port employs about 75 
persons regularly. Stevedor- 
ing firms have about 200 
longshoremen available. Many 
if not most of these are part- 
timc fishermen and farmers 
who supplement their income 
at the dockside. 
aming into the In addition to these peo- 
now, as redry- pie, there are several ship- 
e in and pro ping agencies and the oil 
t crop. "Every docks at Morehead. The port 
have 40 or 50 also serves as an erobarka- 
waiting to un- tion point for the U. S. Ma- 
load tobacco and they keep rine Corps establishments at 
coming all d a y," McNeill Camp Lejeune and Cherry 
said. Point. 

One of the port's favored Thus, from a small begin- 
fealures is its new, highly of- ning, the port here has ef- 
ficient fumigation chamber, come a major factor in com- 
ind employment. 



Most ships take only part- 
carcoes, a thousand or two or 
three at the most, due to in- 
surance regulations and dan- 
ger of cargo damage, port of- 
ficials said. The Japanese, 
they added, tend to take larg- 
er loads, sometimes shiploads 

Tobacco is coming into the 
port in volume now, as redry- 



morning 



double ehai 



SUNDAV/STAR-NEWS/ 
L J*£m&h£4£/ 

WILMINGTON. N. C. 

SEPTEMBER 25, 1966 

SECTIOND 

SECO PHOTOS BY GRUBER 





16 



NEW BILK LOADING FACILITY — This North Carolina. Cost of the construction is 

engineer's drawin/ illustrates the huge bulk terminal mated at about flO million. Work involved in t 

at Morehead State Port for which bids are now project is shown in white. The bridge is the Mo 

under study after Thursday's bid opening at the head-Beaufort structure. The Newport River is 

Morehead City Hall by officials of the state of the foreground. 



MOREHEAD PORT — The aerial view shev 
the Morehead State Port as it appeared early 
the summer. The new west dock and storage a i 
pansion which doesn't appear in the photo is < 



the left. Nearly 'nine acres of ground" is being made 
i,v t*e Hred-'imr lor the herthing facilities. The hulk 
loading facility will go along the dock at right where 
two ships are moored. (Simpson Aerial Photo) 



ASHEVILLE, N. C, SEPT. 14— Marvin B. Koonce, 
Jr. of Raleigh, has been elected president of the 
9000 member North Carolina Motor Carriers As- 
sociation. 

Mr. Koonce, secretary of the Carolina Storage and 



Distributing Company, president of the Southeastern 
Bonded Refrigerated Warehouse, former State Pres- 
ident of the N. C. Junior Chamber of Commerce, 
succeeded D. W. Royster of Shelby. 




(L. TO R.) READY FOR ACTION— NEW OFFICERS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSOCIATION ELECTED DUR- 
ING' THE ANNUAL CONVENTION IN ASHEVILLE AT THE JACK TAR GROVE PARK INN ARE: PRES., MARVIN B. KOONCE. JR. 
CAROLINA STORAGE AND DISTRIBUTING CO., RALEIGH; 1ST V-PRES., WM. L. NAHRGANG. JOHNSON MOTOR LINES, CHAR- 
LOTTE: 2ND V-PRES., T. BRAGG MCLEOD, MOSS TRUCKING CO., CHARLOTTE; EXEC. V-PRES., J. T. OUTLAW, RALEIGH; AND 
STATE V-PRES. TO ATA, R. Y. SHARPE, PILOT FREIGHT CARRIERS, INC., WINSTON-SALEM. NCMC Ph 



— AT PRESS TIME — 

On November 17, in Hickory, the North Carolina World Trade As- 
sociation will hold the second of four Regional Conferences. 

The first was in Raleigh in early September, and on that same day 
the Board of Directors of the Association met and all the standing 
committees reported. 

Firms and individuals who are involved, or who are becoming in- 
volved with international trade, find that information acquired and 
distributed at these conferences can be money-saving and profitable. 

At press time. Leon Moody of Charlotte, President of the NCWTA, 
invites all North Carolina international traders, whether they are 
members or not, to attend this Hickory meeting in November. 

The REEC will hold a meeting at 3 :00 p.m. in Hickory that same day. 



NEWSPRINT AT WILMINGTON BOUND FOR WINSTON-SALEM 
JOURNAL AND SENTINEL. SHIPMENT HANDLED BY MCLEAN 
TRUCKING CO. PORTION OF A 579 ROLL (1,137,386 POUNDS) 
SHIPMENT. 



WS-Journal Photo 



GIANT VENEER LOGS ON WAY TO EUROPE. WHILE IN THE 
DISTANCE THE DREDGE CONTINUES TO FILL AT MOREHEAD 
CITY TERMINAL, ENLARGING THE AREA FOR NEW TRANSIT 
SHED AND TWO NEW BERTHS (ABOUT 1100 FT.) THE TURN- 
ING BASIN IS 35 FT. MLW. 




' 'Y HUB 







EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
Edward L. Mercaldo 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Canning, Preserving Food 

Belgium — Canned foods and drinks. J. P. Munar 
Sulccrs. N.V., 6 Kanonstraat, Antwerp. 

Philippines — Canned food products: U.S. specialties, 
all kinds. N. Tanpua & Sons Development Corpora- 
tion, Nastodeco, c/o Mr. Philip B. Tanpua, Vice Presi- 
dent & Marketing Director, Governor Lim Ave., Zam- 
boanga City. 

Textile Mill Products 

Austria — Textile materials, particularly novelty fab. 
rics, for garment manufacturing and for sale in de- 
partment store. Stafa-Kaufhaus Ges.m.b.H., Postfach 
112, A-1072 Vienna. 

Germany — Fabrics, broad woven: woolen, worsted 
and cotton for the manufacture of men's and boys' 
coats and suits. Requests price quotations cif Ham- 
burg or Bremen. Adolf Ahlers Bekleidungswerke 
G.m.b.H., 49 Herford-Elverdissen. 

Men's, Youths', Boys' Furnishings 

Nigeria — Men's sportswear. Olatunde Abijah Ramos 
& Sons, 23 Abina St. Suru-Lere, Yaba, Lagos. 

Women's, Misses', Juniors' Outerwear 

Nigeria — Women's sportswear. Olatunde Abijah 
Ramos & Sons, 23 Abina St., Suru-Lere, Yaba, Lagos. 

Women's, Misses', Children's, Infant's Under 
Garments 

Sweden — Medium, low-priced nylon underwear for 
women. Swedish Trading Agencies, 3 Ovre Djupedals- 
gatan, Goteborg. 



Logging Camps, Logging Contractors 

Netherlands — Timber (pine). N.V. Leidse 
Import Mij., 375 Hoge Rijndijk, Leiderdorp. 



Hout 



Building Paper, Building Board Mills 

Philip-pines — Low-priced acoustical boards. Luis 
Campos, President, Campos Rueda & Sons, Inc., Tin- 
dalo St., Makati, Rizal; Box 31, Manila. 

Heating Apparatus, Plumbing Fixtures 

Belgium — Radiators, related equipment. Werkhuizen 
Remi Claeys Superia, 124 Torhoutsesteenweg, Zedel- 
gem. 



Germany — Gas heating equipment accessories. 
Afriso-Werk, 7129 Gueglingen/Wuertt., Stromberg- 
strasse 20. 

Philippines — Plumbing supplies. Jose Elpidio 0. 
Isip, Proprietor & General Manager, E. 0. Isip Enter- 
prises, 412 Protacio, Pasay City. 

Screw Machine Products 

Pakistan — Machine screws for use in stainless steel 
surgical instruments manufacture. Globe Surgical In- 
dustry, College Road, Sialkot, West. 

Farm Machinery 

Philippines — Tractors, low power, medium size or 
portable; cultivators; tynes; irrigation equipment. 
N. Tanpua & Sons Development Corp., NASTODECO, 
c/o Philip B. Tanpua, Vice Pres. & Marketing Direc- 
tor, Governor Lim Ave., Zamboanga City. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Brazil — Spindles, shuttles, combs, felt, springs, 
travelers, gears, needles, other accessories, parts for 
textile industry machinery. Bratex S. A. Comercio de 
Maquinas e Accessorios para Industria Caixa Postal 
5247 Sao Paulo. 

Philippines — Sawmill and woodworking machinery; 
wood treating plants. Francisco Buenaseda Jr., Gen- 
eral Manager, Buenaseda Trading, 401 AIU Bldg., 
Juan Luna St., Box 3493, Manila. 

Philippines — Machinery equipment, tools, mill sup- 
plies used in the logging, lumber, veneer, plywood, and 
wood industries. Clemente Llenado, President, Oregon 
Trading Corp., 706 Harrison Blvd., Box 2230, Manila. 

Service Industry Machines 

Italy — Industrial laundry equipment, industrial re- 
frigeration machinery and equipment, large-size elec- 
tric equipment. Astrel del Dr. Mario Sciuto, 104 Viale 
Mario Repisardi, Catania. 

Motor Vehicles, Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Kuwait — Refrigerated van bodies of moderate size, 
for transporting beef and lamb carcasses, mounted 
on Chevrolet chassis. Safwan Trading & Contracting 
Enterprises, P. O. Box 1521, Kuwait. 

Surgical, Medical, Dental Instruments 

Switzerland — Electro-medical, surgical equipment, 
apparatus ; electronic devices, all types. F. Brunner, 
Consultant Engineer, Oerlikonerstrasse 35, 8057 
Zurich. 



18 



^ 




f / 



- 



Before you ride off in all directions... 
talk to a Wachovia International Specialist. 



Doing business abroad can be frustrating. But it 
doesn't have to be. 

You can let a Wachovia International Specialist 
smooth the way for you. His fingers are on the eco- 
nomic pulse of six continents. He can assist you in 
buying or selling in every major world market. You 
can also turn to Wachovia's International Department 
for trade leads, credit reports, untangling exchange 
regulations, acceptance financing, letters of credit, 
collection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 
So, before you take off in all directions, talk to 
Wachovia. 



INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT 



BANK &> TRUST COMPANY 



Sweden 



Growing demand for industrial equipment 
will cause significant U.S. export gains 

By HAROLD A. McNITT 

European Division, BIC 

Spurred by an increasing demand for capital equipment, 
U.S. exports to Sweden are expected to make significant gains 
this year. 

The current surge in spending in Sweden for industrial 
machinery comes at a time when many Swedish industries 
have reached near-capacity output levels. The overall growth 
rate of the economy in 1966 will be restrained by a severe 
labor shortage in several industries combined with a general 
tightening of credit availability. In addition, world market 
prices for some of Sweden's major exports, particularly wood 
pulp and iron ore, have softened in recent months. 




Sweden's Imports, 1965 

Total imports $4,378 millioi 

From U.S. $ 415 millioi 

U.S. share 10% 

Sweden's Exports, 1965 

Total exports $3,973 millioi 

To U.S. $ 238 millioi 

U.S. share 6% 



Sweden's chief imports from the U.S.: 

Machinery, automobiles, chemicals and plastics, metals 
fruit, fuels, textiles and wearing apparel, instruments, oili 
and fats. 

Sweden's chief exports to the U.S.: 

Machinery, automobiles, iron and steel, pulp, nonferroua 
metals, manufactured articles, furs, paper and paperboard 1 



In view of these factors, a moderate 
increase of 3.5% has been projected for 
the Gross National Product (GNP) this 
year. The GNP reached $20.7 billion in 
1965, a gain of 3% at constant prices 
over the previous year. 

Business confidence in the long-term 
future of the economy is reflected in the 
current steep rise of private investment 
expenditures. The Government estimates 
that private capital outlays will increase 
by about 13% in 1966. Approximately 
two-thirds of these expenditures will go 
into new machinery to modernize indus- 
trial facilities. This trend began in 1965, 
when nearly $1 billion was spent by 
private industry for capital improvements. 
By installing labor-saving machinery and 
improving productive efficiency, major 
industries hope to maintain prices that 
will be competitive on the world market. 

A need to stabilize prices is widely 
recognized here. The consumer price 
index jumped 8% between March, 1965, 
and last March; the wholesale price index 
advanced 3.5% during the same period. 
Monetary and fiscal measures are being 
vigorously employed to restrain the up- 
ward drift. As part of this program, the 
Central Bank recently announced an in- 
crease in the rediscount rate from 5.5% 
to 6%. 

Stimulated by sustained prosperous 
conditions, trade reached record levels in 
1965. Imports for the year totalled $4,378 
million (c.i.f. value), up 14% from the 
previous year. Imports from the U.S. 
were valued at $415 million, an 8% in- 
crease. 

Imports of U.S. industrial products 
scored striking advances. Impressive 
gains were achieved in purchases of U.S. 
machinery (up 21% from 1964); trans- 



port equipment (up 38% ); chemicals (up 
10%); and instruments (up 21%). 

Import statistics for the first quarter 
of 1966 indicate a continuing strong up- 
surge in trade with the U.S. Total imports 
during January-March were valued at 
$1.2 billion, an 8% increase over the 
first quarter of 1965. Imports from the 
U.S. during the first quarter reached $111 
million, an impressive 17% gain over the 
corresponding 1965 period. 

Export trade also advanced signifi- 
cantly last year. Total exports for 1965 
were valued at $3,973 million, 8% over 
the previous year. While impressive, the 
increase failed to keep pace with the 14% 
increase in total imports. Imports ex- 
ceeded exports by approximately $400 
million. The problem is being met through 
measures to restrain inflationary trends, 
already described, and through a vigorous 
export promotion program. 

Expenditures to increase 

Because of the increase this year in 
Swedish private investment expenditures, 
the market is especially promising for 
U.S. industrial machinery required by the 
basic industries. These include engineer- 
ing industries (producing heavy machin- 
ery, motor vehicles, aircraft, ships); 
metal industries; forest product indus- 
tries; and the rapidly growing chemical 
and plastics industries. 

Sweden also offers promising sales 
opportunities for new and well-designed 
consumer articles. 

The U.S. export expansion program 
this year in Sweden will include several 
shows in the U.S. Trade Center in Stock- 
holm. Designed to appeal not only to 
Swedish businessmen but to business visi- 



tors from the entire Nordic Area, the new 
U.S. showcase will present an exhibit of 
Equipment and Accessories for the Pulp 
and Paper Industries Sept. 13-21. Other 
shows featuring a wide variety of prod- 
ucts are under preparation; these will be 
announced in later issues of Interna- 
tional Commerce. The Center, which 
opened in March 1965, is available for 
use by U.S. firms and their overseas 
representatives for company exhibits, 
meetings, and many other purposes in 
addition to major scheduled product 
shows. 

Most branches of Swedish industry are 
expected to register moderate production 
gains this year. The machinery indus- 
tries, most important in terms of total 
output, are operating at near-capacity 
levels. 

The paper industry is also reporting 
that the market outlook for most major 
grades of paper and paperboard is favor- 
able and production should remain at a 
high level throughout the year. The pulp 
industry, though depressed by a softening 
of world demand in past months, reports 
that demand is becoming brisker as pulp 
buyers abroad run down their inventories. 

In contrast with these favorable pro- 
duction trends, the textile and shoe in- 
dustries have been pressed by increasing 
competition from foreign manufacturers. 
Since early this year, several textile 
industry plants have been forced to close 
and additional shutdowns are likely. To 
make the industries more competitive, 
extensive modernization of remaining 
plants will be needed. This development 
should provide significant sales oppor- 
tunities for U.S. producers of textile and 
shoe manufacturing machinery. 



INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE • July J8, 7966 



Your 

new symbol for 

banking in the 

growing port cities 




FIRST-CITIZENS BANK 

the Can-Do Bank with the Can-Do People! 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



WADE H. PIERCE 
Manager — Import Oept. 



L. M. WALLACE 
Manager -Export Dept. 



JESSE C. JACOBS 
Asst. Her. — Import Oepl. 



Wi/mingfon 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 

Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

Charlotte, N. C. Morehead City, N. C. 



BARBER 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 

• 

Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., P. O. Box No. 6334 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



o\(o/it(i Carolina Skipping Co. 



STEAMSHIP & FORWARDING AGENTS 

STEVEDORES 
MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



TWX: 919-255-2925 
Phone: 919-726-6173 
P. O. Box 650 



F.M.C. License #1079 
Cable Address 
"Davies" 



TO N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
P. O. BOX 149 
RALEIGH, N. C. 27602 

This is my correct address and zip code. I wish to 
continue the North Carolina State Ports Maga- 
zine. 

Name 

Address 

Zip 



AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year Wound mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



J 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



7865 



701 

Years 
Now 



1966 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 

PArk 6-5300 

Now Orleans 12, La. 

Carondalat Building 

JAckton 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SAratoaa 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4312 



New York 4, N. Y. 

S3 South William Straat 

WHItahall 4-9120 

F.M.C. Llcenta No. 481 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agent, 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




^MweAead Oty 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 
■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

G. D. Zeolond, Executive Director 

Drower B 919-728-31 15 

Beaufort, N. C. Courthouse Annex 



23 



c 



®W7 W1 ™ 

CARTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island -Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leory, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



24 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone HO, 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Colorcraff of Wilmington, Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color 



Block & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 91 9-762-6352 



F M.C No 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

1211 McCall Street 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. Box 93 

Atando Station 

Charlotte. N. C. 28286 



Norfolk-Newport News, Va 

Citizens Bank Bldg. 

Norfolk 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldg . 



Alexandria. Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member Notional Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolino Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING BUILDING. RALEIGH 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Mgr. -Export Dept. 



PAl'L JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919 255-2989 

Branch Office: Charlotte. N. C. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



BULK RATE 
U 5 Poiiog. 

PAID 
»ol.,»* N C 
P.,m.t No 33 



IN 1869 




WHEN HEIDE WAS FOUNDED 
WHAT ELSE HAPPENED? 

* Ulysses S. Grant Was Elected President. 

* First Transcontinental Rail System Was Inaugurated With The Linking of Central 
Pacific With Union Pacific. 

* Professional Baseball Became A Reality With The Cincinnati Red Stockings 
Touring The East And Middle West With Paid Players. 

* Intercollegiate Football Got Its Start — Rutgers Beating Princeton 6-4. Twenty- 
five Men To A Team With No Running With The Ball. 

* Miss Arabella Mansfield Became The First American Woman To Become A 
Lawyer With Her Admission To The Iowa Bar. 

* The Wyoming Territory Granted The First Woman Suffrage. 

* The First Suction Type Vacuum Cleaner Was Patented. 

* Heide and Company Handled Its First Vessel. 

* And coincidentally, in 1869 Luckenbach Steamship Company was 19 years old. 

HEIDE COMPANY, INC. 

FOUNDED 1869 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 
WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight Forwarders,- Stevedores 




Before you ride off in all directions... 
talk to a Wachovia International Specialist. 



Doing business abroad can be frustrating. But it 
doesn't have to be. 

You can let a Wachovia International Specialist 
smooth the way for you. His fingers are on the eco- 
nomic pulse of six continents. He can assist you in 
buying or selling in every major world market. You 
can also turn to Wachovia's International Department 
for trade leads, credit reports, untangling exchange 
regulations, acceptance financing, letters of credit, 
collection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 
So, before you take off in all directions, talk to 
Wachovia. 



INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT 



BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



Do«. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines ._. 22 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 24 

Brunswick County 22 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County ._. 23 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. 24 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

Glasgow Hicks Co 1 

Heide Company, Inc.-Luckenbach Back Cover 

Heide Company, Inc. 1 

Hi-Page Co. Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line , 23 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. . ....23 

New Hanover County 22 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co. 22 

North Carolina National Bank - 19 

Southern Railway System 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. Inside Front Cover 

Walker Taylor Insurance 24 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc. 23 

Wilmington Shipping Co. _. .22 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc .23 




_£* 



A. 



te 



wvtou 



Hunting for the best way to ship freight 
to, from and within the South? You can 
now rest easy. You've found it. South- 
ern. Try us and see. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 



MARINE INSURANCE 



509 MURCHISON HUILDINC 



PHONE 762-180G 



P. O. BOX 1678 



WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Heide Company, Inc. 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACH EY, Manager, Traffic Deportment 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

PO Box 232 Tel (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 




E. N. RICHARDS 



E. N. Richards, 
Developer-Promoter, 
takes the helm of the 

Ports Authority 



Executive Committee, H. L. WEATHERS, Vice Chairman 
J. O. FOIL, Member, E. N. RICHARDS, Chairman 



About twenty years ago a native New Yorker, 
member of a prominent Brooklyn and Long Island 
family, came to piedmont North Carolina to promote 
housing developments in the middle income ranges. 
Becoming very much attracted to the people and 
potential of this state, he settled in Raleigh eventually, 
and began his own enterprise, which he was to expand 
into one of the most prominent development companies 
in the South. 

E. N. Richards, President and moving force of 
E. N. Richards, Associates, is now "A Tarheel" tried 
and true, and no one would ever realize that he 
originally sprang from Brooklyn unless they had 
heard his own private jokes about it. 

In September, 1966, the Governor of North Caro- 
lina announced that John M. Reeves of Pinehurst was 
retiring as Chairman of the North Carolina State 
Ports Authority after nine years of outstanding serv- 
ice. At the same time, the Ports Authority elected 
Developer Richards to be its Chairman. 

His list of accomplishments and honors are literally 
too numerous to be mentioned on a page. He has been 
a Director or Chairman of just about every civic and 



business endeavor one can think of. For example: He 
was one of the prime movers of Carter Stadium; the 
Raleigh YMCA ; the North Carolina School of the Arts. 
He is the developer of Country Club Homes; Country 
Club Hills; North Hills Estates; Ridgewood Shopping 
Center; and North Hills Shopping Center in Raleigh; 
a large housing development and a large shopping 
center in Jacksonville. He helped direct the purchase 
and refurbishing of the Sir Walter Hotel. He is a 
banker of prominence, serving on the board of two. 
He is also a Director of a railroad. 

During the early phases of his expanding develop- 
ment program, he traveled in his own airplane and on 
his own boat. As his efforts became more successful 
and his enterprises more organized, his travel has 
principally been confined to automobile and commercial 
airlines. He no longer lays claim to being a "Sea 
Captain" and no longer operates his own private air- 
line, but he does operate a horse. 

During all of these, and many more, endeavors he 
accepted an appointment in 1961 as a member of the 
Ports Authority. In 1965 he was elevated to Vice- 
Chairman and, now Chairman of the Ports Authority. 






AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

E.N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
WILLIAM B. GLENN, Greenville 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 

HENRY LEE WEATHERS, Shelby, V. Chairman 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce ir Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

HUGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Fori Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PA 6-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28101 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS, Operations Manager 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE PORTS 



NTER ISSUE, 1967, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 12, NO. 4 



or information about: 

HE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
. O. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



)NTENTS 



Page 

Governor Greets Chairman 2 

Governor Welcome New Member 4 

Reeves — Distinguished Award 6 

John Palmer on Tobacco 8 

Collins & Aikman 10 

Down the Historyland Trails 12 

Stockholm 16 

Exportunities 18 



SOUTH PORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 1 19-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 




COVER STORY 

Our cover shows the true seal of 
the State of North Carolina. There 
are many seals being used by various 
agencies and display. 

This is the one the Governor uses, 
and the evolution of the seal is traced 
on Pages 12 and 13 by Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Wilborn of the North Carolina 
Department of Archives & History. 
The appearance and the disappear- 
ance of the ship in the historical 
background of the "Great Seal" is 
of particular interest to us. 




E. N. RICHARDS 



GOVERNOR DAN K. MOORE 



E. N. Richards, 
Developer-Promoter, 
takes the helm of the 

Ports Authority 



Exe 
J. ( 



About twenty years ago a native New Yorker, bus 

member of a prominent Brooklyn and Long Island was 

family, came to piedmont North Carolina to promote Ral 

housing developments in the middle income ranges. He 

Becoming very much attracted to the people and Clu 

potential of this state, he settled in Raleigh eventually, Cei 

and began his own enterprise, which he was to expand a 1 

into one of the most prominent development companies cen 

in the South. and 

E. N. Richards, President and moving force of bar 

E. N. Richards, Associates, is now "A Tarheel" tried He 

and true, and no one would ever realize that he I 

originally sprang from Brooklyn unless they had mei 

heard his own private jokes about it. his 

In September, 1966, the Governor of North Caro- and 

Una announced that John M. Reeves of Pinehurst was prii 

retiring as Chairman of the North Carolina State air! 

Ports Authority after nine years of outstanding serv- Cap 

ice. At the same time, the Ports Authority elected line 

Developer Richards to be its Chairman. E 

His list of accomplishments and honors are literally acC( 

too numerous to be mentioned on a page. He has been P° r 

a Director or Chairman of just about every civic and Chi 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

ED N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
WILLIAM B. GLENN, Greenville 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 

HENRY LEE WEATHERS, Shelby, V. Chairman 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE PORTS 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

I. E. LEE. JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

HUGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PArk 6-3158 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 
TWX 510-924-2983 
Tel. 919 ROger 3-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 
W. H. FRIEDERICHS 

Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 
H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 
Telephone 919-457-2621 
P. O. Box 578-28461 



WINTER ISSUE, 1967, SPA MAGAZINF 



VOL. 12, NO. 4 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Governor Greets Chairman 2 

Governor Welcome New Member 4 

Reeves — Distinguished Award 6 

John Palmer on Tobacco 8 

Collins & Aikman 10 

Down the Historyland Trails 12 

Stockholm 16 

Exportunities 18 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 11 9-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 




COVER STORY 

Our cover shows the true seal of 
the State of North Carolina. There 
are many seals being used by various 
agencies and display. 

This is the one the Governor uses, 
and the evolution of the seal is traced 
on Pages 12 and 13 by Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Wilborn of the North Carolina 
Department of Archives & History. 
The appearance and the disappear- 
ance of the ship in the historical 
background of the "Great Seal" is 
of particular interest to us. 




LAMAR GUDGER. Asheville. New Member, GOVERNOR MOORE 



Governor Moore meets 
with Authority and 

welcomes new member 

Governor Moore announced October 14, 1966 the 
appointment of Asheville Attorney Lamar Gudger, 
47, as a member of the State Ports Authority to 
succeed John M. Reeves of Pinehurst, who has re- 
signed. Gudger will serve the remainder of the term 
expiring June 30, 1969. 

Gudger, a native of Asheville, represented Bun- 
combe County in the 1951 General Assembly as a 
member of the House, and from 1951-1954 was solici- 
tor of the 19th Solicitorial District. He was secretary 
of the State Democratic Executive Committee in 1962 
and at present serves as a member of the party's 
audit committee. 

He received his early education in Asheville City 
Schools, was awarded his A.B. degree from the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina in 1940 and his LL.B. de- 
gree in 1942. While at Chapel Hill he was associate 
editor-in-chief of the Law Review. 

He is a member of the Board of Stewards of the 
Central Methodist Church of Asheville, a member of 
the Mountain City Club, Civitan Club, Biltmore For- 
est Country Club, the Planning Council, City of Ashe- 
ville, and the Asheville Chamber of Commerce. 

During World War II, he served as a captain in 
the U. S. Army Air Corps, in the Eighth Air Force, 
European Theatre. He had 30 missions and was 
awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the air 
medal with five Oak Leaf clusters and other decor- 
ations. He is married to the former Eugenia Reid of 
Dobson, and they have four children, Carole Eugenia, 
Martha Elizabeth, Lamar Gudger. Ill, and Eugene 
R. Gudger. 



Fantasyland at festival time describes beautiful Greenfield Lake and 
gardens during the North Carolina Azalea Festival at Wilmington 
scheduled this year on April 6-9. This characteristic scene shows the 
bright and brilliant azaleas in full bloom against a forest of giant 
cypress trees along the banks of the municipally-owned Greenfield 
Lake. It depicts a primeval quality of forest and flowers, yet modern 
in beauty and living color. (Photo by Hugh Morton) 




Batson Paper and Plastics Machinery, Inc., of 
Greenville, South Carolina, an affiliate of Louis P. 
Batson Company, has imported through the port of 
Wilmington, North Carolina, what is believed to be 
the largest single piece of plastics machinery ever 
imported into the United States. 

The machine, delivered to an undisclosed location 
because of industrial security, is designed for stretch- 
ing of plastic films. 

The shipment was delivered from Bremerhaven, 
Germany, to Wilmington aboard "The American Re- 
porter" in 32 cases, with a gross weight in excess of 
85 tons. In its final assembled condition, the machine 
is over 97 feet long. Satisfaction with this machine 
has already led to the purchase of an even larger 
model from the Batson Company. 

The Louis P. Batson Company and its affiliate 
companies is a large importer of textile, paper, and 
plastics machinery through the port of Wilmington. 




Greenville, South Carolina firm 
finds Wilmington, N. C. useful 



TTT^ 





JOHN M. REEVES, Pinehurst, GOVERNOR MOORE 



Governor presents 
DISTINGUISHED CITIZEN'S AWARD 

to John M. Reeves 



John M. Reeves, recently retired as Chairman of 
the North Carolina State Ports Authority, is a native 
North Carolinian who has left his mark in the na- 
tional industrial community. He was born in Surry 
County on a farm not too far from the junction of the 
Ararat and the Yadkin Rivers at the foot of Pilot 
Mountain. He is a member of a large family and the 
family has connections throughout North Carolina. 
For example, the Mercer in his name is related to 
the town of Winnabow in Brunswick County. Today, 
Reeves' kinfolk are prominent in the life of Chatham, 
Lee, Moore and Cumberland, as well as Surry. 



As a boy, he made up his mind to attend the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, where he graduated in the 
Class of 1910. Early in life he and his brother went 
into the textile business, and in 1920 founded the 
corporation known as Reeves Brothers Company, 
which has grown to be one of the larger textile oper- 
ations in the United States and whose diversification 
from New Jersey has established plants in North 
and South Carolina. 

Mr. Reeves has served as Chairman of the Board 
of American University. He is benefactor of the 
Methodist College of Fayetteville, the Occoneechee 



— AT PRESS TIME — 



The following tabulation shows that the North Carolina State Porta set records in tonnage*, gross revenues and ships in the year, 1966. 
It is also interesting to note that 25,410 motor carrier units carried cargo to and from the two port terminals. This more than doubled 
the number of trucks used at our ports in the calendar year 1961. 



1966 

Gi'oss Revenues 
Tonnages 
Ships 

Railroad Cars 
Trailers 



Morehead City 

692,592 
420,734 



Wilmington 

1,412,015 

581.382 

490 



Total 

2,004.607 

1,002.116 

829 

8,626 

25.410 



Council of the Boy Scouts of America. A Boy Scout 
Camp at Carthage in Moore County is named for him. 
The Moore County Hospital and many other insti- 
tutions have felt the generosity of this man. 

He is married to the former Virginia McKenzie 
and they have three daughters, all of whom are mar- 
ried — one living in Wilmington, North Carolina, one 
in New York and one in Rome, Italy. 

In 1957, Mr. John M. Reeves was made Chairman 
of the Ports Authority by Governor Luther H. 
Hodges. Serving with him on the Board at that time 
were W. G. Clark of Tarboro, Vice-Chairman, Earl 
Phillips of High Point, Collier Cobb of Chapel Hill, 
Kirkwood Adams of Roanoke Rapids, Charles Gray 
of Gastonia, and retired General of the Army, Robert 
L. Eichelberger (deceased). 

In 1959, Thomas Evins (deceased) of Durham and 
Harvey C. Hines of Kinston were added to the Board. 

In 1961, Mr. Reeves and W. G. Clark, Jr. were re- 
appointed by Governor Terry Sanford. Both were re- 
elected. E. B. Ficklen of Greenville came on the Board 
and became an Executive Committeman. E. N. Rich- 
ards of Raleigh; E. G. Anderson of Robersonville; 
J. O. Foil of Greensboro; James F. Latham of Burl- 
ington; William Pharr of McAdenville and Cooper D. 
Cass of Winston-Salem were appointed to the Au- 
thority by Sanford for staggered terms of 6 years. 

In 1960 a decision had been reached to try for a 
13% million dollars appropriation from the General 
Assembly for a ten-year expansion program of the 
Ports Authority. In the meantime, indications were 
that a million tons of cargo would be passing through 
the two port terminals by 1966. Purchase of gantry 
cranes traveling the length of the wharf at Wil- 
mington, emphasis placed on tobacco export at More- 
head City, reorganization of the Public Relations 
section, and a more aggressive sales promotion all 
these improvements and more began to move the 
Ports Authority forward beyond the fondest dreams 
of supporters. 

North Carolina's maritime progress has shown 
steady growth for the past nine years. Although the 
emphasis on world trade — nationwide has a great 
deal to do with this progress, it is also a fact the 
N. C. and the Ports Authority were pioneers in re- 
newed emphasis. 




Front row: JOHN M. REEVES, retired— E. N. RICHARDS. Chairman 
Standing Itor: LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville, E. G. ANDERSON. 
Robersonville. H. L. WEATHERS. Shelby. J. 0. FOIL. Greensboro. 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville, F. H. ROSS, Charlotte 




Seated: 1. JOHN M. REEVES with former members of the Authority 
at the Governors Mansion 

2. W. G. CLARK. JR., Tarboro. 3. COLLIER COBB. Chapel Hill 
Standing: KIRKWOOD ADAMS. Roanoke Rapids. JAMES LATHAM. 
New Superior Court Judge. Burlington. COO PER D (' ASS. Winston-Salem. 
HARVEY HINES. Kinston. EARL PHILLIPS. High Point 




The 

EXPORT 

TOBACCO 

Picture 



JOHN D. PALMER, PRESIDENT 
TOBACCO ASSOCIATES, INC. 



Just over eight centuries ago, in the year 1165, a small 
trade fair was held in what is now East Germany and 
what is now the city of Leipsig. 

Then only a small village, it was located in the midst 
of a plain which was intersected by the main highways 
of Central Europe. It was, therefore, a logical location 
for a trading center. 

From that Leipsig of 1165, it became, along with Ham- 
burg and Berlin, one of the three most important cities 
of Germany in trade and industry. Its growth was due, 
in large measure, to trade fairs which have been held 
with few exceptions twice a year, in the Spring and 
Autumn, during the past 801 years. 

I might add, parenthetically, that in religion, music 
and culture, Leipsig also took its place among the lead- 
ing centers of the world. It was here in 1519 that Martin 
Luther engaged in the famous public debate on the 
question of Roman papal authority. It was here that 
the celebrated composer and musician, Johann Sebastian 
Bach, served as organist in the Church at St. Thomas. 

Today, and ever since the end of World War II, East 
Germany has been a part of the Communist, Iron Cur- 
tain bloc, and it was because of that very fact, coupled 
with Leipsig's historical pre-eminence as a trading cen- 
ter that Tobacco Associates determined a year ago to 
participate in the Fair. 

Our purpose in doing so was to accomplish two sep- 
arate objectives, but which, in actuality, are identical. 
One was to use the Fair as a key, or a wedge, or a 
stepping stone, or a catalyst, — or whatever it might be 
called — in promoting and developing trade in flue-cured 
tobacco behind the Iron Curtain. There was already a 
trickle of tobacco flowing across that frontier, but it 
was so tiny by comparison with the full potential as to 
be utterly insignificant. 

By that I mean that East Germany alone has a popu- 
lation of 17 million, or about one-third that- of West 
Germany which in 1965 was the world's largest single 
importer of tobacco, taking in excess of 300 million 
pounds, including 95 million from the United States, of 
which about 70 million was flue^cured. 




As the Ethiopian doesn't change his skin, nor the 
leopard his spots, neither does a political boundary line 
change a German's preference for cigarettes; wherefore 
if his cousins across the border want American tobacco, 
so does the East German. That is but a part of the 
story, for there are some 300 million other people be- 
hind the Curtain, and it is an established fact that 
wherever in the world cigarettes containing our tobacco 
have been made available, a public demand has simul- 
taneously been created. The possibilities, then, in that 
vast population are enormous for American tobacco. 

The other objective was to contribute to the overall 
effort of the United States to reduce, and hopefully, to 
eliminate in time, cold war and enmity and replace 
them with trade and friendship. 

Thus, I say, the two objectives are identical, for 
mutually profitable trade and peace are inseparable. 

It was against this background, and upon these prem- 
ises that we went to Leipsig, first in March of this year, 
and again last September. 

What was accomplished? Far less than our ultimate 
goal; far more than our most sanguine expectations 
in November of last year. 

In monetary terms, flue-cured purchases were made 
this year in excess of $2.5 million, by comparison with 
a zero figure only three or four years ago. 

In terms of policies and precedents for the future, we 
were able to arrange with the State Department for 
visas for three East German tobacconists to come to this 
country during September and October. I think I am 
correct in saying that they are three out of no more 
than ten or a dozen East Germans who have been al- 
lowed in this country for any reason in a number of 
years. 

In terms of relationships, we demonstrated not only 
our desire to simply sell tobacco, but the willingness of 
our government to extend the hand of friendship through 
the granting of entry permits to the three tobacco men. 
It is hardly necessary to point out that due note was 
almost certainly made in Moscow of the presence of 
Tobacco Associates in Communist territory; and I dare- 
say that India and Rhodesia — both large suppliers of 
free-world tobacco to the bloc, are not unaware of our 
activity in that area. 

We have been talking East- West trade in tobacco for 
more than two years, and now we are tremendously en- 
couraged by the President's statement only last month 
that the Administration would press for legislative 
authority to negotiate trade agreements which could 
extend most-favored-nation tariff treatment to European 
Communist States. 



The wisdom of doing so — or stated in the reverse — the 
stupidity of not doing so — from almost any approach to 
the matter that one may take is shown by cold, com- 
mercial figures. In 1965, our allies in Japan and Western 
Europe exported nearly $4 billion in merchandise to 
European Communist countries, while our shipments 
were less than $140 million — about 1/30 of imports from 
the free world. 

We have put our hand to the plough and we intend to 
plough a furrow for tobacco trade in the bloc countries. 
We are not going to turn it aloose and we are not going 
to flag nor fail in our efforts to open one of the largest 
untapped markets in the world for our tobacco. 

An item of extreme significance to tobacco and agri- 
culture in general is the new Food for Peace program 
which is an extension for two years of the old Public 
Law 480. An essential difference between the new pro- 
gram and its predecessor is that the new program looks 
to the possibility of sales and needs abroad in terms of 
what we can produce rather than the old premise under 
which the current P.L. 480 program works of selling 
only surplus agricultural products. In short, it will be a 
question in the future of producing as much as we can 
sell abroad rather than simply disposing of any over- 
production. 



H 


mi 


li 


m 




■ 


■ 








































jm^-'fJK 


*/■ "2" £ 






**' -%t 


~3fc 


PS* 

real 


Ju*3% 


f*<^SE 


CttjM 







NORTH CAROLINA 
Industry Uses Ports 



COLLINS & AIKMAN 



by Mike O'Hara 



The name Collins & Aikman is virtually a synonym for 
textile diversification, for the company's products range 
from gossamer tricot fabrics for lingerie, loungewear and 
dresses to broadloom carpeting, matchless furniture up- 
holstery, fabrics and carpets for automobiles and air- 
craft, and a variety of other textiles and yarns. 

The company is well represented along the eastern sea- 
board, with plants in Pennsylvania, South Carolina and 
Georgia, but it is in North Carolina that the backbone 
of the company is located. 

A chain of nine plants stretches across the state, rang- 
ing from Farmville in the east to Old Fort in the west. 
Every product that the company produces can be found 
in the products manufactured by the North Carolina 
plants, except for broadloom carpeting which is manu- 
factured in two Dalton, Georgia mills. 

Collins & Aikman is both one of the older textile con- 
cerns in the nation and also one of the newest, in terms 
of product. 

The firm had its beginnings in 1843 when Gibbons L. 
Kelty opened a store in lower Manhattan to sell window 
shades. The Kelty interest grew through expansion and 
mergers into the Collins & Aikman Company which last 
year reported sales of nearly $154 million. 

The company, which began as many textile companies 
did, as a New England-based corporation slowly moved 
south as mills and machinery became obsolete. 

The Ca-Vel plant at Roxboro, N. C, was the first south- 
ern plant purchased in 1928. It was then, and still is, 
the foremost weaver of plush pile fabrics in the nation. 



Today Ca-Vel upholstery fabrics are gracing the seats 
in the new Metropolitan Opera House at New York's 
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and a number 
of other major civic centers. 

C & A can boast many firsts. Its Farmville plant is 
the largest tricot knitting mill in the world, capable of 
turning out thousands of yards of the fabric a day. The 
tricot market has grown rapidly in the past few years 
as manufacturers find further uses for the many-faceted 
fabric. Today the cloth not only goes into lingerie, it is 
used as a backing fabric, it is brushed into pile-like fabric, 
becomes the finest in men's wash and wear shirts, and 
finds many other uses. 

A three-plant complex makes up the company's Auto- 
motive Division in North Carolina. Automotive upholstery 
fabrics and a number of other industrial fabrics are 
woven at Siler City, then they are dyed and finished at 
the division's headquarters at Albemarle. 

Albemarle also houses the company's tufting machines 
that produce most of the automotive carpeting sold by 
Collins & Aikman. After the carpet is tufted, dyed and 
finished, it is shipped by truck to the Old Fort fabrication 
plant when it takes final form as the molded carpets which 
grace the floorboards of the nation's automobiles. 

The division also produces upholstery and carpeting for 
the nation's airlines as well as for other transportation 
industries. 

Looms in C&A's Concord, N. C. plant are constantly 
busy producing a variety of decorator fabrics for up- 
holstery. The Concord plant, along with one in Lavonia, 




A landmark to anyone who drives highway US 64 from Raleigh to Asheboro or beyond is the C&A plant at Siler City. Here the company weaves 
automotive fabrics. 

10 



Georgia, makes up the Home Fabrics Division. 

Equally essential to the company's operations are two 
plants at Norwood and Troy which spin yarns for both 
company use and for outside sales. The company recently 
added Kenlon Mills Inc. of Allendale, S. C, to its yarn 
division. 

Collins & Aikman is international in scope. Its Canadian 
subsidiary, Collins & Aikman Limited, operates four 
plants which produce most of the same types of products 
manufactured in the States. An affiliated company in 
Belgium produces home furnishings, apparel and industrial 
fabrics for sale in the Common Market countries. 

The company has seen tremendous growth over the 
past few years. During the fiscal year ended February 26, 
1966, C&A spent more than $8 million in equipment, 
modernization and expansion. 

Recently the company announced that it would build 
a computer center, research and development facility and 
staff office complex near Charlotte on land adjoining the 
University of North Carolina campus. 

The company disclosure triggered action by the city and 
Mecklenburg County governments to zone the area for 
further development as a research center which might 
some day rival the Research Triangle between Raleigh- 
Durham-Chapel Hill. 

The company's growth under Donald F. McCullough, 
C&A's president, has been fast paced, and as long as the 
economy continues to hold the future looks bright for C&A. 





Collins & Aikman recently Introduced tufting to the Stanly Co 
area. The company is a major supplier of fabrics and carpets 
the- automotive and aircraft industries. 



All the decorator fabrics that C&A's Ca-Vel Division produce 

with the talented hands of Designer Catherine Bowlin. Here, surrounded 
by designs for future fabrics, she works on a new velvet pattern. 



11 



DOWN THE HISTORYLAND Tl 

by Elizabeth W. Wilborn N. C. Department of Archives & History 



"Dear Sir: 

Please send me the colors of your state seal. I am 
making a set of fourteen petit point chair seats using 
the state seals of the thirteen original colonies and 
the presidential seal and I need to know . . ." 

This kind of mail floods the office of the Gover- 
nor, the Secretary of State and the Departments of 
Archives and History and Conservation and Develop- 
ment. Almost daily someone writes for the coat-of- 
arms of North Carolina. Once the governor of a state 
wrote and requested that a seal be sent so that his 
architect could add the North Carolina seal to that 
of the other forty-nine states to be used to decorate 
a new building. 

For more than 300 years the Great Seal of North 
Carolina has served to make official documents of the 
colony or state. 

There have been years when the Great Seal was 
not used, as during the Cary Rebellion in 1708 when 
Cary used his own family arms to seal his official 
papers. 

About five years ago a military unit decided that 
they liked the "old girls" on the state seal. They 
wanted their own flag and insignia to bear the Great 
Seal and wondered if its use would be permitted. 
They received an affirmative reply and were assured 
that as long as their facsimile was for an honorable 
purpose "without intent to defame" its use was per- 
missible. 




1730-1767 
The ship appears 

Rather buxom figures attended the bewigged sover- 
eign on the seal of 1730. Liberty is shown introducing 
Plenty to His Majesty George II, who approved the 
design. The King's engraver, Rollas, was at this 
same time also preparing seals for Virginia, New 
Jersey, the Barbadoes, and Jamaica. 

At least a year went by before this seal was de- 
livered to Royal Governor Burrington in Edenton. 
Often a reprimand was forthcoming when a governor 
neglected to use the Great Seal of the Province before 
he sent the acts of the colonial assembly to Whitehall. 

When Governor William Tyron produced a new 
seal, bearing the date of July 9, 1767, the old seal was 
returned to Whitehall via a ship's captain. In addition 
to legislative acts the seal was affixed to land grants 
and other papers using the king's name. 

In 1771 Governor Martin wrote "that the Great 
Seal was broke." It was soon mended and was used 
until Martin and British authority were removed. 



One of the provisions of the Constitution adopted 
at Halifax on December 18, 1776, was that there 
should be a Seal of State kept by the governor and 
used by him. With little change this provision was 
retained in the constitutions of 1835 and 1868. Until 
a proper seal could be made, Governor Richard Caswell 
was authorized to use his private seal. The assemblies 
considered these matters seriously and spelled out 
the details, so that the engraver had explicit instruc- 
tions to guide his work. 




1767-1779 

The ship 

is still there 

Poor Governor Richard Dobbs Spaight must have 
felt the weight of the seal — as well as of his office — 
for he pleaded in 1793 that the Great Seal could be 
carried only by car or wagon, as it was so unwieldy 
and heavy. Perhaps this burden forced the chief 
executives to request a permanent capital! The "high- 
way" system of the late 1700's did not help the 
situation, so it is small wonder the Governor found 
it inconvenient to carry the Seal, yet it was even 
worse to leave it behind with the Secretary. 

Since the land grants and other documents were 
written on parchment in the early days and the great 
wax seals made them even heavier, the colonists com- 
plained of the expense of delivery. Soon paper was 
substituted for parchment and impressions were made 
on the face of the grants. This solved a serious 
problem, for, as the records show, there were many 
land grants issued. 

Much of the detail found in the seal of today may 
be found in the seal that was used from 1794 to 1836. 
Liberty is seated (today she stands) with her cap on 
a pole and in her left hand she holds a scroll with 
"Constitution" on it. Plenty, who was standing (to- 
day she sits), holds her cornucopia upright in her 
right hand; in her left hand is an ear of corn. 

Earlier one of the seals had shown a sailing vessel 
on the obverse (face) side near the bottom. This ship 
is similar to those drawn on early maps. It is also 
to be seen on the "revised" seal of today which was 
carefully taken from impressions of the Great Seal in 
use at the present time. 




1779-1794 
The ship is gone 



12 



IL 



Seal of 

the 

Lords 

Proprietors 



1665 



■* - ■* 



to 




In 1883 Colonel Samuel McD. Tate introduced a 
bill into the General Assembly which became law. It 
describes minutely what the new seal should be: 
The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina 
shall be two and one-quarter inches in diameter, 
and its design shall be a representation of the 
figures of Liberty and Plenty looking toward 
each other, but not more than half fronting each 
other, and otherwise disposed as follows: Liberty, 
the first figure, standing, her pole with cap on it 
in her left hand and a scroll with the word 
"Constitution" inscribed thereon in her right 



1794-1836 

The ship 

is still missing 

hand. Plenty, the second figure, sitting down, her 
right arm half extended towards Liberty, three 
heads of wheat in her right hand, and in her left 
the small end of her horn, the mouth of which is 
resting at her feet, and the contents of the horn 
rolling out. 

The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina is 
two and one-quarter inches in diameter, and its de- 
sign is a representation of the figures of Liberty and 
Plenty, looking toward each other, but not more than 
half fronting each other, and otherwise disposed as 
stated above. This portion represents the coat-of-arms 
of the state. At the top and above the coat-of-arms 
are the words "May 20, 1775." Around the circum- 
ference is the legend "The Great Seal of the State of 
North Carolina" and the motto Esse Quam Videri. 
No real change was made from an artistic point 
of view in 1893 when Jacob Battle introduced a bill 
to add the motto Esse Quam Videri and to place the 
date "May 20, 1775" at the top of the coat-of-arms. 

It is interesting to note that on February 16, 
1883, Governor Thomas J. Jarvis wrote that he could 
find no description of the Great Seal in his office, and 
that he did not know that the seal he was using was 
genuine, only that it had been used by his predecessor. 
The Great Seal has been adopted in a variety of 
forms by numerous state agencies. There are cer- 
tainly a dozen and perhaps several dozen variations 
of the seal in use in 1967. 






Some of the figures of Liberty and Plenty are 
still corpulent and buxom; other figures have been 
trimmed down and are more sylph-like. The variety 
of hair styles and drapery are worth noting. Almost 
every printer in the state must have several cuts or 
negatives of the seal, all different. 

It was due to the lack of uniformity, and perhaps 
because some of the seals were ugly and lacked grace, 
that a search was made to produce the real seal. In 
true television fashion the real Great Seal of North 
Carolina was called forward. 

A number of gold wafers or paper seals were im- 
printed or impressed with the Great Seal in the 
custody of Secretary of State Thad Eure. 

Carefully each line was extracted, compared; 
sketched, compared; and finally a drawing was made 
that embodied all of the details described by law and, 
most important, found on the wafers ! 

This is the seal seen in the background when Gov- 
ernor Dan K. Moore reads a television message. It is 
the seal which may be purchased in a printed form 
from the Division of Publication, State Department 
of Archives and History, Box 1881, Raleigh. 

This may not be the seal on the letterhead of a 
commission of which you are a member, or on your 
garden club calendar, but it is the seal that most 
nearly resembles the twelve pound one in the State 
Capitol building. 



1893-1957 




1836-1893 
The ship is baek 



The ship 
is gone ago in 



The head of wheat held in the hand of Plenty num- 
ber only three — never five or seven ! The cap of 
Liberty is on the pole she holds in her left hand and 
not on her head; nor does Liberty wear a cap and 
carry one. The cornucopia is held at the small end by 
Plenty — her hand does not rest in the middle. Both 
the mountains and the sea — so much a part of the 
old North State — are in the background, and a small 
sailing vessel is seen beyond the left shoulder of 
Plenty. The word "Constitution" is hyphenated on the 
scroll in the right hand of Liberty. Many of these 
details have become confused in the seals used by 
state agencies and private companies. 

Recently the coat-of-arms of the state was requested 
to be used in the new American chapel in Saint 
Mary's Red Cliff, near Bristol, England. The request 
stated that the present coat-of-arms was desired 
"with the proper coloring in order that your state 
may be represented in the officially correct manner." 

See Cover — 1957-1967 — Tin ship is back t<> stay 



13 



EDGAR LUCKENBACH, JR 




RICHARD BARKER 




ROBERT F. WEISS 



EDGAR F. LUCKENBACH. JR., URGES CADETS AT THE MAINE 
MARITIME ACADEMY TO REESTABLISH THE UNITED STATES 
MERCHANT MARINE AS THE LEADER AMONG - THE WORLD'S 
MARITIME NATIONS. 

"Does a maritime nation, which the United 
States is by virtue of geography, need a Merchant 
Marine?" This question was raised in a challenge 
to the cadets and assembled faculty of the Marine 
Maritime Academy in Castine, Main, on December 
14, 1966 by Edgar F. Luckenbach, Jr., President 
and Chairman of the Board of Luckenbach Steam- 
ship Company, Inc. In his address Mr. Luckenbach 
projected his theme through the eyes of a hy- 
pothetical future student at the Academy as to 
what he could look to in terms of objectives and 
responsibilities for his chosen career. 

Mr. Luckenbach noted that the "American 
Merchant marine is at its lowest ebb." This he 
attributed to the tremendous activity of foreign 
nations in developing their respective merchant 
marine program. Mr. Luckenbach strongly feels 
that there is no need for the United States to be 
second best when only a few years ago this 
country boasted the best Merchant Marine in the 
world. He feels laxity in making known the 
continued need for a progressive Merchant Marine 
in the light of other programs of national interest 
cannot be condoned if the United States is to 
regain its position of leadership. 




WILLIAM B. RAND 




LUCKENBACH ELECTS TWO NEW OFFICERS 

Mr. Edgar F. Luckenbach, Jr., President of 
Luckenbach Steamship Company, Inc., later an- 
nounced the election of Mr. Richard E. Barker as 
Vice-President and Mr. Robert F. Weiss as Secre- 
tary of the Corporation. This action was taken at 
the annual Board of Directors meeting in recogni- 
tion of the accomplishments of both executives 
since joining the Luckenbach complex of com- 
panies. 

Mr. Barker, formerly a Vice-President of States 
Marine, came with Luckenbach in 1965 and has 
served as General Manager of Heide Company, 
Inc., of Wilmington and Morehead City, North 
Carolina, a Luckenbach affiliate. 

Mr. Weiss, prior to joining Luckenbach, served 
for ten years with Grace as Director of Budget 
and Systems. 

Mr. Luckenbach also announced the election of 
William B. Rand, who is retiring as President of 
the United States Lines to the Board of Lucken- 
bach Steamship Company, Inc. 

In making the announcement, Mr. Luckenbach 
stated that this was the first time in the company's 
116 year history a Director had been elected from 
outside of the company. He added that Mr. Rand's 
wide experience in maritime affairs, and his prac- 
tical and administrative knowledge of ships and 
cargo would be of tremendous assistance to the 
Luckenbach organization in its current diversifi- 
cation program. 



14 




PESTINA, the hitchhiking bug, 
is used by the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture to symbolize de- 
structive foreign plant and ani- 
mal pests and diseases that 
threaten U.S. resources. Such 
pests, capable of causing mil- 
lions of dollars damage, often 
hide on foreign fruits, plants, 
and meats that are as innocent- 
looking as PESTINA. The 
symbol is used to remind trav- 
elers to leave behind such 
items unless they have USDA 
clearance. 



Increased Travel Volume Adds to Inspection Job, USDA 
Says: 

A record volume in international travel and the war in 
Vietnam has caused added problems for agricultural 
quarantine inspectors. 

Agricultural quarantine inspectors of USDA's Agri- 
cultural Research Service stationed at the Nation's 
borders and at major seaports and airports work with 
Customs officials to inspect baggage and agricultural 
products coming into the United States. Each year they 
intercept several hundred thousand prohibited agricul- 
tural items which could be carrying plant pests dangerous 
to U. S. crops, forests and ornamentals. 

Customs officials and agricultural inspectors examined 
more than 42 million pieces of baggage last year, an in- 
crease of nearly 6 million pieces over fiscal 1965. 

As in past years, the baggage of travelers entering or 
returning to the United States yielded the largest number 
of prohibited materials. Of the nearly 523,000 prohibited 
items intercepted during the fiscal year, over 264,000 — 
more than half — were taken from baggage. Commercial 
cargo yielded only 3,598 interceptions. Other major sources 
of intercepted items were mail and ship and airplane 
stores. 

Most of the materials confiscated by inspectors were 
souvenirs — such as fruits, plants, and similar items — 
owned by persons who did not realize the items were 
prohibited or restricted. 

One major item intercepted was the coffee cherry, a 
popular souvenir among travelers to coffee producing 
countries. The coffee cherry is a bright red berry re- 
sembling cherries and its seed is the well-known coffee 
"bean." Travelers often bring the berries home without 
realizing they may contain larvae of the Mediterranean 
fruit fly, a pest which could cause millions of dollars 
worth of damage to U. S. citrus crops. 



Even though 134 Medfly interceptions were made dur- 
ing the last fiscal year, this pest somehow got into Browns- 
ville, Texas, threatening a major citrus producing area. 
Luckily, the infestation was discovered before the winter 
growing season and USDA is cooperating with the State 
of Texas and the Republic of Mexico in an extensive 
eradication effort to eliminate this newly introduced pest. 

It cost about $10 million to eradicate the Medfly when 
it invaded parts of Florida in 1956. Expensive as it was, 
the eradication program cost only about half as much 
as the Medfly's estimated destructive potential for a 
single year. 

Although many intercepted pests are found in plants 
or plant products, they can be found almost anywhere. 
For example, inspectors in Honolulu found several live 
Medfly larvae in the trunk of a California-bound car. 
The larvae apparently had come out of mangoes which 
had been thrown into the trunk. The owner had carefully 
removed the fruit, but he overlooked the tiny insect larvae. 

Unfortunately, not all of the materials intercepted are 
brought in as innocently as the ones described above. 
Inspectors discovered 40 pounds of prohibited meats in 
the spare tire of a car being brought into the United 
States from a European country were foot-and-mouth 
disease exists. 

Quarantine inspectors require that vehicles from cer- 
tain countries entering the U. S. be washed because soil 
can harbor unwanted pests. 

Since most materials intercepted belong to persons 
unaware of quarantine restrictions, USDA conducts an 
educational program to make the public aware of the 
problem. Persons desiring information on agricultural 
quarantines or permits to bring agricultural materials 
into the country may obtain details by writing: Plant 
Quarantine Division, Agricultural Research Service, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, Hyattsville, Md., 20782. 



15 




Chairman Richards, Member Ross and Salesman Lee Visi 




Gunnar Anderson of the Swedish-American Lines talks to Jack Lee in the 
State Ports Authority Booth at Stockholm. On the right is Miriam Rabb of the 
Travel & Promotion Section of C & D Department, whose booth adjoined the 
Ports Authority's. 



The participation by the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority in the North Carolina Trade Fair in Stock- 
holm and subsequent North Carolina Trade Mission to 
Germany, Belgium, Holland and England, was, in 
our opinion, very successful. 

For the first time in any U. S. Trade Center any- 
where in the world, the entire exhibit was made up of 
products manufactured in one state. Emphasis from 
every angle was centered on the State of North 
Carolina to those persons visiting the exhibit. The 
Ports Authority booth in this exhibit gave us an 
opportunity to talk with those persons interested in 
the purchase of North Carolina textile products, as 
well as providing the opportunity of a closer work- 
ing relationship with the North Carolina exhibitors 
themselves. Our participation in this event also pro- 
vided the opportunity for contacts with the foreign 
offices of steamship lines serving the ports of Sweden 
and North Carolina. 

The following Trade Mission to Germany, Belgium, 
Holland and England was equally successful. Through 
the very able assistance of the various U. S. Embassy 
and Consulate representatives, we were furnished 
pertinent information concerning the respective coun- 



JACK MAY, Burlington, with LEE 



tries in which we visited, as well as, prearranged 
appointments with various organizations and indi- 
viduals where the possibilities of mutual interests 
existed. 

In this respect, we contacted numerous shippers, 
freight forwarding organizations, steamship lines 
and ports authorities. We had the opportunity of 
personalized tours of some of the larger ports, where 
we observed physical installations and operations, as 
well as, learning something of the method of oper- 
ation of some of the foreign ports authorities similar 
to our own. 

Everything taken into consideration, we consider 
the experience to have been well worth the time and 
effort and we are looking forward to a follow-up visit 
at some time in the future. 



16 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 
by E E Lee, Jr. 



Stockholm Trade Fair and Europe 




N. C. Trade Mission in Brussels, Belgium, minus Sammy Ross : 
Front Row — left to right. 

John F. Votta, Wica Chemicals, Inc., Charlotte; G. I. Coulburn, Coulburn Lumber Co., Inc., Suffolk, Va. ; Jack Hicks, Carolina Soap & Candle- 
stick Makers, Southern Pines; Richard Moortgat, Commercial Asst. Representing, U. S. Embassy, Brussels; Sam Dinerman, Three Mountaineers, 
Lucerne, Switzerland; E. Paul Hawk, Commercial Attache, Brussels; Col. Wm. F. Grell, Westbury Hotel, Brussels. 
Back Row — left to right. 

James L. Robb, Superior Cable Corp., Hickory; W. R. Anthony, Wachovia Bank, Winston-Salem; Ed Mercaldo, Export Development Co-ordinator, 
C & I Div. of Conservation & Development, Raleigh; E. E. Lee, Jr. Dir. of Commerce, N. C. State Ports Authority, Wilmington; Leon Capel, 
Jr., A. Leon Capel & Sons, Inc., Troy. 




Coincidence on Friday ,The i3th 

Chas. McNeill of Morehead City, Operations Man- 
ager for the Ports Authority, sends us a photo taken 
on February 13, 1965, and points out a coincidence 
that's too eerie to overlook: 

In Berth #5 on February 13th, was a ship called 
the TUEBINGEN, which was the 13th ship handled 
at Morehead City in that year by the North Carolina 
Shipping Company. She was loaded and sailed at 
13:13 hours on this Friday, the 13th. 



NEW COPY 
H. A. Schmidt, Manager, Southport Boat Harbor 
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Schmidt — Southport 
A girl, Paula Lee, October 25, 1966—8 lbs. 14ozs. 
B. A. De Vane, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secre- 
tary, NCSPA, Wilmington 
Mr. and Mrs. Buff A. De Vane, Wilmington 
A girl, Ashley Stuart, December 4, 1966 — 5 
lbs. 3% ozs. 



oWo/ttk CMo&na Stopping Co. 



STEAMSHIP & FORWARDING AGENTS 

STEVEDORES 
MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



TWX: 919-255-2925 
Phone: 919-726-6173 
P. O. Box 650 



F.M.C. License ;rl079 
Cable Address 

"Dovles" 



17 



EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
Edward L. Mercaldo 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh. N. C. 



FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Fabricated Textile Products 

Germany — Draperies of cotton, linen, wool, staple 
and manmade fibers for interior decoration of living 
rooms. Requests price quotations with patterns c.i.f. 
Rotterdam. Requests replies in German. August Yan- 
kann, Raumausstattung, 62 Rheinstrasse, 415 Kre- 
feld. 
Sawmills, Planing Mills 

Germany — Lumber, pitch-pine, red-pine, red-wood, 
hemlock. North Carolina pine. Requests replies in 
German. Emil Schumacher, P. 0. Box 1307, 5238 
Hachenburg, Westerwald. 

Household Furniture 

Germany — Wood living room furniture, cabinets 
and sectional furniture, of mahogany, maple, etc. Re- 
quests price quotations, descriptive material c.i.f. 
Rotterdam. Requests replies in German. August Van- 
kann Raumaussatattung, 62 Rheinstrasse, 415 Kre- 
feld. 
Synthetic Materials 

Netherlands — All types of synthetic yarns for car- 
pet, upholstery, knitting industry. A. Hoogmolen 
X.V., 82a Goirkestraat, Tilburg. 
Soaps, Detergents, Cleaning Preparations, 

Perfumes, Cosmetics 

Netherlands — Cleaning preparations for household 
use, automobile maintenance, service stations house- 
hold pesticides, cosmetics. Kon. Leder en Drijfriemen- 
fabriek M.B. Regouin Cuyk a.d. Maas. 
Leather Gloves, Mittens 

Netherlands — Leather work gloves, specialized lea- 
ther working clothes. Kon. Leder en Drijfriemenfa- 
briek M.B. Regouin, Cuyk a.d. Maas. 

Glass, Glassware 

Panama — Glassware, enamelware, crystalware. La 
Victoria S.A., P. 0. Box 1280, Panama, R. P. 

Cutlery, Handtools, General Hardware 

France — Marine hardware, accessories, supplies; 
all categories of related marine articles for utilization 
on sailboats, motor-boats, pleasure crafts. Requests 
replies in French. Couach, S.A., 125 Boulevard de la 
Plage, 33-Arcachon, Gironde. 



18 



Farm Machinery 

England — Grain drying, storage, handling equip- 
ment. Henry Woods (Agricultural) Ltd., 45 Crouch 
Street, Colchester, Essex. 

Venezuela — Agricultural implements, machinery. 
Yela, S.A., Apartado 11367 de Chacao, Caracas. 

General Industrial Machinery 

Venezuela — Water pumps, hydraulic equipment, ac- 
cessories for water supply and sewage installations. 
Requests replies in Spanish. Lor Hidroequip, S.R.L., 
El Peaje No. 8, Caracas, or Apartado 10018, Caracas. 

Special Industry Machinery 

South Africa — Woodworking, box-making machin- 
ery. Boxes and Timber Products (Pty.) Ltd., P. O. 
Box 93, Parow, Cape Province. 

South Africa — Pre-boarding and post-boarding ma- 
chine for pressing, finishing of men's socks, especially 
nylon socks. Escombe Manufacturers Ltd., P. 0. Box 
50, Escombe, Natal. 
Service Industry Machines 

Qatar — Complete air conditioning units for do- 
mestic, commercial, industrial use. From ten-ton to 
100-ton units, air or water cooled. Gulf Electrical 
Materials Company, P. 0. Box 157, Doha, Qatar. 

Electronic Components, Accessories 

France — Radio, television receiving type parts, ac- 
cessories. Societe "Recta". 37, Avenue Ledru-Rollin, 
Paris, 12. 

Meat Products 

Netherlands — Canned meat specialties, such as 
corned beef hash, roastbeef hash, chili con carne, 
chicken cacciatori, meat balls, Beef Stroganoff, beef 
stew, spaghetti sauce, pizza sauce. N.V. Levensmid- 
delen Organisatie E.I., 45 Stadhouderslaan, Utrecht. 
Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

Austria — Denims for jeans. Buecking-Dreinaht 
Ges.m.b.H. & Co., KG, Waidhofnerstrasse 34, A-3300 
Amstetten/NOe. 

Textile Goods 

England — Towels, household, mainly jaquard and 
printed designs. L. Deyong & Co. Ltd., 40 42 Middle- 
sex Street, Longon, E.l. 
Men's, Youths', Boys' Suits, Coats, Overcoats 

France — Men's and boys' sport clothing. Requests 
replies in French. Interfactor, 132 Due du Faubourg 
St-Denis, Paris, 10. 
Women's, Misses', Juniors' Outerwear 

France — Women's and misses' dresses, ensemble 
dresses, skirts, beachwear, bathing suits. Requests 
replies in French. Interfactor, 132 Rue du Faubourg 
St-Denis, Paris, 10. 



2M 



North 
Carolina 

Our state's getting to be a big name in international trade, 
and it takes a big bank to keep up. A bank big enough and 
experienced enough to offer North Carolina business and 
industry direct banking and commercial connections 
throughout the world. Backed by total resources of more 
than $825 million and capital funds over $55 million, 
NCNB's International Department serves exporters and 
importers through letters of credit, acceptance financing, 
foreign collections, foreign exchange and remittance of 
funds. Whatever it takes, we're doing our best to meet the 
demands of this fast-moving state. And well we should. 
After all, it's part of our name. 

National 
Bank 

Offices in Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham. Greensboro. High Point. North Wilkesboro, Raleigh. Research Triangle, Statesville. Tarboro. Tryon, Wilmington and Winston Salem 







STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 

WAREHOUSES: Storage warehouses of 400,000 
square feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
Bonded warehouse space available. Additional 
100,000 square foot warehouse under construc- 
tion. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL: Customs Appraisal Ser- 
vice provided in modern appraiser warehouse 
at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tank- 
ers ; depth of 34 feet at mean low water (being 
deepened to 38 feet), and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Transit sheds with 506,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, 
open ends, 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, over- 
head bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE : Ten acres paved open storage, 
accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, hand- 
ling both truck and rail cars. Certified weight- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs, full length of wharf apron. Depressed 
tracks at rear of transit sheds and warehouses, 
entire length. Storage yard for 370 freight cars. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Booting Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 



FRIEDERICHS 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 3,695 feet long with a 50-foot apron. 
Capacity — seven 500-foot vessels simultane- 
ously. Channel and turning basin depth — 34 
feet at mean low water (being deepened to 38 
feet). 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry 
cranes used single or in tandem and equipped 
for 80-inch magnets and 2 and 6-yard bucket 
operation. One 35-ton locomotive crane. Four 
Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
of various sizes and accessories such as cotton 
clamps, etc. Light and heavy tractors and 
trailers and 5-ton mobile crane. Facilities for 
full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; ramps for easy access into 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumi- 
gation plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES : Served by Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road and Seaboard Air Line Railroad Com- 
panies and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 





A Facility of 

North Carolina State Ports Authority 

P. O. Box 578 

Southport, N. C. 28461 

Area<9 19-457-2621 



■^■p 




McNeill 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 2,550 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing four 500-foot cargo ships 
and one petroleum tanker, with a depth of 35 
feet at mean low water. Additional 2 ship 
berths totaling 1,075 feet under construction. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Two transit sheds of 100,000 
square feet. One constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry and one of metal. All with sprink- 
ler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Six storage warehouses, total- 
ing 456,000 square feet, with sprinkle and de- 
luge systems. — Total 25 fire segregation sec- 
tions. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available 
on terminal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
over, full length of wharf. Single depressed 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 

track full length of rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Southern Railway freight car 
storage yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
with detachable accessories such as barrel 
clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for 
full palletization cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; also easy access into transit 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest va- 
cuum Cyanide Fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 
cubic foot steel chambers, fully mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern- A&EC Rail- 
way System and the Beaufort-Morehead Rail- 
road and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Munatrer 



L. M. WALLACE 
Manager Export Dept. 



WADE H. PIERCE JESSE C. JACOBS 

Manager — Import Dept. Asst. Mgr. — Import Dept. 

Wilmington 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 

Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

Charlotte, N. C. Morehead City, N. C. 




BARBER 



LINE 

Specialists in Handling Tobacco 

• 

Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 



BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., P. O. Box No. 6334 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



SOUTHEASTERN NORTH CAROLINA 

INDUSTRIAL SITES 

AVAILABLE 



On Deep Water & Barge Channels 
Available Labor 

Good Transportation 
Year Round Climate 
Ideal Living Conditions 
Inquires Invited 



RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

FOR BRUNSWICK COUNTY 




POST OFFICE BOX 638 PHONE (919) 457-6356 

SOUTHPORT, NORTH CAROLINA 28461 




AT ITS BEST ! 



New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 



Ik 



For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 




MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 
JO? 

1865 -Years- 1966 
Now 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

Now Orleans 12, Lo. 

Corondolet Building 

JAckson 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SAratoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Street 
Phono: 625-4312 



Now York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 

WHItohall 4-9120 

F M.C. Lken.e No. 4S1 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agent, 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




^Mofe/isad Oty 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 
■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 



G. D. Zealand, 
Drawer B 
Beaufort, N. C. 



Executive Director 
919-728-31 15 
Courthouse Annex 



23 



CTP 




WITH 
ET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 
Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island -Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



24 



North Carolina state Library 

Raleigh 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO, 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington. Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color 



Block & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 91 9-762-6352 



F M.C No 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 



1211 McCall Street 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

P. Box 9J 

Ai.niiiu Station 

Charlotte, N. C. 28286 



Citizens Bank Bldg 
Norfolk 



Virginia 
Newport News 
at 125-B Twenty-Sixth Street 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldo. 



Alexandria, Va. 
P 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADOUAtTEBS. TRUCKING BUHDinG. «AIEICH 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



A. C. SMITH 

Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Mgr. -Export Oept. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 
Phone 726-6151 



Cable Address 
MORSHIPCO 



TWX NO. 919 255-2989 
Branch Office: Charlotte. \. C. 



North Carolina Stat* 
Raleigh 



Library 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 







BULK RATE 
U S Poilog* 

PAID 

RoUigh. N C 
Pcfmll No. 33 





14,141 SHIPS 





HEIDE COMPANY is still handling vessels with the emphasis 
on economy and efficiency. 

HEIDE COMPANY is still handling cargo with the emphasis 
on care and more care. 

HEIDE COMPANY is still handling principals with considera- 
tion and courtesy. 

HEIDE COMPANY plans to have the same things to say after 
we have worked 28,282 ships. 

Hopefully that will be someday soon. 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC 









FOUNDED 1869 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 
WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents ■ International Freight Forwarders • Stevedores 



'°9 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00748 3084